Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Taís Colavolpe Little Red Cap. At childhood’s end, the houses petered out into playing fields, the factory, allotments kept, like mistresses, by kneeling.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Taís Colavolpe Little Red Cap. At childhood’s end, the houses petered out into playing fields, the factory, allotments kept, like mistresses, by kneeling."— Presentation transcript:

1 Taís Colavolpe Little Red Cap

2 At childhood’s end, the houses petered out into playing fields, the factory, allotments kept, like mistresses, by kneeling married men, the silent railway line, the hermit’s caravan, till you came at last to the edge of the woods. It was there that I first clapped eyes on the wolf. He stood in a clearing, reading his verse out loud in his wolfy drawl, a paperback in his hairy paw, red wine staining his bearded jaw. What big ears he had! What big eyes he had! What teeth! In the interval, I made quite sure he spotted me, sweet sixteen, never been, babe, waif, and bought me a drink, my first. You might ask why. Here’s why. Poetry. The wolf, I knew, would lead me deep into the woods, away from home, to a dark tangled thorny place lit by the eyes of owls. I crawled in his wake, my stockings ripped to shreds, scraps of red from my blazer snagged on twig and branch, murder clues. I lost both shoes.

3 but got there, wolf’s lair, better beware. Lesson one that night, breath of the wolf in my ear, was the love poem. I clung till dawn to his thrashing fur, for what little girl doesn’t dearly love a wolf? Then I slid from between his heavy matted paws and went in search of a living bird - white dove - which flew, straight, from my hands to his open mouth. One bite, dead. How nice, breakfast in bed, he said, licking his chops. As soon as he slept, I crept to the back of the lair, where a whole wall was crimson, gold, aglow with books. Words, words were truly alive on the tongue, in the head, warm, beating, frantic, winged; music and blood. But then I was young - and it took ten years in the woods to tell that a mushroom stoppers the mouth of a buried corpse, that birds are the uttered thoughts of trees, that a greying wolf howls the same old song at the moon, year in, year out, season after season, same rhyme, same reason. I took an axe to a willow to see how it wept. I took an axe to a salmon to see how it leapt. I took an axe to the wolf as he slept, one chop, scrotum to throat, and saw the glistening, virgin white of my grandmother’s bones. I filled his old belly with stones. I stitched him up. Out of the forest I come with my flowers, singing, all alone.

4 Form 7 stanzas 6 lines each Lines vary from 9 to 16 syllables No discernible meter; free verse Internal rhyme: “drawl/paw/jaw”, “shreds/red”, “clues/shoes”, “stones/ bones”

5 Literal Meaning Girl (Little Red Cap) is the poetic voice (1 st person) Different audience than the fairytale Sly attitude FairytalePoem Young girl tricked by a wolf ends up being eaten but later saved by a woodcutter Girl sheltered by mother -given specific instructions for behavior Doesn’t make right decision when talks to wolf Girl portrayed as young and foolish Male dominance over women Wolf is the villain Simplistic idea of good vs. bad Girl’s transition out of childhood Uses wolf as guidance Falls in love with wolf Loses innocence when ventures into woods Wolf is good Story based on success of Character Grandma is a mute character Girl ends up making move on wolf

6 Figurative Meaning Extended Allusion to Little Red Riding hood “What big ears/he had! What big eyes he had! What teeth!” (9/10) Loss of innocence: “my stockings ripped to shreds, scraps of red from my blazer/ snagged on twig and branch, murder clues. I lost both shoes.” (17/18) Autobiographical Carol Ann Duffy met poet Adrian Henri at a poetry reading She was 16 (he was 23 years older) “Sweet sixteen, never been, babe, waif” (12) 10 year relationship “but then I was young—and it took ten years “ (31) Passion for learning and literature “Here’s why. Poetry.” (13) “a whole wall was crimson, gold, aglow with books./ Words, words were truly alive on the tongue, in the head” (28/29) She is interested in what the wolf can teach her “The wolf, I knew, would lead me deep into the woods,/ away from home, to a dark tangled thorny place/ lit by the eyes of owls.” (14/15/16) Wolf is a poet (male dominated literary world/ Adrian Henri) “reading his verse out loud/in his wolfy drawl” (7/8)

7 Feminism In order to find the truth female character has to be dominant Character swap “In the interval, I made quite sure he spotted me,/sweet sixteen, never been, babe, waif, and bought me a drink” (11/12) Character’s transition out of childhood/ Growing up Childhood as a place she is leaving “At childhood’s end” (1) Boundary is where wolf is “till you came at last to the edge of the woods./ It was there that I first clapped eyes on the wolf.” (5/6) Age “Sweet sixteen, never been, babe, waif” (12) “red wine staining his bearded jaw” (9) 10 year relationship helps her transition into adulthood “but then I was young—and it took ten years / in the woods“ (31) “Out of the forest I come with my flowers, singing, all alone.” (42)

8 Literary Devices Visual Imagery “The wolf, I knew, would lead me deep into the woods,/ away from home, to a dark tangled thorny place/lit by the eyes of owls.” (14/15/16) Giving up secure familiarity of home for unknown world of sex and literature Symbolism (exchange) The owl White dove “went in search of a living bird - white dove - / which flew, straight, from my hands to his open mouth./One bite, dead.” (24/25/26) Grandmother’s bones Enjambment “and bought me a drink,//my first. You might ask why” (12/13) “went in search of a living bird - white dove - //which flew, straight, from my hands to his open mouth./One bite, dead.” (24/25) Asyndeton (enumeration) Words, words were truly alive on the tongue, in the head,/warm, beating, frantic, winged; music and blood.” (29/30) “year in, year out,/ season after season, same rhyme, same reason.” (35/36)

9 Discussion Questions What are your thoughts regarding poetry as a seductive mechanism? How does Carol Ann Duffy include poetry as a lure? What do you think the murder of the wolf in the end of the poem represent?

10 Sources http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/LittRed.shtml http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Revision:Carol_Ann_Duffy_-_Words_Wife http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=8&cad=rja&ved=0CFEQFjAH&url=http%3A%2F%2Fclc2.uniservi ty.com%2FGroupDownloadFile.asp%3FGroupId%3D333916%26ResourceId%3D2764228&ei=i81jULj- KOLx0gHS3IDAAQ&usg=AFQjCNGt_5OvXxtmQK9cmnomamSAln23ig&sig2=ABb53AbN-HsdMuz4Szbw2g http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=8&cad=rja&ved=0CFEQFjAH&url=http%3A%2F%2Fclc2.uniservi ty.com%2FGroupDownloadFile.asp%3FGroupId%3D333916%26ResourceId%3D2764228&ei=i81jULj- KOLx0gHS3IDAAQ&usg=AFQjCNGt_5OvXxtmQK9cmnomamSAln23ig&sig2=ABb53AbN-HsdMuz4Szbw2g http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2002/aug/31/featuresreviews.guardianreview8


Download ppt "Taís Colavolpe Little Red Cap. At childhood’s end, the houses petered out into playing fields, the factory, allotments kept, like mistresses, by kneeling."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google