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B ASIC & G IRLS ’ E DUCATION S ECTOR An Overview November 5, 2008 Global Educational Regional Advisory Committee Meeting Johannesburg, South Africa.

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Presentation on theme: "B ASIC & G IRLS ’ E DUCATION S ECTOR An Overview November 5, 2008 Global Educational Regional Advisory Committee Meeting Johannesburg, South Africa."— Presentation transcript:

1 B ASIC & G IRLS ’ E DUCATION S ECTOR An Overview November 5, 2008 Global Educational Regional Advisory Committee Meeting Johannesburg, South Africa

2 G OALS OF THE 2008 G LOBAL ERAC M EETING Discuss how ERAC can support organizational objectives around program quality. Review existing plan of action and revise ERACs Plan of Action Gather input for new BGE sector Strategy Build capacity of CARE to improve educational quality through its programs

3 T HE A GENDA Day One: Taking stock – BGE, Country Office and External Perspectives Day Two: Planning our Future – BGE sector strategy and country office tools Day Three: Time for Reflection – Regional Discussions Day Four: Bringing it all Together: Wrap up and Learning Exchange

4 A N O VERVIEW Education and CAREBasic & Girls’ Education UnitEducational Regional Advisory Committees Special Initiatives (Patsy Collins Trust Fund Initiative and Power Within Signature Program) Education Sector Strategy

5 T RENDS IN E DUCATION AT CARE Sector Spending: 23 million (FY07) $28 million (FY06) In FY07, 314 projects reported education work. 121 were reported as exclusive education projects. The majority of CARE’s education work is in Africa (60 of 121 projects) Formal primary education is our most common project focus, followed by community management of schools & literacy for out- of-school children. Education is being added to integrated programs. CARE’s adult literacy work has doubled in Africa & Asia & vocational work has shown a 140% increase in Africa.

6 T RENDS E DUCATION AT CARE CARE is increasing projects with very vulnerable groups. Work with out-of-school children increased in the past year by more than forty percent in all four regions. CARE’s work in advocacy has shown a steady rise (more than doubling in Africa, and rising by 27% and 15% in Asia and Latin America, respectively). Universal to almost all of CARE’s programming in education is improving teaching and learning environments. Early childhood development work is increasing in Africa (decreasing everywhere else). Orphans and vulnerable children work also increased in Africa. Middle East and Eastern Europe continues to have a relatively high number of girls’ education programs (girls’ education work is decreasing in Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean). Child Labor ranks high in Latin America and the Caribbean, as does focus on capacity building of PTAs, NGOs, and government. Learning environments stand out in Asia ; activities like school building, sanitation, water and material provisions have increased.

7 W HAT IS THE MANDATE OF THE BGE U NIT ? Technical leadership Allocation and stewardship of global resources Knowledge sharing and organizational learning Advocacy and representation We are a part of the Program Quality and Impact Division

8 W HO IS THE BGE U NIT ? Sarah Bouchie, BGE Unit Unit Director Stephanie Baric Education Advisor Vacant Power Within Manager Geeta Menon, Senior Technical Advisor Camber Brand, Program Officer Vacant, Senior Education Advisor Pamela Young, Senior Technical Advisor, OVC Ted Neil, ECD Fellow Kumkum Kashiparekh, Organizational Learning Advisor Margaret Meagher, Senior Advisor, Girls’ Education John Trew, Senior Technical Advisor Joyce Adolwa, Technical Advisor Amanda Moll, Program Associate L’Erin Asantewaa Program Associate BGE and EDU Ramon Pino, Account Analyst

9 W HAT IS THE BGE U NIT WORKING ON NOW ? Sector standards Management of central grants Supporting donor stewardship Education field guide Communication, knowledge strategy Representation and Advocacy Basic & girls’ education sector strategy

10 E DUCATIONAL R EGIONAL A DVISORY C OMMITTEES There are three committees (Africa; Asia, Middle East and Eastern Europe; and Latin America and the Caribbean) Link professionals in the sector Voluntary participation Face-to-face meetings have been approximately every 18 months. Purpose to promote learning and sharing Also serve a critical role in advising the Basic & Girls’ Education Unit

11 Education Regional Advisory Committee –Time line ERAC an organizational innovation for the Unit:  Establishing program standards and best practices  Provide guidance and support in identifying and carrying out staff development activities.  M&E framework is integrated into CARE practices.  Identify and share lessons learned.  Assist in the process of documenting CARE's work in Education. LAC Region AFRICA Region AMEE Region OLAT PCA Tool Documents: Improving Quality of Education Through Communities and Teachers Cross Visit :Community Schools LAC Regional Initiatives PCTFI Scholarship Funds Learning Opportunities Learning Journey Series: AMEE & LAC SII INEE; UNGEI; Cross Visit between Cambodia & Timor Leste Best practices shared Advocacy on Child Labor and Bilingual and Intercultural Education 01-04: Miami Guatemala Peru Atlanta and Honduras Programmatic Priorities Child Labor; IBE (A strategy for advocating for greater IBE opportunities) Literacy; M&E; RBA; Scaling up; Partnership OLAT Position CARE as an education leader in the Region 01-03: Cairo; Addis Ababa and Bamako Learning Agendas : Staff skills development; Project design; M&E; Advocacy; Partnership; Education in crisis and emergency Scaling up Organizational: RBA; Capacity (CSO); Regional Initiatives : HIV/AIDs; OSY Draft Tool : RBA; Tool: PCA; OLAT 01-03: Bangkok Philippines Cambodia and Atlanta M&E; RBA; Information Technology Staff skills development; Project design; Working with Government, Donors, and Community Regional Overview OLAT Cairo IBE; Child Labor; Community education Cairo Learning Agenda Staff skills development; Project design; M&E; Documentation; Advocacy Organizational: learn & reflect on own experiences & approaches Regional: HIV/Aids; OSY Cairo Quality : Discussion paper and contribution to GED; Cross Sectoral Approaches Contribute to Organizational learning; Sharing Experiences; Representation of education sector 06-07: Bolivia and Atlanta Quality of education focused on marginalized girls; Best practices shared Advocacy on Child Labor and Bilingual and Intercultural Education; Social and Community participation to improve relevance of education. LAC coordinator 2 year work plan Atlanta and Ghana Steering Group Formed Work Plan Atlanta and New Delhi Quality : Discussion paper and contribution to GED; Cross Sectoral Approaches Contribute to Organizational learning; Sharing Experiences; Representation of education sector

12 6 Essentials There is a Community Being a member of the ERAC means something special to the members, & the community has a certain priority and or work plan. Members are keen to meet each other because they benefit from the network- A community which has active members with an interest in sharing their learning’s and building knowledge. There is a Domain There is a Practice There is a Mandate Each of the regional ERACS has a clear domain, a thematic orientation that is neither too narrow nor too large. This domain is relevant and meaningful to the members; they are interested in specific topics and expect to improve their own practice by sharing experience related to what they do. There is a Motivation There is formal & informal structure Each and every member has his/her own practice within the domain of the ERAC, and that we know of and about each others work. And hopefully our own work/practice serves as a kind of reality check when sharing experience, concepts and strategies. Reflecting on one’s own practice against the background of other practices is one of the essentials being a member of the ERAC group This ERAC, as we have seen, exists only through the motivation of its members. This motivation is recognizable by their personal interest and the priority they assign in their daily work. We also adhere to this means by developing a passion for it. By means of a mandate, the management of the organization shows its interest in and commitment. It defines, on one hand, the thematic focus and the expected concrete results. On the other hand, the mandate provides an open space for self-commitment to its members, in terms of time and financial resources. Our ERAC structure is beyond organizational boxes and lines as there is no hierarchy –this is not an important element. There is a crosslink. SDC - Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation

13 Information TO Knowledge Networks Connecting Members & Reference Group that periodically advises BGE unit Reference Group + Sharing Project Information to validate good practices Collaborate with each other and BGE to organize collective knowledge Develop innovative ideas; A collaborative Group with an agenda driven by ERAC Our Path

14 P ATSY C OLLINS T RUST F UND I NITIATIVE Innovation Knowledge Generation Cross-sectoral Programming Organizational Learning Advocacy and Coalition Building

15 P ATSY C OLLINS T RUST F UND I NITIATIVE Innovation Innovation Cohorts Advocacy Grants Program Knowledge Generation Indicator Framework and Cross- Site Analysis Strategic Impact Inquiry Cross-Sectoral Programming HIV/AIDS and Education Pilot Collaboration with Other Sectors Organizational Learning Knowledge Products Training Modules Scholarship Fund Advocacy and Coalition Building Participation in Global Forums and Meetings Scholarship Fund

16 P OWER W ITHIN : S IGNATURE P ROGRAM FOR G IRLS ’ E DUCATION AND L EADERSHIP 10 million girls complete primary school with the skills to be leaders in their world. Support for Girl’s Rights Quality Education Leadership Opportunities

17 O BJECTIVES AND C OMPONENTS OF THE P OWER W ITHIN Objective 1: Increase the number of girls completing primary school. Equitable, quality education School transitions Learning opportunities for older girls Gender sensitive policies and programs Objective 2: Build girls’ leadership skills. Diverse extracurricular activities for girls Social networks of girls Girls’ participation in civic action Objective 3: Advocate for the rights of girls. Attention to harmful traditional practices Reduction of risk and vulnerability Role models, mentors and champions for girls

18 P URPOSE OF THE BGE S ECTOR S TRATEGY Define CARE’s Global Direction Enhance Shared Learning Common Purpose

19 E DUCATION S ECTOR S TRATEGY Information Gathering Background Papers on external, internal and organizational trends Analysis Reference Group Discussion BGE Unit Retreat Draft Strategy External Consult- ation Sector Meeting Final Strategy Internal Approvals

20 T HANK Y OU ! Any questions for us?

21 Group work Outline for each of the Regions Take stock of progress and limitation How far have we come in the past last year?  Compared to the Assessment sheet  Compared to the Work plan Address the administration and sustainability of the ERAC  Is it feasible to have participation in the ERAC?  If so WHY and HOW How can we work together? Discuss the modes of communication that have been most effective (or can be most effective) for your ERAC:  Brainstorm uses of technology, regular meetings, joint projects, or other ways to keep in touch Define ERAC structure for the future Identify goals of each ERAC What can BGE expect from the ERAC GROUPS?  Connecting members  Validate good practice  Organize collective knowledge  Develop innovative ideas Reference Group + Sharing Project Information to validate good practices Collaborate with each other and BGE to organize collective knowledge Develop innovative ideas; A collaborative Group with an agenda driven by ERAC Information TO Knowledge Networks Connecting Members and a Reference Group that periodically advises BGE unit


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