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Chapter Four Federalism. Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4-2 The basic premise of federalism is that a. supreme executive power.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter Four Federalism. Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4-2 The basic premise of federalism is that a. supreme executive power."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter Four Federalism

2 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4-2 The basic premise of federalism is that a. supreme executive power derives from a mandate from the masses. b. two or more governments share power and authority over the same land and people. c. supreme political authority remains with the states. d. a national government has ultimate sovereignty over a country’s land and people. e. state and local governments may not exercise powers of their own that are independent of the national government.

3 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4-3 The basic premise of federalism is that a. supreme executive power derives from a mandate from the masses. b. two or more governments share power and authority over the same land and people. (correct) c. supreme political authority remains with the states. d. a national government has ultimate sovereignty over a country’s land and people. e. state and local governments may not exercise powers of their own that are independent of the national government.

4 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4-4 The concept of citizenship held by the framers of the U.S. Constitution was that Americans were citizens of a. the United States. b. individual states at large. c. the state in which they were residents. d. the United States, their home state, and their home community. e. both the United States and their home state.

5 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4-5 The concept of citizenship held by the framers of the U.S. Constitution was that Americans were citizens of a. the United States. b. individual states at large. c. the state in which they were residents. d. the United States, their home state, and their home community. e. both the United States and their home state. (correct)

6 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4-6 The Constitution did not give Congress the authority to establish the Internal Revenue Service. Congress did so, however, to implement its power to “lay and collect taxes.” This is an example of the use of a(n) _____ power. a. implied b. delegated c. reserved d. expressed e. inherent

7 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4-7 The Constitution did not give Congress the authority to establish the Internal Revenue Service. Congress did so, however, to implement its power to “lay and collect taxes.” This is an example of the use of a(n) _____ power. a. implied (correct) b. delegated c. reserved d. expressed e. inherent

8 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4-8 Which of the following was the major principle decided by McCulloch v. Maryland? a. Judicial review b. National supremacy c. The elastic clause d. Equal protection e. State sovereignty

9 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4-9 Which of the following was the major principle decided by McCulloch v. Maryland? a. Judicial review b. National supremacy (correct) c. The elastic clause d. Equal protection e. State sovereignty

10 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Local governments a. tend to have little or no legislative power. b. exercise a large measure of home rule. c. are generally more powerful and have more independence than do municipal governments. d. are administered by municipal governments. e. are legal entities of county governments.

11 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Local governments a. tend to have little or no legislative power. (correct) b. exercise a large measure of home rule. c. are generally more powerful and have more independence than do municipal governments. d. are administered by municipal governments. e. are legal entities of county governments.


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