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© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Unit 13: Basic Mise.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Unit 13: Basic Mise."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Unit 13: Basic Mise en Place This subject applies to many aspects of the foodservice industry

2 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.

3 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. What Is Mise en Place? The term well begun is half done never held truer than in our industry If you are properly set up, clean, organized with everything you need, are well informed of your task, the job is pleasurable, rewarding, and efficient, with a great degree of quality

4 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Starting Each shift has a mise en place sheet or written plan This plan is constantly updated and improved Equipment, hand tools, bleach pot, specific station, food, condiments, recipes, and anything else to make the job be accomplished thoroughly, profitably, efficiently, and with a quality the guests are willing to pay for It will make all the personnel feel that they are part of the whole team of an operation

5 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Bouquet Garni and Sachet d Épices A bouquet is a bundle of fresh herbs, tied together; a sachet is a small sack of dry herbs tied into cheesecloth, like a tea bag Both used to infuse a flavor into a liquid or dish and are then removed A leek is used to hold the herb combination and string used to tie The sachet will have peppercorns and other dried flavorings and/or herbs and aromatics

6 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Bouquet Garni and Sachet d Épices (continued) For a small batch of stock, the aromatics are simmered 15–20 minutes Larger batches simmer for 1 hour or more Standard bouquet is 1 sprig of thyme, 3–4 parsley stems, 1 bay leaf, 2–3 leak leaves, 1 stalk of celery Sachet, add ½ tsp of peppercorns, cracked

7 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Mirepoix Vegetables or aromatics that provide a background flavor French term for a combination of onions, celery, and carrots The ratio is 2 parts to 1 part to 1 part or 2:1:1 1 pound for 1 gallon of a liquid Rough cut or chopped or large dice Simmered 1 hour Small dice for stocks or liquids simmering for less than 1 hour

8 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Mirepoix (continued) Types of mirepoix –White mirepoix –Matignon –Standard mirepoix –Cajun trinity –Battuto All have the same purpose: to enhance the background flavor

9 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Application of Mirepoix Can be added as it is to simmering liquid Various size dices for longer or shorter periods Can be sautéed Can be sweated Puréed right into the liquid Sometimes strained out Caramelized or browned, known as pinçage

10 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Clarified Butter Very necessary ingredient, used in many operations Made by heating whole butter slowly over direct heat or a double boiler Heat separates milk solids, which are usually discarded, and the oil used for roux, sauté Higher smoke point is achieved Known as ghee in Asian cuisines Best done with unsalted butter

11 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.

12 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Roux Flour-based thickener for sauces, stews, braises Very stable Three types are white, blond, and brown Equal amounts of fat and flour by weight 12 ounces will thicken 1 gallon of liquid to a light consistency The darker the roux, the less the thickening power of the flower Large amounts made in a roast pan or braisier

13 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Roux (continued) Incorporated by adding hot roux to warm liquid, or Hot liquid to room-temperature roux This prevents spattering Must be simmered to eliminate raw flour taste

14 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Slurry Made from pure starch and a liquid Starch must be wet in cool liquid before application Liquid must be cold as starch is not soluble in hot liquid Liquid is best if it is flavored wine, stock, juice, dairy, etc. Water will detract from flavor base

15 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Slurry (continued) Limited holding periods Heat and acid break down slurries Great for translucent sauces or jus lié 4 tbsp of cornstarch will thicken 1 quart of liquid to a medium consistency Add wet starch to a simmering liquid, stirring Bring to one boil, season, and use immediately Types of starch are corn, arrowroot, rice, potato, and tapioca

16 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Buerre Manié French for kneaded butter Equal amounts of soft butter and flour, kneaded together to a smooth paste Sometimes referred to as uncooked roux Store in a cool place Break off small pieces to correct sauces or to make slight viscosity in a liquid

17 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Liaison A mixture of egg yolks and cream Adds body and sheen to a dish Must be tempered before application Will scramble with product temperatures over 185°F (85°C) Basic ratio is 3 parts cream to 1 part egg yolk, 3:1

18 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.

19 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Plumping Dried Fruits Rehydration First, check for blemishes, debris, and moldy specimens Place fruit into a large, clean bowl Pour hot liquid over the fruit and let steep Pour off liquid and reserve if desired

20 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Toasting Nuts, Seeds and Spices Cast-iron or thick-bottomed pan or skillet Medium heat Dry pan only, no oil etc. Add items to toast Stir frequently or they will scorch Larger quantities may be baked in a moderate oven

21 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Chiles Chiles that are dried may be toasted the same way as nuts and seeds They may be rehydrated or plumped the same as dried fruit Save the liquid as it is a wonderful flavor

22 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Oignon Piqué or Brûlé A piqué is made by fastening a bay leaf to the onion with a whole clove One application would be to add it to milk or cream being heated for a béchamel, then strained out A brûlé is a split onion, charred on the larger surfaces and added to a stock or consommé for color and flavor


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