Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

PMI Lebanon Chapter Emotionally Intelligent Project Managers Ibrahim Dani, PMP 27 September 2012.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "PMI Lebanon Chapter Emotionally Intelligent Project Managers Ibrahim Dani, PMP 27 September 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 PMI Lebanon Chapter Emotionally Intelligent Project Managers Ibrahim Dani, PMP 27 September 2012

2 2 Session Outline What is Emotional Intelligence What are the Emotional Intelligence principles Why emotions matter How to develop Emotionally Intelligent attitudes Emotional Intelligence and Project Managers

3 3 Anyone can become angry, that is easy. But to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose, and in the right way, that is not easy. Aristotle

4 4 What is Emotional Intelligence 1.Being aware of, and in control of our own emotions while being empathetic enough to perceive and manage the emotions of others.

5 5 What is Emotional Intelligence 1. Being aware of, and in control of our own emotions while being empathetic enough to perceive and manage the emotions of others. 2.The ability to monitor one’s own and others’ feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them, and to use this information to guide one’s thinking and actions

6 6 What is Emotional Intelligence 1.Being aware of, and in control of our own emotions while being empathetic enough to perceive and manage the emotions of others. 2.The ability to monitor one’s own and others’ feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them, and to use this information to guide one’s thinking and actions. 3.The capacity to understand, value and wisely manage emotions in relationship to oneself and others

7 7 Emotional intelligence principles Emotional Intelligence is not one single thing, it is a mixture of attitudes, feelings and thoughts Emotional Intelligence predicts performance Emotional Intelligence can be measured Emotional Intelligence can be changed Developing your Emotional Intelligence will impact on all areas of your life

8 8 Emotional intelligence approaches Emotional intelligence and personality Emotional intelligence and motivation Emotional intelligence and competencies

9 9 Character traits of emotionally intelligent people Continuous striving for personal development Unrelenting commitment to support others’ interests Clarity of intentions Sustaining positive values listening and observation Objectivity Challenging the status quo Taking the longer view Converting negative inclinations into positive thoughts Nurturing the team

10 10 Character traits of those who are not emotionally intelligent Assume that something good will turn up See things only through their own eyes Are imprecise about their goals Follow the crowd before they follow their conscience Reject the opinions of those they perceive to lack authority Don’t want to believe they can change themselves or others Put status before authority React on impulse not thought Are pessimistic in the face of change Communicate what they think people want to hear

11 11 Why emotions matter? Emotions are contagious A group of volunteers played the role of managers allocating bonuses to their subordinates A trained actor was planted to talk first and project among different groups: cheerful enthusiasm relaxed warmth depressed sluggishness hostile irritability Result: the actor ‘infected’ the groups with his emotions ‘happy’ groups distributed the money fairly

12 12 Why emotions matter? Emotions are manageable Roadway Express Inc. launched a “Breakthrough Leadership Program” based on emotional intelligence, focusing on: helping managers identify areas for behaviour changes, then giving them opportunities to practice new habits real-time. The program helped everyone understand and manage emotions: cope with stress make better decisions Results within 3 years: injuries decreased by 43% annually accidents decreased by 41% annually saved $6 million

13 13 Why emotions matter? Emotions compared to IQ A study for 40 years of 450 boys suggested that IQ had little relation to how well they did at work The main triggers for success were childhood abilities such as: handling frustration controlling emotions getting along with other people

14 14 Why emotions matter? Emotions compared to IQ 80 PhD graduates at Berkeley underwent a battery of personality and IQ tests in the 1950s 40 years later, estimates were made of their success social and emotional abilities were 4 times more important than IQ in determining professional success and prestige

15 15 Why emotions matter? Emotions compared to IQ

16 16 Why emotions matter? Emotions help IQ Emotional skills help improve cognitive skills “Marshmallow studies” at Stanford University 4-years kids left alone in a room with a marshmallow if they don’t eat the marshmallow, they will have two later, those who waited had higher scores in SAT

17 17 Why emotions matter? Optimists are better learners 500 members of the freshman class at the University of Pennsylvania were tested their scores on a test of optimism were a better predictor of actual grades than SAT scores or high school grades

18 18 Why emotions matter? Optimists are better sales reps In a research at Met Life about new sales reps optimists sold 37% more insurance in 2 years To verify research, Met Life hired a special group who scored high on optimism but failed normal screening outsold pessimists by 21% in their first year, and outsold pessimists by 57% in the second year

19 19 Why emotions matter? Empathy contributes to success A Harvard study discovered that people who were best at identifying others’ emotions, were more successful in their work, as well as more successful in their social lives A survey of retail sales buyers found that apparel sales reps were valued primarily for their empathy: buyers wanted reps who could listen well, and really understand what they wanted

20 20 Why emotions matter? EI creates better leaders According to hundreds of studies: effective leaders use more emotional intelligence competencies every day than mediocre leaders leaders who are able to establish “mutual trust, respect, and a certain warmth and rapport” with members of their group will be more effective Project managers are no exception

21 21 Emotional Intelligence: two aspects of intelligence Intrapersonal intelligence picking up what’s going on inside us and doing what needs to be done about it Interpersonal intelligence picking up what’s going on in -and between- other people and doing what needs to be done about it

22 22 Self-regard Intrapersonal intelligenceInterpersonal intelligence Regard for others Self-awarenessAwareness of others Self-management Emotional resilience Personal power Goal directedness Flexibility Personal connectedness Invitation to trust Relationship management Trust Balanced outlook – realism Conflict handling Interdependence

23 23 Self-management: Emotional resilience How well do you bounce back when things go wrong? Emotional resilience: effectively recover from negative situations turn negative thoughts and emotions into positive ones

24 24 Self-management: Personal power Do you see yourself as a victim? always looking to blame other people or things for your failure to succeed? Personal power: take control of your life be responsible for your own actions

25 25 Self-management: Goal directedness Do you regularly find your self procrastinating? looking for excuses? spending time on things that will not help you achieve your goals? Goal directedness: be clear on your goals ensure that your attitudes, beliefs, and actions do support your movement towards your goals

26 26 Self-management: Flexibility Do you resist change? Always trying to hold on the way things used to be? Flexibility adapt your thoughts, attitudes and behaviour in time of change see change as an opportunity to create something new and better

27 27 Self-management: Personal connectedness Are you honest with yourself about how you feel? Are you open to others about your true feelings? Personal connectedness: make significant connections with others be prepared to communicate your true feelings to others

28 28 Self-management: Invitation to trust Do you change your opinion just to be liked by others? Do you regularly fail to keep promises? Do you say things you don’t really mean? Invitation to trust: be consistent, true to your word and reliable

29 29 Relationship management: Trust Do you trust all people all the time? do you get disappointed? does this allow others to take advantage of you? Do you not trust anyone? are you suspicious of everyone? does this make you feel lonely? Trust: be careful when you trust people be vigilant

30 30 Relationship management: Balanced outlook – Realism Do you focus on what’s wrong with things? do you always highlight problems? Do you assume everything will be OK? do you set unrealistic goals? Balanced outlook: keep a positive attitude, but realistic one focus on solutions rather than problems

31 31 Relationship management: Emotional expression and control Do your emotions change quickly? one moment feeling relaxed and happy, the next you are angry Do you hide your emotions? believe it is not appropriate to show how you feel? Emotional expression and control: don‘t allow your emotions to burst into your behaviour choose when to allow your emotions to show

32 32 Relationship management: Conflict handling Do you regularly shy away from conflict? do you use humour to avoid discussions Do you view conflict as a battle ending in a winner and a loser do you always want to be the winner? do you find yourself shouting, interrupting and not listening? Conflict handling: be assertive, standing up for your own wants and needs be prepared to listen, understand and compromise

33 33 Relationship management: Interdependence Do you depend too much on others? do you find false security with the people around you? Do you believe in “if you want something to be perfectly done, do it your self” do you think working with others holds you back? Interdependence: recognise that you can be successful on your own, but also believe that cooperating with others is usually productive: = 4

34 34 Self-management vs Relationship management Self-management scales are linear: more is better Emotional resilience, personal power, goal directedness, flexibility, personal connectedness, invitation to trust Relationship management scales are bipolar: seek a balance Trust, balanced outlook, emotional expression and control, conflict handling, interdependence

35 35 Can emotional intelligence be improved? YES. HOW? Reflective learning look back at your experiences reflect on how you and others: thought, felt, behaved and do something about it...

36 36 Improve your emotional intelligence what to improve? Improve the emotional intelligence foundations: Self-regard  high self-regard Regard for others  high regard to others Self-awareness  high self-awareness Awareness of others  high awareness of others

37 37 Improve your self-regard Regularly think positive thoughts about your self Always be optimistic Be comfortable saying ‘no’ and giving honest explanation Don’t look to blame others Don’t avoid conflict, embrace it with assertiveness Don’t criticise your physical appearance Don’t ever wish you are someone else

38 38 Improve your regard for others Regularly think positive thoughts about others Don’t criticise people, criticise their behaviour Regularly praise people, and their behaviour Focus on the strengths of people, not their weaknesses In conflict, focus on criticising actions and opinions, not people Don’t criticise the physical appearance of other people

39 39 Improve your self-awareness Regularly pay attention to how you are feeling Be a good listener to your body Believe that emotions are at least as important as rational thoughts Be aware of how your body communicates good/bad emotions Regularly use your intuition when making decisions Regularly reflect on your actions

40 40 Improve your awareness of others Regularly pay attention to how other people are feeling Be a good listener to others, and rarely interrupt them Be aware of other people body language Regularly ask people how they are feeling Ask a lot of open questions to help you understand others Listen carefully to the words other people choose to use

41 41 How to improve your emotional intelligence Change your habits: train your self to respond rather than react when facing certain situations or feeling particular emotions Respond: consciously, intentionally, knowingly, wilfully, deliberately, on purpose React: unconsciously, mechanically, instinctively, reflexively, involuntarily, without thinking Controlled Responsiveness Uncontrolled Reaction

42 42 How to change your habits Changing your habits take time, but it is doable Unconsciously incompetent Consciously incompetent Consciously Competent Unconsciously Competent Uncontrolled reaction Controlled responsiveness

43 43 EI and Project Managers Self awareness and control Stay in touch with your own feelings Be honest with yourself Practice keeping your feelings under control Practice distinguishing between what you feel and what you think Build self-confidence and self-esteem Learn to communicate effectively Reflect on your own vision Demonstrate “passion” for the task at hand complain about your project’s complexity and the excitement is destroyed immediately

44 44 EI and Project Managers Social awareness and recognition Put in extra effort to listen and observe Put empathy in action Understand the emotional needs of the team Mould and inspire the team Manage emotions

45 45 And to wrap up... Emotional intelligence is not new abilities associated with it have been studied for years A growing body of research suggests that these abilities are important for success in many areas a person’s ability to perceive, identify and manage emotions provides the basis for success in any job Use the power of emotional intelligence to ignite excitement in your organisation you’ll be amazed at the results !

46 46 Anyone can become angry, that is easy. But to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose, and in the right way, that is not easy. Aristotle

47 47 Thank You!

48 48 References Selected articles and book reviews from the “Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence in Organizations” Goleman, Daniel (1995); “Emotional Intelligence”, Bantam Books, New York Goleman, Daniel (1998); “Working with Emotional Intelligence”, Bantam Books, New York Kite, Neilson and Kay, Frances (2012); “Understanding Emotional Intelligence”, Kogan Page Limited, London Mersino, Anthony (2007); “Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers”, AMACOM, New York Neale, Stephen et al (2009); “Emotional Intelligence Coaching”, Kogan Page Limited, London


Download ppt "PMI Lebanon Chapter Emotionally Intelligent Project Managers Ibrahim Dani, PMP 27 September 2012."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google