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AFRICA EDUCATION WATCH (AEW) PROJECT THE GHANA REPORT BY GHANA INTEGRITY INITIATIVE (GII) LOCAL CHAPTER OF TRANSPARENCY INTERNATIONAL 1.

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Presentation on theme: "AFRICA EDUCATION WATCH (AEW) PROJECT THE GHANA REPORT BY GHANA INTEGRITY INITIATIVE (GII) LOCAL CHAPTER OF TRANSPARENCY INTERNATIONAL 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 AFRICA EDUCATION WATCH (AEW) PROJECT THE GHANA REPORT BY GHANA INTEGRITY INITIATIVE (GII) LOCAL CHAPTER OF TRANSPARENCY INTERNATIONAL 1

2 ORDER OF PRESENTATION MAIN FINDINGS CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS 2

3 Findings - Cost and Quality of Education Affordability of Primary Education: –The low-income bracket of less than 893 parents out of the total sample 1020 reported that school was not expensive. –Even the majority of parents (458 out of 516) in GH¢100 per month also said that school was not expensive. 3

4 CONT‘D Meals were free but parents had to provide for textbooks, stationery, uniforms, transport, medicine/vaccination and outside activities; However, the highest amount paid per child to their schools during the period under review was below US$10 dollars. 4

5 COSTS OF T&L MATERIALS Most of the schools surveyed received textbooks, teachers’ manuals and stationery in 2006/2007 and 2007/2008; 669 (65%) reported that their children had received textbooks. However, only 52 parents paid for these books; 526 (51.5%) parents reported that their children had received stationery. However, only 36 paid for them. 5

6 COSTS OF T&L MATERIALS All the parents who reported paying for T&L materials paid less than the equivalent of US$ Thus, Primary education was considered largely affordable; However, parents with several children attending school will not find it affordable, especially if there are some at the higher level of the education ladder. 6

7 CONT‘D For example: 324 households reported having two children each in primary school; 231 households reported having three children each in primary school; 108 households reported having four children each in primary school may find it difficult; Parents with children each in other levels of education. 7

8 SCHOOL FEEDNG PROGRAMME Only 312 (30.6%) parents reported that their children were provided with meals. Out of this, 216 parents indicated that they would improve the quality of meals if they had the power; Parents whose children do not benefit called for an extension of the programme to cover them; Clearly inadequate in numbers and quality though a good programme. 8

9 DescriptionFrequency of payment Amount Paid (USD) Fees to the school for examination858 (84.1%)Below 25 Fees for private lessons by your child’s teacher 483 (47.4%)Below 25 Fees to PTA444 (43.5%)Below 25 Fees to the school for registration101 (9.9%)Below 25 Fees to use school’s facilities 65 (6.4%)Below 10 Unofficial payment or bribes to school authority 7 (0.7%)Below 4 Fees to allow child to pass into next grade 6 (0.6%)Below 4 9

10 Availability of school infrastructure 38 schools have 6 classrooms fully furnished with a wall, roof, blackboard, chairs and tables all in good condition throughout the year. 18 schools had less than 6 classrooms without basic infrastructure like a wall, roof, blackboard, chairs and tables and blackboards usable throughout the year 10

11 Teacher population and qualification All categories of the stakeholders surveyed complained about shortage of teachers and viewed it as a problem in the sixty schools surveyed. The breakdown is as follows: –124 heads of households, –19 PTA chairpersons. –16 heads of schools. 11

12 CONT‘D 25 (42%) heads of schools reported using unqualified teachers; 8 PTA chairpersons (13%) reported same 12

13 Average Class Size NoClassroom sizeNumber of schools 1Over 50 pupils per class16 2Between 40 – 50 pupils17 3Between 30 – 40 pupils pupils or less3 13

14 Access to Financial Information The survey showed that school financial management is not transparent. Only 27% of the parents reported that it was easy to know how much resources were allocated to the primary school. This was confirmed by 82% of the school heads who agreed that parents needed to have access to the school’s budget and expenditures. 14

15 School Governance Five directors were satisfied with the overall quality of the basic education provided by the schools in their districts; However, three district directors admitted that primary schools in their districts were not run very well due to inadequate resources Participation in school management can be achieved through the SMCs and the PTAs and/or directly by parents but this opportunity was used by many schools; All the schools surveyed had SMCs, some established as far back as

16 SCHOOL GOVERNANCE Five of the directors of education felt that parents should be involved in developing primary school plans They also agreed that parents can influence school decisions, and That complaints made by parents are taken seriously by the school authorities 16

17 SCHOOL GOVERNANCE However, 81% of parents surveyed visited the schools of the children only once in the last 12 months; Also, 83% of parents attended only one meeting in the last 12 months. 82% of parents were members of PTAs, 71% felt they can influence school decisions However, 43% did not know whether their children’s school had an SMC or not 17

18 LEAKAGES AND CORRUPTION A total of 430 (42.2% ) parents interviewed agreed with the assertion that the education system is affected by corruption. However, only 2% of the parents interviewed reported being aware of cases of embezzlement in their children’s schools. 18

19 CONT‘D One of the municipal/district directors strongly disagreed with the assertion that the education system was affected by corruption Two disagreed with the assertion that the education system was affected by corruption 19

20 PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED IN 2006/2007 Lack of or inadequate textbooks or other supplies; Lack of or inadequate toilet facilities; Overcrowded classrooms, poor condition of school buildings and classroom furniture; Unqualified and insufficient teachers as well as teacher absenteeism; Inability to pay school levies and for learning materials ; Use of children for household chores by teachers. (in the rural areas ) 20

21 CONT‘D According to the respondents, they complained to the PTA executives, Head teachers, and the District Assemblies. However, very little was done about the situation. Even though some respondents felt that “school is too expensive/unable to pay”, they did not complain because: –they did not know who to turn to, and/or –they knew they would not get a favourable response 21

22 Parents‘ Priority Areas for Education Provide reading materials and learning Aids Provide infrastructure for the school Improve on the quality of meals served Ensure discipline among teachers and pupils Provide furniture for the schools Increase salaries or improve the conditions of service for teachers. 22

23 RECOMMENDATIONS Sensitization of parents, particularly members of the SMCs and executive members of the PTAs on their rights and roles in school management so as to enable them participate more actively in school governance; Train SMC members in basic planning and financial management to contribute to school plans and track the application of school resources to reduce leakages and corruption 23

24 RECOMMENDATIONS Provide a sustained training for school heads to ensure proper record keeping and efficient use of school resources; Sanction head teachers who fail to keep proper records to ensure transparency and accountability in primary school financial management 24

25 RECOMMENDATIONS Provide more classrooms and furniture; Open new schools and/or As a last resort, run the shift system as school enrolment increases Train more teachers to make up the current shortfalls and provide for future increases in enrolment; Provide standardized training for non-professional teachers 25

26 WAY FORWARD Agree on findings and what to include in the final report Agree on the serious issues that need to be addressed; Policy reforms to pursue; Agree on what role GII and other CSOs can play; Meetings with school authorities in study areas; Finalization and publication of final report 26

27 WAY FORWARD Dissemination of assessment results to various stakeholders Training and sensitization of parents on their roles and responsibilities Empowerment of SMCs and PTAs to demand transparency and accountability from education and school authorities; Initiate tracking flows and utilization by SMCs and PTAs in primary schools 27

28 THANK YOU THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION 28


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