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HOW PARENTS CAN HELP THEIR CHILDRENHOW PARENTS CAN HELP THEIR CHILDREN Liz RoperLiz Roper Family & Community EngagementFamily & Community Engagement Office.

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Presentation on theme: "HOW PARENTS CAN HELP THEIR CHILDRENHOW PARENTS CAN HELP THEIR CHILDREN Liz RoperLiz Roper Family & Community EngagementFamily & Community Engagement Office."— Presentation transcript:

1 HOW PARENTS CAN HELP THEIR CHILDRENHOW PARENTS CAN HELP THEIR CHILDREN Liz RoperLiz Roper Family & Community EngagementFamily & Community Engagement Office of Federal ProgramsOffice of Federal Programs

2 Students Achieve More When Families Are Engaged Studies Show Students Will: Attend school regularly Have better social skills and lower rates of suspension Fewer instances of violent behavior Earn higher grades and test scores Have fewer placement in special education and enroll in higher-level programs Have increased motivation and better self-esteem Earn credits, graduate and have increased postsecondary education enrollment (www.sedl.org/pubs/catalog/items/fam33.html )www.sedl.org/pubs/catalog/items/fam33.html Decreased use of drugs and alcohol

3 Help Your Child Succeed  Encourage healthy & supportive lifestyle: nutritious food, study and leisure time, limit TV, and establish a sleep schedule: Preschool children need hours Children and teens need 9-11 hours Adults need 7-8 hours  Explain the importance of school: getting a good education is a priority Have high expectations and set academic goals Insist on daily attendance & follow school rules  Provide academic support: place to study, homework resources, and school supplies Make homework your child’s responsibility- help break large tasks into smaller ones Use rewards and consequences

4 Help Your Child Build Skills Social skills- please, thank you, introductions, handshake, eye contact, phone etiquette, speaking up for what he/she needs, problem solving, anger, stress, arguments, fear Organization skills-use folders, agenda, calendar Reading skills- read to your child and have your child read to you, model reading, increase vocabulary, comprehension and reading rate Technology-word processing, blogs, chat rooms, cyber bullying, instant messaging, MySpace, Facebook Let your child know how proud you are of him/her, compliment on accomplishments/strengths, provide specific feedback on weaknesses, always encourage

5 School Information: How’s My Child Doing? Attend school programs Obtain information from the school website Attend parent-teacher conferences-prepare questions/concerns, share information, get feedback Review mid progress reports and report cards Be an advocate for your child. Ask your child: questions about his/her school day, getting along with peers, what did he/she learned today, understanding his subjects- & follow up with the teachers. On days homework hasn’t been assigned, create some

6 Different Grades, Different Needs Elementary school- “Warm fuzzies” Children need much structure and step by step nurturing directions. Middle school- focus shifts from families to friends, will I fit in, don’t embarrass me; new challenges- lockers, books, changing classes, more homework, more responsibilities Be sure your children are making good choices and that they are doing well in school. More than ever they need your guidance. High school- exploring everything, strong social life, transitioning to independence

7 Prepare Our Children for Work Understand the School Assessments These assessments will determine if your child is on track to meet TN’s college and career-ready graduation requirements. 8th graders take the EXPLORE test to assess ACT readiness or PSAT for SAT prediction 10th graders take the PLAN test to assess ACT readiness or PSAT for SAT prediction 11th grade students take the ACT or SAT (college entrance exam) In high school, end-of-course tests will be administered for 10 core subjects: English I, II and III; Algebra I and II, Geometry, or equivalent; U.S. History, Biology I, Chemistry, and Physics. These exams will count as a percentage of the student's final course grade.

8 Prepare Our Children for Work Our Job Market Has Changed Tennessee students are competing for jobs not just against students in the United States, but also against students in India and China. Global access to technology has caused profound changes in business, economics and jobs. These changes are transforming the U.S. job market. The U.S. no longer holds a corner on the market for highly qualified workers. Today’s workers require more education than ever before. Between 1995 and 2005, the U.S. lost 3 million manufacturing jobs and 17 million service jobs were created.

9 Jobs In Require More Education Jobs requiring post-secondary education or training will make up more than two-thirds of new jobs. 36% of jobs will require some post secondary training 31% of jobs will require a bachelors degree 22% of jobs will require a high school diploma 10% of jobs will be held by high school dropouts. Source: Carnevale, Anthony P. and Donna M. Desrochers, Standards for What? The Economic Roots of K–16 Reform, Educational Testing Service, FACT: 81% of Tennessee’s jobs are middle- or high-skill (jobs that require some postsecondary education or training). FACT: Yet only 30% of Tennessee adults have some postsecondary degree (associate’s or higher). Source: Tennessee Diploma Project

10 Prepare Our Children for Work Explore what kind of life the child wants, discuss job options, and set career goals Determine which high school classes will prepare for post secondary training Assist the child in getting college and vocational school information Tour campuses Explore finance options for paying for school- Pell grants, student loans, work-study programs Create a plan to pay for college. In 2009 annual cost: Public four year college in state $18,888-$20,000 Private four year college $37,000-$40,000 Community college $11,000-$15,000 Complete admission and financial aid packets

11 Resources Tennessee Diploma Project “Taking Inventory: Job Skills in the Tennessee Workforce” High School Transition Policy- Frequently Asked Questions TN State Report Card Tennessee Curriculum Standards K-12 Financial aid ACT College information Planning for college

12 Liz Roper Family and Community Engagement Office of Federal Programs Tennessee Department of Education

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