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1 JoAnne C. Juett, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Scientific and Technical Writing, English Department Instructional Technology Fellow, Center for Excellence.

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Presentation on theme: "1 JoAnne C. Juett, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Scientific and Technical Writing, English Department Instructional Technology Fellow, Center for Excellence."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 JoAnne C. Juett, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Scientific and Technical Writing, English Department Instructional Technology Fellow, Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

2 Blended Learning: Mixing the Real and the Virtual A combination of face-to-face (F2F) and online learning for a course Synchronous and asynchronous learning Real-time, real-space (in-classroom) and virtual (online) Unique sequencing but integrated May involve uses of mobile devices in ambient space (virtual-enhanced reality) DEFINITION (what BL is)

3 DEFINITION (purpose) Blended Learning is combining multiple learning components and learning events to create a meaningful learning experience.

4 The thoughtful integration of face-to-face classroom (spontaneous verbal discourse) and Internet based (reflective text-based discourse) learning opportunities Not an add-on to a classroom lecture nor an online course; fundamental redesign An optimal (re)design approach to enhance and extend learning by rethinking and restructuring class contact hours. DEFINITION (design)

5 Why Blended Learning? Increased flexibility in learning

6 Why Flexibility in Learning? With the increasing use of a variety of approaches for learning in the information age Learners' preferences are changing from wanting to be taught mostly in lectures or direct training sessions To wanting increased flexibility.

7 Why Flexibility in Learning? Today, learners want to have more say in WHAT they learn WHEN they learn WHERE they learn, and HOW they learn Can we do what learners want?

8 8 Components of the Blend Online Component Significant portion of the class time Enabling dispersed students to attend Face to Face Component On Campus Or another Agreed-upon Location Many possible Variations Blending together these components to leverage new learning opportunities that are neither online nor campus-limited

9 9 New Learning Opportunities via the Blend What new learning models can be leveraged by blended approach? Alternative locations Alternative events Alternative scheduling Preparation/Reflection/Research wrap-around through the online mode

10 Components of Blended Learning 1. Synchronous (live) Classroom format 2. Synchronous (live) online format 3. Asynchronous (not live) self-paced format

11 Components of Blended Learning Face-to-face Tutoring Coaching or Mentoring Sessions Classroom Workshops Conferences Meetings Labs 1. Synchronous Physical/Face-to-Face Components (not limited to)

12 Components of Blended Learning Internet conferencing Audio Conferencing (i.e., phone conferencing) Live Video via satellite or Videoconferencing Virtual Online Classroom Instant Messaging 2. Synchronous Electronic Components (not limited to)

13 Components of Blended Learning On-line self-paced Learning Content (Web pages) , Discussion Forums EPSS (Electronic Support Systems) & Job Aids Web/Computer-Based instruction Books Articles CD-ROM Audio (disc/tape) Video (disc/tape) White papers Archived Live Events 3. Asynchronous Components (not limited to)

14 Components of Blended Learning Within the scope of today’s presentation, let’s review some advantages and disadvantages of few synchronous and asynchronous components of blended learning.

15 Advantages and Disadvantages of Blended Learning Components Motivation Responsiveness Experiences Team Building Disadvantages of Classroom Instructor Scheduling Audience Travel Physical Advantages of Classroom

16 Advantages and Disadvantages of Blended Learning Components Learn anytime, anywhere Time savings Cost Efficient Learner control Disadvantages of Self-Paced on-line Bandwidth Interaction Development Cost Drop-Outs Advantages of Self-Paced on-line

17 Advantages and Disadvantages of Blended Learning Components More Engaging No Internet Connection Disadvantages of CD-ROM Content Peer-to-Peer Development Advantages of CD-ROM

18 Advantages and Disadvantages of Blended Learning Components Savings Participation Visual Disadvantages of Videoconferencing Quality Technical Support Advantages of Videoconferencing

19 Dimensions of the Blend? A blended learning program may combine one or more of the following dimensions: 1. Blending Offline and Online Learning 2. Blending Self-Paced and Live, Collaborative Learning 3. Blending Structured and Unstructured Learning 4. Blending Custom Content with Off-the-Shelf Content 5. Blending Learning, Practice, and Performance Support

20 BEST PRACTICES IN BLENDED LEARNING

21 Best practices of blended learning Create learning objectives Start with what you want the students to learn Backward Design Create overall course objectives then create class/module objectives Clear idea—Be specific Utilize action verbs (Bloom’s Taxonomy) Use higher order thinking 21

22 Best practices of blended learning Create ways for students to learn before class Students are capable Find ways to motivate prior to class PowerPoint Interactive web activities Pre-class writing activities Homework problems Use technology to leverage student interest Bloom’s Taxonomy: Original terms: Knowledge & Comprehension New Terms: Remembering & Understanding (Pohl, 2000) 22

23 Create ways for students to learn during class Students need your skills at creating learning opportunities Examples: Group work Learning activities Questions Discussions Mini lectures 23 Best practices of blended learning

24 Create ways for students to learn after class Students need to rehearse content Encourage meaningful interaction with the material Examples: Short writing assignments Online quizzes Homework problems Classroom assessment techniques 24 Best practices of blended learning

25 Communication Use multiple forms Out of class: Course mail Wikis Blogs Cell phone or texting Asynchronous discussions Synchronous discussions 25 Best practices of blended learning

26 In class: Think-Pair-Share Discussions: Large group and Small group Debates Interviews Presentations 26 Best practices of blended learning

27 Encourage collaboration More collaboration=More course cohesiveness Assignments: Group Worksheets Group presentations Group Exams Jigsaw 27 Best practices of blended learning

28 Utilize Online Resources Take advantage of the wealth of information available via: Web Library resources: Research Databases, LibGuidesResearch DatabasesLibGuides Electronic books: Gale Virtual Reference LibraryGale Virtual Reference Library Online journalsOnline journals using Scholar Google YouTube Blogs Podcasts RSS Feeds [Real Simple Syndication] 28 Best practices of blended learning

29 Utilize both high and low stakes grading Students track their grades Offers the widest array of choices Low stakes: Small number of points Surveys Participation Writing assignments Quizzes High stakes: Large projects Presentations Research paper Discussions 29 Best practices of blended learning

30 Seek assistance from Professionals on Campus Distance Learning Faculty developers/Course Resource Archives Librarians Colleagues 30 Best practices of blended learning

31 Stay Organized Many components to blended learning—your organization will minimize student confusion When preparing for your blended course: Begin early Double the time you think it will take Work in small, manageable chunks Take breaks Keep a journal of your experience 31 Best practices of blended learning

32 EVALUATION OF TECHNOLOGICAL RESOURCES

33 Blogs: (Web Logs) form of online journal Strengths of the ResourcePotential Disadvantages Encourage skills of writing and self expression Mixed views about the added-value effectiveness Connections with other students Public-may discourage student contributions Automatic feedbackIf not maintained, may be abandoned Promote critical and analytical thinking Students become lurkers Must have strong motivation on part of users 33 Rudestam, K. & Schoenholtz-Read (2010). Handbook of Online Learning.

34 Wikis: Collaborative web-based site for sharing text and other resources Strengths of the ResourcePotential Disadvantages Easy to generate and alter or amend the text for collaborative purposes Ease of editing and unmonitored environment may lead to low level of content Can be closed or openLack of accuracy of wiki content— educate learners Requires little skill or trainingComplexity of site requires care in the construction of the navigation Encourages users to work in groups Great for brainstorming, problem solving, etc. Creates group cohesiveness 34 Rudestam, K. & Schoenholtz-Read (2010). Handbook of Online Learning.

35 Podcasting: Audio file that can be downloaded Strengths of the ResourcePotential Disadvantages Listen to material multiple timesShortcomings in providing complex and/or detailed information Flexibility and portabilityNot good at conveying details and facts Sight impaired studentsDifficult to browse Low-cost, low-barrier toolCopyright and searchability as number of podcasts increase Ideal for short, pre-class listening Great for “dead time” (walking & traveling) 35 Rudestam, K. & Schoenholtz-Read (2010). Handbook of Online Learning.

36 E-Portfolios: Electronic collections of documents supports what has been learned or achieved. Strengths of the ResourcePotential Disadvantages Portable, lifelong record of achievementCommunication element blurs the boundary Provides impetus for student to take ownership of their learning Instructors need to encourage reflective practice not just a “dumping ground” for coursework Encourages students to set their own goalsMajor compatibility issue when student changes institutions, graduates, and move to employment Can be used for group workIf used for assessment and accountability, students move from lifelong learning tool to a course requirement. Can be used for presentation or interview 36 Rudestam, K. & Schoenholtz-Read (2010). Handbook of Online Learning.

37 Additional free technologies… MERLOT: Repository MERLOT Questionform: questionform.com Survey Questionform Voki: Speaking Avatar Voki Go2Web20: Applications Go2Web20 Jing: Screen capture Jing Wiggio: wiggio.com/ Collaboration Wiggio Google Docs: Google---MoreCollaboration Google Docs PB Works: PB Works Concept Map: cmap.ihmc.us Concept mapping Concept Map Camstudio: video software Camstudio WebQuest: WebQuest: 37

38 More technologies…Some Free & Some Not SkypeSkype: Videoconferencing GroupboardGroupboard: Whiteboard BasecampBasecamp: Project collaboration LoosestitchLoosestitch: Online outliner ZaprZapr: https://www.zapr.com/ File sharing SlideshareSlideshare: Share PowerPoint CreatelyCreately: Draw diagrams & create outlines Podcast BlasterPodcast Blaster: Create podcast Survey MonkeySurvey Monkey: Create survey ScribdScribd: Document viewing on web GogrokGogrok: Live screen sharing DimdimDimdim: Webconferencing 38

39 39 Summary Blended learning can Bridge the gap for distant students Leverage events and other locations Extend the classroom Beyond the campus Beyond online Significant dimension beyond what we previously offered students Tapping professional and academic conferences and events

40 Thought… I tell you and you forget. I show you and you remember. I involve you and you understand. ---Eric Butterworth 40

41 REFERENCES Bubnick, Heather, et al. “Blended Learning.” 28 Oct Web. 25 Feb C7F07B467E1D/6764/Blendedlearning_October ppt Garrison, Randy D. and Norm Vaughn. “Inquiry and Blended Learning. 25 Feb Khan, Badrul Huda. Flexible Learning in an Information Society. Hershey, PA: Information Science Publishing, Schroeder, Ray. “Blended Learning: Creating New Learning Experiences.” Web. 25 Feb


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