Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

LECTURE 18, NOVEMBER 2, 2010 ASTR 101, SECTION 2 INSTRUCTOR, JACK BRANDT 1ASTR 101-3, FALL 2010.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "LECTURE 18, NOVEMBER 2, 2010 ASTR 101, SECTION 2 INSTRUCTOR, JACK BRANDT 1ASTR 101-3, FALL 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 LECTURE 18, NOVEMBER 2, 2010 ASTR 101, SECTION 2 INSTRUCTOR, JACK BRANDT 1ASTR 101-3, FALL 2010

2 2

3 3

4 4

5 5

6 6

7 a) its core begins fusing iron. b) its supply of hydrogen is used up. c) the carbon core detonates, and it explodes as a Type I supernova. d) helium builds up in the core, while the hydrogen-burning shell expands. e) the core loses all of its neutrinos, so all fusion ceases. Question 3 The Sun will evolve away from the main sequence when

8 a) its core begins fusing iron. b) its supply of hydrogen is used up. c) the carbon core detonates, and it explodes as a Type I supernova. d) helium builds up in the core, while the hydrogen-burning shell expands. e) the core loses all of its neutrinos, so all fusion ceases. Question 3 The Sun will evolve away from the main sequence when When the Sun’s core becomes unstable and contracts, additional H fusion generates extra pressure, and the star will swell into a red giant.

9 ASTR 101-3, FALL 20109

10 10

11 ASTR 101-3, FALL

12 ASTR 101-3, FALL

13 ASTR 101-3, FALL

14 ASTR 101-3, FALL

15 a) red giants. b) pulsars. c) black holes. d) white dwarfs. e) red dwarfs. Question 1 Stars like our Sun will end their lives as

16 a) red giants. b) pulsars. c) black holes. d) white dwarfs. e) red dwarfs. Question 1 Stars like our Sun will end their lives as Low-mass stars eventually swell into red giants, and their cores later contract into white dwarfs.

17 ASTR 101-3, FALL

18 ASTR 101-3, FALL

19 a) an asteroid. b) a planet the size of Earth. c) a planet the size of Jupiter. d) an object the size of the Moon. e) an object the size of a sugar cube. Question 8 In a white dwarf, the mass of the Sun is packed into the volume of

20 a) an asteroid. b) a planet the size of Earth. c) a planet the size of Jupiter. d) an object the size of the Moon. e) an object the size of a sugar cube. Question 8 In a white dwarf, the mass of the Sun is packed into the volume of The density of a white dwarf is about a million times greater than normal solid matter.

21 ASTR 101-3, FALL

22 ASTR 101-3, FALL

23 ASTR 101-3, FALL

24 ASTR 101-3, FALL

25 a) mass transfer onto a white dwarf in a binary star system. b) repeated helium fusion flashes in red giants. c) rapid collapse of a protostar into a massive O star. d) the explosion of a low-mass star. e) the birth of a massive star in a new cluster. Question 11 A nova involves

26 a) mass transfer onto a white dwarf in a binary star system. b) repeated helium fusion flashes in red giants. c) rapid collapse of a protostar into a massive O star. d) the explosion of a low-mass star. e) the birth of a massive star in a new cluster. Question 11 A nova involves Sudden, rapid fusion of new fuel dumped onto a white dwarf causes the star to flare up, and for a short time become much brighter.

27 ASTR 101-3, FALL

28 ASTR 101-3, FALL

29 ASTR 101-3, FALL

30 ASTR 101-3, FALL

31 ASTR 101-3, FALL

32 a) the number of main sequence stars. b) the ratio of giants to supergiants. c) the luminosity of stars at the turnoff point. d) the number of white dwarfs. e) supernova explosions. Question 6 Astronomers determine the age of star clusters by observing

33 a) the number of main sequence stars. b) the ratio of giants to supergiants. c) the luminosity of stars at the turnoff point. d) the number of white dwarfs. e) supernova explosions. Question 6 Astronomers determine the age of star clusters by observing The H–R diagram of a cluster can indicate its approximate age. Turnoff point from the main sequence

34 ASTR 101-3, FALL

35 ASTR 101-3, FALL

36 ASTR 101-3, FALL

37 a) as a protostar. b) as a red giant. c) as a main-sequence star. d) as a white dwarf. e) evolving from type O to type M. Question 10 A star will spend most of its “shining” lifetime

38 a) as a protostar. b) as a red giant. c) as a main-sequence star. d) as a white dwarf. e) evolving from type O to type M. Question 10 A star will spend most of its “shining” lifetime In the main-sequence stage, hydrogen fuses to helium. Pressure from light and heat pushing out balances gravitational pressure pushing inward.

39 ASTR 101-3, FALL


Download ppt "LECTURE 18, NOVEMBER 2, 2010 ASTR 101, SECTION 2 INSTRUCTOR, JACK BRANDT 1ASTR 101-3, FALL 2010."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google