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Bridging Research, Information and Culture An Initiative of the Research and Planning Group for California Community Colleges Your Name Your Institution.

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Presentation on theme: "Bridging Research, Information and Culture An Initiative of the Research and Planning Group for California Community Colleges Your Name Your Institution."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bridging Research, Information and Culture An Initiative of the Research and Planning Group for California Community Colleges Your Name Your Institution Date Research is a Partnership

2 Footer Subtitle Line: Usually Name of Author, Use Regular Not Boldface Overview Research vs. Reporting Research Process Collaboration Cycle Relationship between Practitioners and Researchers How Researchers Can Help Practitioners How Practitioners Can Help Researchers Reality Check Balance between Reality and Rigor Advice from Successful Collaborators

3 Footer Subtitle Line: Usually Name of Author, Use Regular Not Boldface Outcomes Differentiate between reporting and research Illustrate the roles of practitioners and researchers in the research process Recognize how research works better as a partnership between practitioners and researchers Appreciate the realities of the research process

4 Footer Subtitle Line: Usually Name of Author, Use Regular Not Boldface Research v. Reporting Research Dynamic Answers the questions of how and why Quantitative and/or qualitative Helps determine impact/effect and problems Reporting Static Answers what, how many, and who Quantitative only Helps identify whether a problem may exist, but not what the problem may be

5 Footer Subtitle Line: Usually Name of Author, Use Regular Not Boldface Research Process: Collaboration Cycle

6 Footer Subtitle Line: Usually Name of Author, Use Regular Not Boldface Relationship between Researchers and Practitioners Researchers need to understand the program/project Program/project leaders need to understand the demands on the researcher Develop the research question and methodology together Researcher is seen as a member of the team Ongoing relationship is key to ongoing success of the evaluation

7 Footer Subtitle Line: Usually Name of Author, Use Regular Not Boldface How Researchers Can Help Practitioners Provide options for assessment methods Share knowledge of data already available Facilitate accurate data interpretation Listen Do NOT dictate data to be used Do NOT advocate changing program/project to fit data

8 Footer Subtitle Line: Usually Name of Author, Use Regular Not Boldface How Practitioners Can Help Researchers Invite and include the researcher in the conversation early Share details of the project/program with the researcher (e.g., goals, data, interventions, intended outcomes) Consider the options provided by the researcher and provide constructive feedback Keep the researcher involved and informed about ongoing progress and changes Work with the researcher to make the data meaningful and useful Be patient and understanding

9 Footer Subtitle Line: Usually Name of Author, Use Regular Not Boldface Reality Check Balance between Reality and Rigor First identify data already being collected Data collection should not place an undue burden on the program/project Use direct measures whenever possible and reasonable Need to ensure that data being collected are actually measuring what you intended to assess Requires conversation between practitioners and researcher to achieve a suitable balance

10 Footer Subtitle Line: Usually Name of Author, Use Regular Not Boldface Reality Check Advice from the Collaborators Start discussion with what you want to know about program/project Decide on data collection BEFORE implementation, if possible Be flexible, open and available Be involved, invested and stay informed Work together as partners Data and research are your friends!!!

11 Footer Subtitle Line: Usually Name of Author, Use Regular Not Boldface Interactive Activity Preparing to Meet with the Researcher Identify an intervention about which you have a question that could be answered through research. You have contacted your Research office and have a meeting scheduled. How do you prepare for this meeting? What kind of information do you gather and/or review? What kind of questions would you ask the researcher?

12 Footer Subtitle Line: Usually Name of Author, Use Regular Not Boldface Interactive Activity Have answers to the following questions: 1. Goal(s) – What effect do you intend the intervention to have? 2. Outcomes – What tangible results do you expect to see from students? 3. Intervention – What are the specific actions that involve or engage students? Where and when are the points of contact with students? 4. Data – What data will demonstrate intended outcomes? What data are the program/project already collecting or planning to collect?

13 Footer Subtitle Line: Usually Name of Author, Use Regular Not Boldface Interactive Activity Example: 1. Goal(s) – Improve students’ success in basic skills courses through …? 2. Outcomes –Users have higher success rates than non-users; Increased rate of success to transfer over time 3. Intervention – one-on-one tutoring, phone calls during 1st three weeks of term 4. Data – Course grades, test results, portfolio assessments, surveys

14 Footer Subtitle Line: Usually Name of Author, Use Regular Not Boldface The BRIC Initiative BRIC: The RP Group: Contact: Rob Johnstone Project Director, Priyadarshini Chaplot Project Coordinator,


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