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MAKING THINKING VISIBLE FOR SECONDARY MATHEMATICS LESSONS USING THINKING ROUTINES Service With Honour.

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Presentation on theme: "MAKING THINKING VISIBLE FOR SECONDARY MATHEMATICS LESSONS USING THINKING ROUTINES Service With Honour."— Presentation transcript:

1 MAKING THINKING VISIBLE FOR SECONDARY MATHEMATICS LESSONS USING THINKING ROUTINES Service With Honour

2 FLOW OF PRESENTATION At the end of the sharing, participants will be able to see how thinking routines are incorporated into lessons. (1)Introduction of Thinking Routines (2)See, Think, Wonder - Written Assignment: Types on Numbers - E-Learning: Probability - Hands-on Activity for You! (3) Claim, Support, Question - Activity: Sieve of Eratosthenes - Activity: Types of Numbers - Activity: Geometric Properties of Circles

3 WHAT ARE THINKING ROUTINES?

4 Examine the development of learning processes in children, adults, and organisations. Today, Project Zero’s work includes investigations into the nature of intelligence, understanding, thinking, creativity, ethics, and other essential aspects of human learning. Learning from the experts.. HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

5 TOOLS FOR FOR THE TEACHERS, HABITS FOR THE STUDENTS Thinking routines are simple structures that students can settle down to during lessons. Thinking routines can be applied across disciplines and grade levels. Tools for the teachers, habits for the students

6 Visible Thinking emphasies several ways of making students' thinking visible to themselves and one another, so that they can improve it. Visible Thinking emphasises several ways of making students' thinking visible to themselves and one another, so that they can improve it. Learning from the experts.. EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

7 Tools for the teachers, habits for the students SEE, THINK, WONDER

8 SEE, THINK, WONDER Purpose Encourages students to make careful observations and thoughtful interpretations. Stimulates curiosity and sets the stage for inquiry. Application: When and Where Can It Be Used? Use the routine at the beginning of a new unit to motivate student interest with an object that connects to a topic during the unit of study near the end of a unit to encourage students to further apply their new knowledge and ideas. SEE, THINK, WONDER

9 ASSESSMENT “See”: the ability to notice details “Think”: how students support their interpretation and assertions “Wonder”: questions that are broad and adventurous rather than those that require specific factual responses from Making Thinking Visible SEE, THINK, WONDER

10 WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT: TYPES OF NUMBERS JH1 MA100 Written Assignment 1: QuestionsQuestions SEE, THINK, WONDER

11 E-LEARNING: PROBABILITY JH2 MA203 E-learning (June Holiday) SEE, THINK, WONDER

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14 THE DESIGN: FACTORS TO CONSIDER The video or object must offer a rich context or content such that details or interpretations can emerge after examination or thinking. While addressing a particular topic, there should be a scope for linking up different areas or fields. A platform must be provided for students to engage in group activity where participants build on the responses offered by others. SEE, THINK, WONDER

15 SAMPLE RESPONSES FROM STUDENTS SEE, THINK, WONDER

16 SEE: NOTICING DETAILS Student C.C.Y. The dots on a die are created by removing the material used to make the die. Between the sides with numbers '1' and '2', the side with number '2' will have more material removed, thus the die will be biased to one of the sides. Therefore, the outcomes will not be equally likely. SEE, THINK, WONDER

17 WONDER: DRAWING BROAD IDEAS Student L.K.Y. Something else that I like to say about the video is that the terms brought out are very insightful. One thing that I have learnt is that in math or in anything actually, we should always look at the big picture rather than the individual jigsaw puzzle pieces. SEE, THINK, WONDER

18 WONDER: DRAWING BROAD IDEAS Student M.E.Q. The fact that the human brain favours specific numbers and patterns also fascinates me. What causes the human brain to think that certain numbers and patterns are more random than others? Is it an unconscious action ingrained into our brains or is it caused by something else...(Any answers?) SEE, THINK, WONDER

19 IN RESPONSE... Student T.Y.F. I'm not exactly sure about a good answer, but humans have a cognitive bias towards certain patterns, which is "a pattern of deviation in judgment, whereby inferences of other people and situations may be drawn in an illogical fashion." (quote Wikipedia) If you wish to inquire further, a good place to start would be about pseudo-randomness, though I'm not too sure if it is related. SEE, THINK, WONDER

20 THINK: UNSUPPORTED ASSERTIONS Student H.W.G. Probability is basically based on a fair situation under fair conditions. SEE, THINK, WONDER

21 IN RESPONSE... Teacher When you read the papers and people talk about odds and probability, are the events/outcomes all fair? SEE, THINK, WONDER

22 SEE, THINK, WONDER: HANDS-ON ACTIVITY Materials: Scissors Paper Wondering mind SEE, THINK, WONDER

23 CLAIM, SUPPORT, QUESTION

24 Purpose Helps students develop thoughtful interpretations by encouraging them to reason with evidence. Learn to identify truth claims and explore strategies for uncovering truth. Application: When and Where Can It Be Used? Use the routine with topics in the curriculum that invite explanation or are open to interpretation. The questions can challenge the plausibility of the claim, and often lead to a deeper understanding of the reasoning process. CLAIM, SUPPORT, QUESTION

25 OBJECTIVES (1) Engage students to explore strategies for uncovering mathematical relationships. (2) Help students support their claims through logical reasoning. (3) Develop students’ self-directed learning capability through the raising of questions by students. CLAIM, SUPPORT, QUESTION

26 ASSESSMENT When making a claim, are students: looking for generalisations that get to the truth? When supporting a claim, are students anchoring the claim with solid evidence? recognising special cases? from Making Thinking Visible CLAIM, SUPPORT, QUESTION

27 GEOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF CIRCLES Students are given a pseudo-real life scenario. They need to use their knowledge of geometrical properties of circles to solve the problem of dividing food equitably during a shipwreck. The Claim-Support-Question Strategy is used to engage students in making their thinking visible. CLAIM, SUPPORT, QUESTION

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29 TYPES OF NUMBERS CLAIM, SUPPORT, QUESTION

30 SAMPLE OF STUDENT’S WORK CLAIM, SUPPORT, QUESTION

31 SIEVE OF ERATOSTHENES Claim Your friend claims that the above steps just needs to be repeated as far as the number 7 for all primes smaller than 100 to be identified. Support Can you support your friend’s claim? Question How do we determine if a number is prime? CLAIM, SUPPORT, QUESTION

32 Thank You QUESTION AND ANSWER


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