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This cartoon by the British cartoonist Illingworth appeared in the Daily Mail on 9 September 1948. The words on the mice read: ‘Berliners' and ‘Western.

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Presentation on theme: "This cartoon by the British cartoonist Illingworth appeared in the Daily Mail on 9 September 1948. The words on the mice read: ‘Berliners' and ‘Western."— Presentation transcript:

1 This cartoon by the British cartoonist Illingworth appeared in the Daily Mail on 9 September The words on the mice read: ‘Berliners' and ‘Western Powers’.

2 What is the message of this cartoon?

3 To do this question, you need first to borrow two concepts from English: Denotation (what you see) Connotation (how it affects its audience) This cartoon by the British cartoonist Illingworth appeared in the Daily Mail on 9 September The words on the mice read: ‘Berliners' and ‘Western Powers’.

4 Stalin has blocked up the mouse-hole. A simple parallel with the Berlin Blockade. Denotation Connotation Meaning On 24 June 1948 the Russians had stopped all road and rail traffic into West Berlin. This cartoon by the British cartoonist Illingworth appeared in the Daily Mail on 9 September The words on the mice read: ‘Berliners' and ‘Western Powers’.

5 Stalin is represented as a cat, ‘playing’ with the mouse labelled: ‘Berliners’. A cat will often ‘play’ with a captured mouse … before killing it. Denotation Connotation Meaning Stalin has not invaded West Berlin, but is just ‘toying’ with them by mounting the Blockade, before he moves in and ‘devours them’ (i.e. takes over). This cartoon by the British cartoonist Illingworth appeared in the Daily Mail on 9 September The words on the mice read: ‘Berliners' and ‘Western Powers’.

6 The mice labelled ‘Western powers’ scurry around in alarm. They fear they will be the next to be cornered and devoured. Denotation Connotation Meaning When he has acquired Berlin, Stalin will move on to devour other western powers (i.e. this is an early version of the Domino Theory). This cartoon by the British cartoonist Illingworth appeared in the Daily Mail on 9 September The words on the mice read: ‘Berliners' and ‘Western Powers’.

7 Finally, always remember to look at: Origin (who drew it) Date (when it was published) This cartoon by the British cartoonist Illingworth appeared in the Daily Mail on 9 September The words on the mice read: ‘Berliners' and ‘Western Powers’.

8 This cartoon by the British cartoonist Illingworth appeared in the Daily Mail on 9 September Illingworth. Illingworth worked for the right- wing, anti-Soviet Daily Mail. Origin Details Significance This represents a ‘straight-down- the-line’ western propaganda view – that Stalin is blockading Berlin as an attempt to conquer it, and will move on to other countries after that. The words on the mice read: ‘Berliners' and ‘Western Powers’.

9 This cartoon by the British cartoonist Illingworth appeared in the Daily Mail on 9 September September Three months into the Blockade, when it was still doubtful whether the airlift would succeed. Date Details Significance This is designed to emphasise how evil Stalin is, and the danger he represents – in order to motivate the British public to support the airlift and thwart the Blockade. The words on the mice read: ‘Berliners' and ‘Western Powers’.


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