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LEVERAGING TEACHING SCHOOLS AND A RESEARCH MINDSET TO IMPROVE STUDENT OUTCOMES AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT MICHAEL GOVES DOES RESEARCH HAVE A PROMINENT PLACE.

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Presentation on theme: "LEVERAGING TEACHING SCHOOLS AND A RESEARCH MINDSET TO IMPROVE STUDENT OUTCOMES AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT MICHAEL GOVES DOES RESEARCH HAVE A PROMINENT PLACE."— Presentation transcript:

1 LEVERAGING TEACHING SCHOOLS AND A RESEARCH MINDSET TO IMPROVE STUDENT OUTCOMES AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT MICHAEL GOVES DOES RESEARCH HAVE A PROMINENT PLACE IN EDUCATION? HOW EMBEDDED SHOULD PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES BE?

2 OVERVIEW  Reinforce the value of research in education.  Share barriers and solutions to research in education.  Share how the UK education system is changing.  Evaluate the need for sharing best practice.  Defining the scope of professional learning communities.  How research led communities can enhance staff/student development  Evaluate benefits and risks of professional learning communities

3 OfSTED: Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills SLT: Senior Leadership Team

4 NINE STRONG CLAIMS ABOUT PEDAGOGY: RESEARCH & REVIEW (HUSBANDS & PEARCE, 2012) 1. Give consideration to. 2. Focus on longer term learning outcomes as well as short term goals. 3. Depend on behaviour, knowledge and belief. 4. Use a range of approaches; whole class, structured group work and guided individual activity. 5. Embed as well as. 6. Make use of to develop higher order thinking and. 7. Are inclusive of the diverse needs of learners and student equity. 8. Build on pupils’ prior learning experience. 9. Scaffold pupil learning. pupil voice assessment for learning assessment for teaching metacognition dialogue & questioning

5 IS RESEARCH USEFUL?  Initial teacher education?  Teachers’ continuing professional development (CPD)?  School improvement?  International differences in engagement?  International differences in effectiveness? Most effective in…?

6 #2. THE CONTRIBUTION OF RESEARCH TO HIGH-PERFORMING SYSTEMS Singapore and Finland consistently ‘come out on top’.  Develop & embed capacity from the bottom up.  Rigorous research-based knowledge to inform their practice. Maria Teresa Tatto

7 #3. PHILOSOPHICAL REFLECTIONS ON THE CONTRIBUTION OF RESEARCH TO TEACHER EDUCATION  Inform and enhance teachers’ technical knowledge.  Rich reflection required in practical deliberation and professional judgement. Professional knowledge ≈ + technical knowledge + practical wisdom Christopher Winch, Janet Orchard and Alis Oancea critical reflection

8 #4. INTEGRATED ITE PROGRAMMES BASED ON ‘RESEARCH-INFORMED CLINICAL PRACTICE’  Make explicit the reasoning of experienced teachers.  Develop and extend decision-making capacities in student teachers.  Quality of the clinical experience that matters. Katharine Burn and Trevor Mutton

9 #5. THE CONTRIBUTION OF RESEARCH TO TEACHERS’ CPD  Engagement in collaborative enquiry.  Professional dialogue and reciprocal risk taking.  Let teachers explore why things do and don’t work in different contexts.  Create the conditions for enquiry-oriented teaching. Philippa Cordingley

10 #6. BUILDING COLLECTIVE CAPACITY FOR IMPROVEMENT AT A SCHOOL & SYSTEM LEVEL  Teachers matter, making the most difference for lower- achieving students.  Research has come centre stage as a pillar of school improvement.  Problematic in the absence of a co-ordinated strategy. Monica Mincu

11 BARRIERS 1.Particularly around lack of time 2.Capacity and commitment due to heavy workloads 3.Pressure to meet the demands of accountability 4.Expertise to conduct research effectively

12 RESEARCH AND OUR ROLE Question answer √ √ X X ? ? Experts on learning (metacognition)

13 STRESS  Value system: outcome and attainment? Progress? Well being?  Student wants success but experiences failure (why did I get this wrong?).  Teacher wants success but experiences failure (why don’t you understand?).  Real danger of devaluing our role/our value system…  Students (even parents) mirror our behaviours.  We both become frustrated and stressed etc etc  Understanding the ‘?’ could be more efficient by getting to the answer more quickly instead of eventually – building our confidence and value system

14 WHAT NEXT? vs

15 WHAT NEXT? Quality over Quantity: More ≠ Better! 1.National strategy 2.Research-informed clinical practice 3.All institutional settings Data use

16 SUMMARY SO FAR…  There is significant difference between excellent and poor teaching.  High performing systems make excellent use of data and research.  High performing educators make excellent use of data and research.

17 Variation across schoolsVariation within schools THE UK EDUCATION SYSTEM OECD, 2009

18 VARIATION AT EVERY LEVEL 1. Greater variation in effectiveness within a teacher’s sets than between groups of teachers’ classes. 2. Teachers tend to believe they are more effective with high-ability groups than with low-ability groups. National Teacher Enquiry Network (NTEN)

19 DEVELOPMENT WITHIN

20 FOCUS ON TEACHER DEVELOPMENT Sources of Variance in Student Achievement Source: Hattie (2003) Largest effect we can influence: the most efficient area to concentrate on.

21 START ………. SMALL

22 LESSON STUDY NTEN National Teacher Enquiry Network 1. Plan Plan a lesson together. Address each activity to your enquiry question and predict how pupils will react and how you will assess this. Pick 3 case pupils. 3. Reflect & Plan As soon after the lesson as possible, reflect how each activity elicited the sought-after change. Were your predictions correct? Why? 2. Observe Teach the lesson with your colleagues observing. Pay particular attention to the case pupils. Conduct any assessments and/or interviews during & after.

23 PILOT IN BIOLOGY Issue: Scientific literacy in year 12 students RQ: Is application of key terms more effective than defining key terms? Findings: 1) Application regime mean was higher (lower ability benefited the most). 2) Staff attitude to students’ learning was more positive; practice was more personalised, more reflective.

24 RANDOM CONTROL TRIALS: BARRIERS 1.The controls 2.Student ability over time As students get older, the range of achievement tends to increase (Black & William, 2007) 3.Sticking to the intervention 4.Concluding Effect size = the difference in mean achievement of the treatment and control groups population standard deviation

25 Randomised Control Trials Helsinki declaration Informed consent given All variables controlled for Trained staff Effect size significant Causal effect theorised Alternative regime untested Bias vs ethical questions Natural variation Training inconsistent Statistical question marks Causal effect contextualised only

26 QUALITY NOT QUANTITY Bad News:  You can’t control everything. Good News:  You don’t have to!

27 MAKING RESEARCH HAPPEN Centre for the Use of Research and Evidence in Education (CUREE)  Toolkits  Case studies  Resources  Continuum

28 MAKING RESEARCH HAPPEN Teachers Researchers Teaching Use expert help Build in time Contextualise findings

29 RANDOM CONTROL TRIALS: SOLUTIONS “If there is one thing more unethical than running a randomised trial, it’s not running the trial.” Tim Harford: Author of “The Undercover Economist Strikes Back”

30 SUMMARY SO FAR…  There is significant difference between excellent and poor teaching.  High performing systems make excellent use of data and research.  High performing educators make excellent use of data and research.  Variation is greater within than between – systems; schools; classrooms.  The process of research is often more valuable than the results it generates (critical reflection).

31 DEVELOPMENT ACROSS

32 National Support Schools Federations ACROSS SCHOOLS Improvement in 5 A*-Cs ( ) Academies in chain % point increase 3 or more

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34 ACROSS SCHOOLS “School-to-school support structures will become increasingly common…their effectiveness will be a critical determinant of school improvement.” Ofsted Annual Report 2010/11

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36 ACCOUNTABILITY: COLLABORATION VS ISOLATION Autonomy leads to ‘system wide’ success when combined with an emphasis on accountability. PISA in focus, October 2011 “While there were some exciting pockets of change they remained pockets.” Sustaining Developments in a De- centralised System, Lessons from New Zealand, 2003, p.3

37 ENTER: TEACHING SCHOOLS 1 Play a greater role in training new entrants to the profession. 2 Lead peer-to-peer professional and leadership development. 3 Identify and develop leadership potential. 4 Provide support for other schools. 5 Designate and broker Specialist Leaders of Education (SLEs). 6 Engage in research and development.

38 PROFESSOR CHRIS HUSBANDS, DIRECTOR, INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON Schools In Which High Performance Is The Norm PROVISIONCULTURES THE SETTING High expectations with a clear understanding of what excellence looks like A culture of coaching, mentoring and support PRACTICE Evidence, data and insight to inform practices An inquiry orientation: teaching as clinical practice LINKSTechnologies as ambient External research and development partners

39 FOREST WAY  Struggling special needs school in the midlands in 2008  Teaching School in 2011 (cohort one)  Second ‘outstanding’ rating by Ofsted in 2013  2014: leads an alliance of 45 schools (across all phases)  Annual health check for every alliance school  Beacon of best practice praised by National College of Teaching & Leadership Source: NCTL, Teaching school alliances: developing a school-led system (May 2014)

40 HARGREAVES MATURITY MODEL AIMHOW ACHIEVED JOINT PRACTISE Development across school research projectsHigh social capital TRUST develops when working together on common areasEvaluation & engagementReciprocal CHALLENGE is establishedDisciplined innovation Outcomes of innovation fed into CPD to ensure transfer

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42 Use technology wisely!

43 RESEARCH POSSIBILITIES IInvestigating the effects of online peer collaboration to improve attainment  Learning decay during extended holidays

44 SUMMARY SO FAR…  There is significant difference between excellent and poor teaching.  High performing systems make excellent use of data and research.  High performing educators make excellent use of data and research.  Variation is greater within than between – systems; schools; classrooms.  The process of research is often more valuable than the results it generates (critical reflection).  Schools supporting schools (system leadership) raises attainment and staff capability.  Barriers overcome by joint practise development and effective use of technology.

45 FINANCIALLY SUSTAINABLE?  Q: Fee-paying model versus revenue-generating courses?  A: Alliance dependent.  Develop staff (CPD).  Offer a leadership continuum.  Underpinned by research. Commitment to set a new professional standard for the benefit of students & staff

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48 TAKE AWAY POINTS  Aim to improve our own practice.  We know what issues we face.  Collaborate to solve them.  Simultaneously building our expertise and leadership potential.  Becoming more coordinated/efficient.  Raise the profile of our profession.  Future proof our students by valuing learning and learners.

49 SUMMARY SO FAR…  There is significant difference between excellent and poor teaching.  High performing systems make excellent use of data and research.  High performing educators make excellent use of data and research.  Variation is greater within than between – systems; schools; classrooms.  The process of research is often more valuable than the results it generates (critical reflection).  Schools supporting schools (system leadership) raises attainment and staff capability.  Barriers overcome by joint practise development and showing pedagogical value.  Progress is fluid: it evolves…start with why, then how, and be relentlessly determined.

50 SOURCES AND LINKS Nine strong claims about pedagogy: research and review (Husbands and Pearce 2012) The Role Of Research In Teacher Education: Reviewing The Evidence Interim Report Of The Bera-rsa Inquiry Leadership for a self-improving system (23 rd June 2012), Steve Munby, National College A Study of the impact of federation on student outcomes, National College, 2011 Teacher development: Sutton Trust: Hattie: Timperley (‘07): Robinson (‘09):


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