Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

R7.A.1.6.2 IDENTIFY EXAMPLES OF TEXT THAT SUPPORT ITS PURPOSE R7.B.1.1.1 INTERPRET RELATIONSHIPS AMONG CHARACTERS, SETTING, PLOT, AND THEME IN FICTION.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "R7.A.1.6.2 IDENTIFY EXAMPLES OF TEXT THAT SUPPORT ITS PURPOSE R7.B.1.1.1 INTERPRET RELATIONSHIPS AMONG CHARACTERS, SETTING, PLOT, AND THEME IN FICTION."— Presentation transcript:

1 R7.A IDENTIFY EXAMPLES OF TEXT THAT SUPPORT ITS PURPOSE R7.B INTERPRET RELATIONSHIPS AMONG CHARACTERS, SETTING, PLOT, AND THEME IN FICTION AND/OR NONFICTION Author’s Purpose and Setting

2 Author’s Purpose - His or her main reason for writing

3 Skills and Strategies you will learn: To recognize details that indicate the author’s purpose To use background information to determine the author’s purpose

4 Using the Skills and Strategies In this part you will learn to recognize the author’s purpose (or reason for writing). The author’s purpose influences what the author says and how he or she says it. You will practice using text clues and background knowledge to determine the author’s reasons for writing.

5 Some examples of clues to help you determine the author’s purpose Author’s PurposeClues To persuadeStrong language, favors one side of an issue To entertainSilly, humorous, suspenseful, exciting details To informFacts and details To reflect on an experience Descriptions, comments by the writer

6 WordDefinitionExample Sentence previousOccurring before in time or order The author’s previous works were more persuasive. recallTo call back; rememberCan you recall the story details? backgroundA person’s experience or knowledge The author’s background influences the setting of the story. establishDetermine; make sure of Knowing the author’s background helped establish the author’s purpose priorComing before in time; earlier Prior to reading the story, we learned about the author.

7 Reading Skill – Author’s Purpose Fiction writers may write for a variety of purposes. They may wish to entertain, to teach, to call to action, or to reflect on experiences. Recognizing details that indicate the author’s purpose can give you a rich understanding of a text. As you read, use a chart like the one shown to note details from the story that fit the different possible purposes of the author.

8 EntertainTeachReflect Funny details or details that create interest ExplanationsDetails that create a mood

9 Literary Analysis - Setting The setting of a story is the time and place of the action. In this example, the details in italics help establish the story’s setting: As night fell, the hungry raccoons roamed the forest for food. In some stories, setting is just a backdrop. The same story events could take place in a completely different setting In other stories, setting is very important. It develops a specific atmosphere or mood in the story. The setting may even relate directly to the story’s central conflict or problem.

10 BY: RAY BRADBURY All Summer in a Day

11 Background Venus: “All Summer in a Day” is set on Venus, the second planet from the sun. Today, we know that Venus has a surface temperature of almost 900 degrees Fahrenheit. In 1950, when Ray Bradbury wrote this story, some scientists believed that the clouds of Venus concealed a watery world. That information may have led Bradbury to create a setting of soggy jungles and constant rain.

12 Venus Venus is roughly equal in size to Earth. For this reason, it is sometimes called “Earth’s Twin.” Its climate and atmosphere, however, are unlike Earth’s, and it is unable to sustain life. The atmosphere is primarily carbon dioxide – the gas human beings exhale – and the atmospheric pressure is about ninety times greater than that of Earth. The clouds are around Venus that scientists one thought to be rain clouds are actually clouds of sulfuric acid.

13 Ray Bradbury As a boy, Ray Bradbury loved magicians, circuses, and science-fiction stories. He began writing his own imaginative tales and by the age of seventeen had his first story published in a magazine called Imagination! In 1950, Bradbury won fame for his book of science- fiction stories called The Martian Chronicles. One story describes how a group of Earthlings struggle on the rainy world of Venus. Bradbury began to wonder how a child might react to the sun’s brief appearance on Venus. Four years later, he answered his own question by writing “All Summer in a Day.”

14 Fast Facts about Ray Bradbury Many of Bradbury’s stories have been adapted for the television series The Twilight Zone He has served as a consultant to the Disney Company, the New York World’s Fair, and a number of architects.

15 Vocabulary Slackening – easing; becoming less active Vital – extremely important or necessary Tumultuously – Noisily and violent Resilient – Springing back into shape


Download ppt "R7.A.1.6.2 IDENTIFY EXAMPLES OF TEXT THAT SUPPORT ITS PURPOSE R7.B.1.1.1 INTERPRET RELATIONSHIPS AMONG CHARACTERS, SETTING, PLOT, AND THEME IN FICTION."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google