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What Does the Net Generation Expect From Us? SAC August 8, 2005 SAC August 8, 2005 Copyright © 2005, Joel L. Hartman. This work is the intellectual property.

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Presentation on theme: "What Does the Net Generation Expect From Us? SAC August 8, 2005 SAC August 8, 2005 Copyright © 2005, Joel L. Hartman. This work is the intellectual property."— Presentation transcript:

1 What Does the Net Generation Expect From Us? SAC August 8, 2005 SAC August 8, 2005 Copyright © 2005, Joel L. Hartman. This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate or otherwise to republish requires written permission from the author.

2 2

3 3 EDUCAUSE E-book First e-book project html, pdf, print Connects to EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative key themes

4 4 The Generations Matures ( b. <1946 ) Baby Boomers ( b ) Gen-Xers ( b ) Millennials (Net Gen) ( b ) Post-Millennials ( b ? )

5 5 Differences: More Than Age Social Economic Environmental Political Technological

6 6 Matures (pre-1946) Boomers (1946 – 1964) Gen X (1965 – 1980) Net Gen (1981 – 1994) Ozzie & Harriet Father Knows Best Bing Crosby The Movies Marvel Comics Grateful Dead Rock & Roll 3’s Company Mad Magazine Sesame Street Friends Heavy Metal Beavis & Butthead Computer Games Napster, etc. Netflix Entertainment

7 7 Matures (pre-1946) Boomers (1946 – 1964) Gen X (1965 – 1980) Net Gen (1981 – 1994) WW II Korean Conflict New Deal Great Depression Rural Life Extended Families Respect Authority Duty Before Pleasure JFK Assassination Civil Rights Movement Economic Expansion Move to Suburbia Nuclear Families Fallout Shelters Buy Now—Pay Later Personal Fulfillment Watergate Social Chaos Vietnam AIDS Downsizing Divorced Families Latchkey Kids Work to Live Oklahoma Bombing 9/11 Terrorism Diversity Economic Expansion Online Communities Earn to Spend Social Markers

8 8 Matures (pre-1946) Boomers (1946 – 1964) Gen X (1965 – 1980) Net Gen (1981 – 1994) Golden Age of Radio 78RPM Records Operators-Party Lines ENIAC TV FM Stereo Mainframes PLATO BASIC/DTSS LP Records Video Games Lunar Landing ARPANET UNIX Ethernet Apple/Microsoft CDs The Web Space Shuttle Internet MP3 DVD Windows/Macintosh Mobile Devices IM, Blogs Technology is Anything Invented After You Were Born

9 9 What Do the Net Gen Consider Technology? To me, technology is… “…an effective tool to present quality presentations, and develop great communication with other students and professionals in the same field.” ~ Sandra Basanti, Marymount University

10 10 The Net Gen Speak “…reformatting my computer system and installing cutting edge software that allows me to do what I want, when I want, without restrictions, viruses, and rules of Bill Gates.” ~Jody Butler, Idaho State University “…ability to adapt and configure and already established program to benefits me daily, be it, customizing weather bug to state the weather in my particular region, or formatting my cell phone pad to recognize commonly used phrases in text messaging.” ~ Christopher Bourges, Duke University

11 11 Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants Today’s students are “native speakers” of the digital language of computers, video games, and the Internet They process information and act differently than previous generations Digital immigrants have had to adapt; their “accents” are discernable – Prensky, 2001

12 12 By Age 21, The Average Person Will Have Spent… 20,000 hours watching TV 10,000 hours on a cell phone Under 5,000 hours reading Sent/received 200,000 s 10,000 hours playing video games – Prensky, 2003

13 13 College Internet Use 60% believe the Internet has improved relationships with classmates 56% believe the Internet has improved relationship with professors 46% say Internet allows them to express ideas that they would not have expressed in class – Jones, 2002

14 14 College Internet Use 79% say Internet has had a positive impact on academic experience 73% use the Internet more than the library for research 72% check every day – Jones, 2002

15 15 Pre-College Internet Use 87% of teens use the Internet; 51% go online daily 81% play online games 76% get news online 43% make purchases online 75% use IM; 48% do so daily – Lenhart, 2005

16 16 Pre-College Internet Use something you use to talk to “old people” IM: something you use to talk with friends Nearly half of teens have cell phones, and a third are texting Landline phone used most often – Lenhart, 2005

17 17 Games 69% have of students have played games since elementary school 77% of students have played games by high school 100% have experienced games by college --Jones, 2003

18 18 Games 60% of college students are regular game players 29 is the average age of a game player $9.9 billion computer and video game sales in Jones, 2003

19 19 Rising Expectations Rising expectations of technology-literate students difficult to meet Service expectations ― Amazon.com, Ebay, and Google are their models ― Immediacy, self-service, customization Students want engaging learning experiences Satisfaction levels decreasing

20 20 General Characteristics of The Net Generation Always Connected Multi-Tasking Resourceful Inquisitive Customize Independent and Interdependent

21 21 Students Who Were Very Satisfied by Generation 55% 38% 26% Boomer n=328 Generation-X n=815 Millennial n=346 Percent --Dziuban, 2005

22 22 Better Able to Integrate Technology Into Their Learning Percent 67% 48% 34% Boomer n=328 Generation-X n=815 Millennial n=346 --Dziuban, 2005

23 23 College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST) English Scores n=1,268n=8,861n=6,164 --Dziuban, 2005

24 24 College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST) Math Scores n=1,266n=8,860n=6,163 --Dziuban, 2005

25 25 Net Gen Attitudes and Behavior Play Out in Multiple Campus Settings: SOCIAL SERVICES ACADEMIC

26 26 Academic PDAs, phones, laptops in the classroom Expectations of faculty and what constitutes good teaching (see: ratemyprofessor.com) Smart classrooms, flexible learning spaces Library Intellectual property; ethics

27 27 Learning Expectations of the Net Generation “Good Teaching is Universal” Characteristics of Good Teaching Engage students in subject matter Ability to communicate effectively Participatory learning (integrating secondary sources to foster a better understanding) Fair treatment of students

28 28 The Net Gen Speak “To me, a good teacher is someone who is an expert in their field/industry, and is able to convey and apply their expertise in the classroom. “ ~ Heena Shabbir, American University “A good teacher has an innate knowledge of their field, and can effectively convey this knowledge in more than one way, which keeps the class interesting.” ~ Frank Fellecetti III, SUNY Oswego “I love when I come back from a class, where my professors knowledge of a particular field is astonishing.” ~ Samuel Bass- Southwest Missouri State

29 29 The Net Gen Speak “Yes, PowerPoint is good and all, but I hate when teachers overuse a software package, like PowerPoint and think they have used technology to enhance a particular topic. Overusing anything is not useful to me in a classroom environment!” ~Warren Ng- University of Colorado “What is the point of placing an entire course curriculum on PowerPoint slides, and then making those slides available on the internet, and then....require students to come to class, and listen to the teacher only read through PowerPoint slides that we already have read through, remember they were available online?” ~ Nicole Galinat- Stetson University

30 30 Net Gen Classroom Learning Expectations Enjoy courses where the professor has an equal amount of traditional lecturing, as well as interactive learning Interactive learning may be defined as a group project, or working as a team for a particular in-class assignment, watching video clips, using PowerPoint, or accessing course material via the internet.

31 31 Services Stovepipe service units Bureaucratic run-around Expectation that everything is online Google and eBay set their standards

32 32 Net Gen Service Expectations Other public sites, such as Amazon, Google, Yahoo, and MSN serve as a frame of reference to compare an institution’s technology services, such as: Internet ports in each dorm room Basic wireless services available in public halls (dining, student union, academic buildings) Discounted software packages (Windows XP, Microsoft Office) Sufficient bandwidth to send large documents back and forth seamlessly Help Desk to help trouble shoot when problems occur

33 33 Why Do the Net Gen Expect This? Many institutions incorporate a technology cost into their fees each year, the expectation is whether the services that the Net Gen are exclusively used or not, so long as they have these recommended services as a resource the basic expectation is being met.

34 34 Social The social element is integrated with all the rest Like “schools of fish” Thefacebook, friendster

35 35 Net Gens and Social Life Defining Characteristic of the Net Generation is the constant need to be connected Internet services (AIM, thefacebook, etc.) help us stay connected Multi-tasking allows Net Geners communicate with numerous friends, when trying to plan an event

36 “Today’s students are no longer the people our educational system was designed to teach.” ―Prensky, 2001

37 37 Increasing Gap Between the tools and resources we are deploying and those selected and used by Net Gen students Between us and them in regard to the way these tools and resources are used

38 38 What Can We Do About This? Talk with and observe our students Read about the “generations effect” Develop contexts for Net Gen students to integrate their tools of choice into our education, research, and services environments

39 39 The Freshman Mindset --Beloit College, 2003 & 2004 Paul Newman has always made salad dressing Bert and Ernie are old enough to be their parents Gas has always been unleaded Oliver North has always been a talk show host

40 40 Discussion Session 1:00 – 2:30 p.m.

41 41 Contact Information Joel L. Hartman Vice Provost for Information Technologies & Resources University of Central Florida Gregory R. Roberts SI International

42 42 Copyright © 2005, Joel L. Hartman. This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate or otherwise to republish requires written permission from the author.


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