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Let the humongosity begin!  As you may have already heard, ancient people would make marks to stand for the amounts of things. | | | |  That’s fine.

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Presentation on theme: "Let the humongosity begin!  As you may have already heard, ancient people would make marks to stand for the amounts of things. | | | |  That’s fine."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Let the humongosity begin!

3  As you may have already heard, ancient people would make marks to stand for the amounts of things. | | | |  That’s fine for a few things… but when you see | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | then understanding how much you have is a challenge.

4  We recycle the same ten symbols – but they’re worth more in a different position, in the same way that a ten dollar bill is worth more than a 1 dollar bill, even if the piece of paper is the same size.  This is the slide show for people who already know how to name numbers up to If you want to review that, go to the first slide show in this set, 094NamingSmallNumbers.

5  The fourth, fifth and sixth places in a decimal number stand for “thousands.”  1,000 is one thousand.  The three digits afterward mean that these digits don’t just stand for one puny thing – one goldfish, one bicycle or one sweaty sock – but they stand for a group of one thousand of whatever you’re counting. Thus, 6,000 means six *thousand* sweaty socks or goldfish.

6 (http://kokogiak.com/megapenny/default.asp )http://kokogiak.com/megapenny/default.asp

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8  If you want to see more pictures of lots and lots of things… 2/visualizing-billions.html 2/visualizing-billions.html

9  So… the numbers in the fourth fifth and sixth places are in the Thousand group. We can name that clump as if it were its own number, and then add “thousand” to it to show we’re really talking about something a thousand times as big.  In “proper math grammar,” we do not say “and,” since that’s reserved for adding things *less* than one (“one and a half” pounds or “one and 3 tenths of a mile”)  6,000 = six thousand

10  2,000 = two thousand  12,000 = twelve thousand  56,000= fifty-six thousand  100,000 = one hundred thousand’  232,000 = two hundred thirty two thousand  Read the smaller number in front of the comma, then add “thousand” to show how much it is worth based on its position.

11  208,000 = Two hundred eight thousand. There aren’t any tens… but we don’t say it. We still have to put that amount – none – in the space.  Four hundred six thousand = 406,000

12  Write these out in words.  34,000 ________________________  8,000 __________________________  18,000___________________________  111,000_______________________________  408,000 _______________________________

13  34,000 thirty-four thousand  8,000 eight thousand  18,000 eighteen thousand  111,000 one hundred eleven thousand *  408,000 four hundred eight thousand *  *leave out the “and” even if you thought it

14  Three hundred twenty-one thousand  Fifty-six thousand  One hundred thousand

15  Three hundred twenty-one thousand  321,000  Fifty-six thousand  56,000  One hundred thousand  100,000  … so, you read the digits in front of the comma as if they were the only digits there, then add “thousand” to show they are standing for something a thousand times as big.

16  998,000 = nine hundred ninety-eight thousand  999,000 = nine hundred ninety- nine thousand…  …. What’s next?  1,000, a THOUSAND THOUSAND.  But that’s not what we call it. Hey, it gets another comma, and its own name.  This is what a “million” is all about.

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18  3,000,000 is three million.  147,000,000 is one hundred forty-seven million.  Look for patterns Your turn to try these! Click when you’re ready to check the answers. 14,000,000 _________________ 100,000, ,000,000

19  14,000,000 fourteen million  100,000,000 a hundred million  244,000,000 two hundred forty-four million

20  Twelve million  Twenty million  Two hundred twenty-two million

21  Twelve million – 12,000,000  Twenty million – 20,000,000  Two hundred twenty-two million  222,000,000

22  Imagine a *thousand* rooms with a million dollar bills in them (like the picture of a million). That’s what a billion would look like. It would take a whole building.  In numbers, it looks like this:  1,000,000, one billion  345,000,000,000 – three hundred forty-five billion  801,000,000,000 – eight hundred one billion

23  45,000,000,000  100,000,000,000  727,000,000,000

24  45,000,000,000 Forty-five billion  100,000,000,000 one hundred billion  727,000,000,000 Seven hundred twenty-seven billion

25  Thirteen billion  Nine hundred ninety nine billion  One hundred eleven billion

26  Thirteen billion 13,000,000,000  Nine hundred ninety nine billion 999,000,000,000  One hundred eleven billion  111,000,000,000

27  Imagine a *thousand* buildings with a thousand rooms with a million dollar bills in them (like the picture of a million). That’s what a trillion would look like. It would take a whole block…  In numbers, it looks like this:  1,000,000,000, one trillion  335,000,000,000,000 – three hundred thirty- five trillion  601,000,000,000,000 – six hundred one trillion

28  3,000,000,000,000  17,000,000,000,000  111,000,000,000,000  532,000,000,000,000  901,000,000,000,000

29  3,000,000,000,000 three trillion  17,000,000,000,000 seventeen trillion  111,000,000,000,000 one hundred eleven trillion  532,000,000,000,000 five hundred thirty-two trillion  901,000,000,000,000 nine hundred one trillion

30  Five hundred sixty-five trillion  Nine trillion  Nine hundred trillion  Six hundred thirty-seven trillion  Two hundred three trillion

31  Five hundred sixty-five trillion 565,000,000,000,000  Nine trillion 9,000,000,000,000  Nine hundred trillion 900,000,000,000,000  Six hundred thirty-seven trillion 637,000,000,000,000  Two hundred three trillion 203,000,000,000,000

32  Thousands, millions, billions and trillions – let’s mix ‘em up.  You’ll need to figure out two things:  the name of the number that the group would be if it were all by itself  The name of the group to say afterwards…  56,000,000….  It’s “fifty-six” --- but with six zeroes afterwards, that makes it fifty-six million. 

33  413,000,000  21,000  5,000,000,000  101,000  65  65,000,000,000,000  307,000,000  91,000,000,000  610,000

34  413,000,000 four hundred thirteen million  21,000 twenty-one thousand  5,000,000,000 five billion  101,000 one hundred one thousand  65 sixty-five  65,000,000,000,000 sixty-five trillion  307,000,000 three hundred seven million  91,000,000,000 ninety-one billion  610,000 six hundred ten thousand

35  Seventeen billion  Ninety-seven million  Ninety-seven thousand  Two hundred eighty-five million  Two hundred eighty-five billion  Two hundred eighty-five trillion  Eighty-five thousand  Twelve billion

36  Seventeen billion 17,000,000,000  Ninety-seven million 97,000,000  Ninety-seven thousand 97,000  Two hundred eighty-five million 285,000,000  Two hundred eighty-five billion 285,000,000,000  Two hundred eighty-five trillion 285,000,000,000,000  Eighty-five thousand 85,000  Twelve billion 12,000,000,000

37  Next show will go over how to name large numbers that don’t have a lot of zeroes at the end.


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