Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

A cartoon by the American cartoonist Paul Carmack, published in the Christian Science Monitor, 11 August 1945. The Christian Science Monitor was not a.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "A cartoon by the American cartoonist Paul Carmack, published in the Christian Science Monitor, 11 August 1945. The Christian Science Monitor was not a."— Presentation transcript:

1 A cartoon by the American cartoonist Paul Carmack, published in the Christian Science Monitor, 11 August The Christian Science Monitor was not a religious newspaper; it was dedicated to 'nonhysterical journalism' (i.e. it tried to offer sensible and unbiased judgements on events).

2 What is the message of this cartoon?

3 To do this question, you need first to borrow two concepts from English: Denotation (what you see) Connotation (how it affects its audience) The Christian Science Monitor was not a religious newspaper; it was dedicated to 'nonhysterical journalism' (i.e. it tried to offer sensible and unbiased judgements on events). A cartoon by the American cartoonist Paul Carmack, published in the Christian Science Monitor, 11 August 1945.

4 Men sat talking round a table. ‘Getting round that table’ is an informal term for ‘negotiating’. Denotation Connotation Meaning Now the war is won, it will be time to negotiate the peace settlement for World War Two. The Christian Science Monitor was not a religious newspaper; it was dedicated to 'nonhysterical journalism' (i.e. it tried to offer sensible and unbiased judgements on events). A cartoon by the American cartoonist Paul Carmack, published in the Christian Science Monitor, 11 August 1945.

5 A bomb-shaped figure labelled ‘Atomic bomb’ looms over the negotiators. The figure is threatening – frightening. Denotation Connotation Meaning The existence of the atomic bomb has made the world a scarier place. The Christian Science Monitor was not a religious newspaper; it was dedicated to 'nonhysterical journalism' (i.e. it tried to offer sensible and unbiased judgements on events). A cartoon by the American cartoonist Paul Carmack, published in the Christian Science Monitor, 11 August 1945.

6 The bomb is saying: ‘A just and workable peace OR ELSE’. The ‘OR ELSE’ is the threat, and implies some terrible alternative if they get it wrong. Denotation Connotation Meaning Unless the peace-negotiators agree 'a just and workable peace', the next war the world will be plunged into will be an atomic war/ will be frighteningly destructive. The Christian Science Monitor was not a religious newspaper; it was dedicated to 'nonhysterical journalism' (i.e. it tried to offer sensible and unbiased judgements on events). A cartoon by the American cartoonist Paul Carmack, published in the Christian Science Monitor, 11 August 1945.

7 Finally, always remember to look at: Origin (who drew it) Date (when it was published) The Christian Science Monitor was not a religious newspaper; it was dedicated to 'nonhysterical journalism' (i.e. it tried to offer sensible and unbiased judgements on events). A cartoon by the American cartoonist Paul Carmack, published in the Christian Science Monitor, 11 August 1945.

8 11 August Just 5 days after Hiroshima. Date Details Significance This is a very early comment on the significance of the atomic bomb for international relations/ the peace negotiations. The Christian Science Monitor was not a religious newspaper; it was dedicated to 'nonhysterical journalism' (i.e. it tried to offer sensible and unbiased judgements on events). A cartoon by the American cartoonist Paul Carmack, published in the Christian Science Monitor, 11 August 1945.

9 The American cartoonist Paul R Carmack. Carmack was staff cartoonist for the Christian Science Monitor. Origin Details Significance This is American; it is a conscious attempt NOT to be biased or sensationalist – it is how serious, sensible Americans regarded the invention of the atomic bomb. The Christian Science Monitor was not a religious newspaper; it was dedicated to 'nonhysterical journalism' (i.e. it tried to offer sensible and unbiased judgements on events).


Download ppt "A cartoon by the American cartoonist Paul Carmack, published in the Christian Science Monitor, 11 August 1945. The Christian Science Monitor was not a."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google