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DA Civilian Resiliency Training Part III (Perspective, Resilience & Strength)

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Presentation on theme: "DA Civilian Resiliency Training Part III (Perspective, Resilience & Strength)"— Presentation transcript:

1 DA Civilian Resiliency Training Part III (Perspective, Resilience & Strength)

2 Mission and Vision 2 Mission: Develop a strong, resilient workforce (Soldier and Civilians) through resiliency training. End state: Sustain a resilient workforce that stands shoulder to shoulder, able overcome challenges and bounce back from adversity

3 Task: Use Put it in Perspective to stop catastrophic thinking, reduce anxiety, and improve problem solving by identifying Worst, Best, and Most Likely outcomes of a situation. Conditions: Within a classroom environment. Standards: Understand that optimism is a primary target of Put it in Perspective Task, Conditions, Standards 3

4 Put It In Perspective You are here 4

5 PIIP: Key Principles 5 Catastrophizing depletes energy: Catastrophizing depletes energy, stops problem solving, and generates unhelpful anxiety. Order matters: Stop catastrophizing by looking at the Worst, then generating the Best—both of which help you to focus on the Most Likely. Make a plan: Once you are focused on the Most Likely, create a plan for dealing with the situation. Optimism: PIIP builds all of the MRT competencies; Optimism is a primary target.

6 Bottom Line Up Front Put It In Perspective (PIIP) helps to build Optimism. Catastrophizing is when you waste critical energy ruminating about the irrational worst case outcomes of a situation, which prevents you from taking purposeful action. The goal of PIIP is to lower anxiety so that you can accurately assess the situation and deal with it. 6

7 What is catastrophizing? Catastrophizing is when you waste critical energy ruminating about the irrational worst case outcomes of a situation. This is NOT the same as identifying the worst case and contingency planning. Contingency planning is productive. Catastrophizing is counterproductive. Catastrophizing is a slippery slope. It’s downward-spiral thinking. Catastrophizing creates high levels of anxiety, decreases focus, and increases helplessness. It prevents you from taking purposeful action. 7

8 What’s the goal? The goal of PIIP is to lower anxiety so that you can accurately assess the situation and deal with it. The goal is NOT to pretend “all is well,” to deny real problems, or to take away anxiety completely. 8

9 Put It In Perspective Steps 9 Step 1: List worst case outcomes. Step 2: List best case outcomes. Step 3: List most likely outcomes. Step 4: Identify plan for dealing with most likely.

10 Scenario 10 After being counseled by your boss (as a Division) in regards to time management, your late for work the very next day.

11 Worst Case Scenario Thinking (WCST) 11 BLAST! The Boss is going to be mad! He’s going to make everyone in the Division come looking for me. The Civilians in the Division will turn against me AND I’ll get a negative counseling statement. I’ll have no support here. I’ll be moved from my position. I’ll never get another job in this economy. My family will be ashamed and want nothing to do with me. My girlfriend will dump me for someone who makes more money. I’ll never meet anyone else. I’ll end up alone and homeless and dead by age 25.

12 PIIP Step 1: WCST 12 List “Worst Case” as chain. Keep asking “And then what happens?” Don’t stop until you’ve exhausted what is running through your head. Rate your mood, focus, and energy level while you are in WCST.

13 Best Case Scenario Thinking (BCST) 13 When I arrive, I’ll see a few Civilians walking through the door to. They’re also late. They tell me I’m the only one who is late today. I pull it together and ensure I arrive at least 10 minutes prior from now on. The Boss will be pleased and compliment me.

14 PIIP Step 2: BCST 14 List “Best Case” as chain. Don’t stop until you run out of ideas. Rate your mood, focus, and energy level while in the midst of creating the positive outcomes.

15 Most Likely Scenario 15 They realize I’m generally always on time. I’ll call ahead and inform the team I’m running late. My co-workers will ride me about it. Once I arrive I’ll check-in with the Boss and inform him/her that I’ve arrived. He/she moves on to something else.

16 PIIP Step 3: Most Likely Scenario 16 List the Most Likely outcomes, focusing on emotions, behaviors, and other people. Check for accuracy. Move to different column, if necessary. Rate your mood, focus, and energy level while creating the Most Likely list. Develop plan for dealing with the Most Likely outcomes.

17 Develop a Plan of Action 17 I’ll backwards plan from now on. I’ll joke about it with my co-workers so they see I’m a good sport. I’ll make sure I’m on my game the next few days so the Boss can see I’m serious about being on time.

18 PIIP Step 4: Plan of Action 18 Develop a plan for dealing with the Most Likely outcomes. If necessary, briefly develop a plan for preventing Worst and increasing Best (BRIEFLY!)

19 Applications 19 What situations will PIIP be most helpful with? How can PIIP make you a better Civilian? How can PIIP help Civilians be more effective in coping with stress on and off work?

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21 Real Time Resilience

22 Task: Use Real Time Resilience to shut down counterproductive thinking to enable greater concentration and focus on the task at hand. Conditions: Within a classroom environment. Standards: Understand that optimism is a primary target of Real Time Resilience Task, Conditions, Standards 22

23 Real-time Resilience 23

24 Key Principles Practice: Real-time Resilience takes ongoing practice. Accuracy over speed: Focus on accuracy and passing the gut test, not speed. Learning curve: The pitfalls are common and part of the learning process. Do-over: When you hear a pitfall, pause and generate a stronger response. Optimism: Real-time Resilience builds all of the MRT competencies; Optimism is a primary target. 24

25 Bottom Line Up Front Real-time Resilience helps to build Optimism. Real-time Resilience involves proving your thoughts false with evidence, thinking optimistically, and putting the situation in perspective. Real-time Resilience is the skill of fighting back against counterproductive thoughts as soon as they occur so you remain task-focused and motivated. 25

26 Real-time Resilience Challenge counterproductive thoughts as they occur. Use it to get back to the task at hand. Use it to prepare for an anticipated Activating Event. This is an internal skill. This is not to be used out loud. This is not a tool for insubordination. 26

27 Applications When will Real-time Resilience be particularly helpful to you as a Soldier and as a family member? When would you NOT want to use Real-time Resilience? 27

28 Real-time Advanced Level Used when what you are saying to yourself is counterproductive Advanced level is accurate and fast. Advanced level uses: Evidence Optimism Put It In Perspective Advanced level requires practice, practice, practice! 28

29 Real-time Advanced Level: Demonstration 29

30 Real-time Resilience Advanced Level Demo Write down three words that capture what you just saw. 30

31 Real-time Pitfalls Common mistakes made while learning the skill Dismissing the grain of truth One time, one thing Minimizing the situation The situation does matter Rationalizing or excusing one’s contribution to a problem Take responsibility 31

32 Skill Building through Sentence Starters Use evidence to prove the thought is false. That’s not (completely) true because…. Generate a more optimistic way of seeing it. A more optimistic way of seeing this is... Put It In Perspective. The most likely implication is… and I can… 32

33 When would you use Real-time Resilience? What are examples of situations in which RTR will be most helpful to you? You were just chewed out by your Chief and now you have to go back and complete a mission. You are new to Human Resources and you have some self-doubt. You’ve just read an upsetting from home, and you have to get ready for your weekly briefing. You need to be calm. You’re about to go in front of a hiring board. You’re making the transition from work to home. You’ve got road rage. 33

34 Check on Learning What is the skill? Real-time Resilience (RTR) is an internal skill to shut down counterproductive thinking and build motivation and focus on the task at hand. When do I use it? Use RTR when your thoughts are distracting you from an immediate goal or task. How do I use it? Respond to your negative thoughts in the heat of the moment by providing evidence against the thought, by generating a more optimistic way of seeing it, or by Putting the thought In Perspective. Watch out for common pitfalls. 34

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36 Identify Strengths

37 Task: Identify strengths in yourself and others to recognize the best of yourself and the best of others. Conditions: Within a classroom environment. Standards: Understand that Strengths of Character is a primary target of Identifying Strengths in Self and Others Task, Conditions, Standards 37

38 Identify Strengths in Self and Others 38

39 Key Principles Know your strengths: Knowing your strengths is as important as knowing your weaknesses. Can’t have them all: No one can have all the strengths. Shadow side: Each strength has a shadow side that can get you in trouble or limit you. Strengths of Character: Identify Strengths in Self and Others builds all of the MRT competencies; Strengths of Character is a primary target. 39

40 Bottom Line Up Front Identify Strengths in Self and Others helps to build Strengths of Character. Knowing and using your strengths and the strengths of others will strengthen your unit’s effectiveness. 40

41 Applications As a Civilian, how can your knowledge of Character Strengths help you to be a more effective team member and to build stronger relationships? What strengths do you need to develop and/or shadow sides do you need to manage? How can you help cultivate a willingness to ask for help (in yourself or a friend/family member) by using a strengths perspective? How do you use strengths to rejuvenate? 41

42 Character Strengths Based on work by Chris Peterson and Martin Seligman This is the “Be” in the Be-Know-Do model of leadership. What is right with you? Who are you at your best? How are you already using your Signature Strengths (the strengths that best describe you)? How can you use your Signature Strengths to achieve optimal performance? How can you strengthen your unit through your focus on strengths? 42

43 All strengths are good… But we can’t have them all! All of us have top strengths and bottom strengths. Your top strengths are called your Signature Strengths. 43

44 Signature Strengths: In Your Bloodstream One believes that he/she is being “true to oneself” when using the strength. One feels that he/she can’t help but use the strength (when the opportunity to do so arises). When using the strength, one feels energized rather than exhausted. The motivation to use the strength comes from within the person. (No one else has to remind or persuade him/her to use it.) 44

45 Values in Action (VIA) Character Strengths Wisdom and Knowledge Curiosity/Interest Love of Learning Open-mindedness/Judgment Originality/Ingenuity/Creativity Perspective Courage Bravery/Valor Industry/Perseverance Integrity/Honesty Zest/Enthusiasm Humanity Love/Intimacy Kindness/Generosity/Nurturance Social Intelligence Justice Citizenship/Duty/Loyalty/ Teamwork Equity/Fairness Leadership Temperance Forgiveness/Mercy Modesty/Humility Prudence/Caution Self-control/Self-regulation Transcendence Appreciation of Excellence/Beauty Gratitude Hope/Optimism Humor/Playfulness Spirituality/Religiousness 45

46 Army Core Values are Character Strengths Loyalty Duty Respect Selfless Service Honor Integrity Personal Courage Soldier/Civilian Corps Creed 46

47 Distribution of Character Strengths among U.S. Adults Park, Peterson, & Seligman,

48 Name the Signature Strength… Name one or more of the Signature Strengths of the individuals presented. Refer to the Participant Guide for a list of strengths. 48

49 Chris Rock 49

50 Abraham Lincoln 50

51 Wile E. Coyote 51

52 Rosa Parks 52

53 POWs 53

54 Michael Jordan 54

55 Audie Murphy 55

56 Rocky Balboa 56

57 Bart Simpson 57

58 A Platoon 58

59 Leadership and Strengths “When you are commanding, leading [Soldiers] under conditions where physical exhaustion and privations must be ignored; where the lives of [Soldiers] may be sacrificed, then, the efficiency of your leadership will depend only to a minor degree on your tactical or technical ability. It will primarily be determined by your character, your reputation, not so much for courage–which will be accepted as a matter of course–but by the previous reputation you have established for fairness, for that high-minded patriotic purpose, that quality of unswerving determination to carry through any military task assigned you.” –General of the Army George C. Marshall (1941) from FM

60 Strengths What is one strength you consciously bring to your organization? What is one strength you want to bring more fully to your organization? 60

61 Check on Learning What is the skill? Identify Strengths in Self and Others to recognize the best of yourself and the best of others. When do I use it? Identify Strengths to deepen your awareness of your Signature Strengths and how you use your strengths as a leader and friend/family member. How do I use it? Assess your Signature Strengths using the VIA Strength Survey and identify ways you already use your Character Strengths. 61

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63 AAR What went well What can be improved


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