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Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 Abnormal Psychology Fourth Edition Oltmanns and Emery.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 Abnormal Psychology Fourth Edition Oltmanns and Emery."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 Abnormal Psychology Fourth Edition Oltmanns and Emery

2 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 PowerPoint Presentation Prepared By Fred W. Whitford Montana State University

3 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 Chapter 18 Mental Health and the Law This multimedia product and its contents are protected under copyright law. The following are prohibited by law: any public performance or display, including transmission of any image over a network; preparation of any derivative work, including the extraction, in whole or in part, of any images; any rental, lease, or lending of the program.

4 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 Case Study:Case Study: –John Hinckley and the Insanity Defense *Overview

5 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 Expert WitnessesExpert Witnesses Free Will Versus DeterminismFree Will Versus Determinism –Criminal Responsibility –Insanity Rights and ResponsibilitiesRights and Responsibilities –Szasz *Overview

6 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 Not Guilty by Reason of InsanityNot Guilty by Reason of Insanity Incompetent to Stand TrialIncompetent to Stand Trial Mitigating FactorsMitigating Factors* Mental Illness and Criminal Responsibility

7 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 The Insanity Defense –MNaghten Test –Irresistible Impulse and the Product Test Parson v. StateParson v. State Durham v. United StatesDurham v. United States –Legislative Actions * Mental Illness and Criminal Responsibility

8 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 –Guilty But Mentally Ill (GBMI) –Burden of Proof –Defining Mental Disease or Defect –Use and Consequences of the Insanity Defense * Mental Illness and Criminal Responsibility

9 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004* Development in the Insanity Defense

10 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 Further Thoughts:Further Thoughts: –The Battered Women Syndrome as a Defense * Mental Illness and Criminal Responsibility

11 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 Competence to Stand TrialCompetence to Stand Trial –Competence Dusky v. United StatesDusky v. United States Miranda WarningMiranda Warning Sentencing and Mental HealthSentencing and Mental Health –Mitigating Factors Atkins v. VirginiaAtkins v. Virginia Kansas v. HendricksKansas v. Hendricks* Mental Illness and Criminal Responsibility

12 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 A Brief History of U.S. Mental HospitalsA Brief History of U.S. Mental Hospitals –Moral Treatment –Deinstitutionalization Movement * Mental Health and Civil Law

13 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 Libertarianism Versus Paternalism in Treating Mental PatientsLibertarianism Versus Paternalism in Treating Mental Patients Civil CommitmentCivil Commitment –Parens Patriae –Police Power * Mental Health and Civil Law

14 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 –Grounds and Procedures Emergency Commitment ProceduresEmergency Commitment Procedures Formal Commitment ProceduresFormal Commitment Procedures –Inability to Care for Self –Being Dangerous to Self –Being Dangerous to Others »Kansas v. Hendricks * Mental Health and Civil Law

15 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 –Predicting Dangerousness and Suicidal Risk Predicting DangerousnessPredicting Dangerousness –Clinical Assessment of Dangerousness Base RatesBase Rates Assessing Suicide RiskAssessing Suicide Risk –Commitment of Minors Parham v. J.R.Parham v. J.R.* Mental Health and Civil Law

16 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004* Mental Health and Violence

17 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 The Rights of Mental PatientsThe Rights of Mental Patients –The Right to Treatment Wyatt v. StickneyWyatt v. Stickney OConnor v. DonaldsonOConnor v. Donaldson* Mental Health and Civil Law

18 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 –Treatment in the Least Restrictive Alternative Environment Lake v. CameronLake v. Cameron Olmstead v. L.C.Olmstead v. L.C.* Mental Health and Civil Law

19 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 –The Right to Refuse Treatment Informed ConsentInformed Consent –Washington v. Harper –Riggins v. Nevada Almost a RevolutionAlmost a Revolution –Outpatient Commitment * Mental Health and Civil Law

20 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 Research Methods:Research Methods: –Base Rate and Predictions * Mental Health and Civil Law

21 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 DeinstitutionalizationDeinstitutionalization –The Case for Paternalism * Mental Health and Civil Law

22 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 Children, Parents, and the StateChildren, Parents, and the State Child Custody DisputesChild Custody Disputes –Child Custody –Expert Witnesses in Custody Determinations –Divorce Mediation * Mental Health and Family Law

23 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 A Brief Case Study:A Brief Case Study: –Jim and Suzanne * Mental Health and Family Law

24 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 Child AbuseChild Abuse –Physical Child Abuse –Child Sexual Abuse –Child Neglect –Munchausen-by-Proxy Syndrome (MBPS) –Termination of Parental Rights * Mental Health and Family Law

25 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 Professional Negligence and MalpracticeProfessional Negligence and Malpractice –Informed Consent on Alternative Treatments: Osheroff v. Chestnut Lodge Informed ConsentInformed Consent –Who is the Client? * Professional Responsibilities and the Law

26 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 ConfidentialityConfidentiality –Privileged Communications Tarasoff v. Regents of the University of CaliforniaTarasoff v. Regents of the University of California –Tarasoff and the Duty to Protect Potential Victims * Professional Responsibilities and the Law

27 Copyright Prentice Hall 2004 Getting HelpGetting Help* Professional Responsibilities and the Law


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