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Student Learning Targets as a Measure of Teacher Effectiveness Prepared for South Dakota Education Professionals July 30 – August 2, 2013 Delivered by:

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Presentation on theme: "Student Learning Targets as a Measure of Teacher Effectiveness Prepared for South Dakota Education Professionals July 30 – August 2, 2013 Delivered by:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Student Learning Targets as a Measure of Teacher Effectiveness Prepared for South Dakota Education Professionals July 30 – August 2, 2013 Delivered by: Marie McMillen Eddie Campbell Brenda McGown

2 What do you see as the benefits and challenges of student learning targets? BENEFITS CHALLENGES

3 Training Targets  I understand the student learning target creation process and its impact on student learning.  I can write, implement, and monitor a learning target written in SMART goal format that is appropriate for measuring long-term student growth.  I can help others work through the design and use of student learning targets.

4 Measures of Professional Practice (South Dakota Framework) Quantitative Measures of Student Growth (Learning Targets Assessment Data) South Dakota Teacher Effectiveness System All measures are supported by evidence and artifacts. Multiple Measures of Teacher Effectiveness

5 Why Use Student Learning Targets? Focus on student results Explicitly connect teaching and learning Improve instructional practice and teacher effectiveness Tool for school improvement

6 Using SLTs to Measure Student Growth Step 1: Developing Student Learning Targets The process begins with attaching structure to student learning expectations. Teachers or groups of teachers are responsible for developing SLTs but the principal’s guidance throughout the process is valuable. Four Questions to Consider 1. What do I most want my students to know and be able to do? Identify the core concepts and standards 2. Where are my students starting? Gather then analyze data to determine how well prepared students are to learn core concepts and standards 3.What assessments are available? Select or Develop an assessment Select or develop an appropriate assessment to measure student learning and growth 4.What can I expect my students to achieve? Leads to development of student growth targets with a strong rationale supporting why the targets are appropriate

7 Using SLTs to Measure Student Growth Step 2: SLT Approval by the Evaluator Once developed, the SLT must be approved as the official measure of student growth for the evaluation period. This should be done early in the school year. Submitting the SLT to the evaluator prior to any face-to-face meeting will provide him/her time to review the goal and offer any feedback needed to strengthen the goal.

8 Initial Collaborative Learning Target Conference Assessment  How will progress be measured? What assessments are already in place and how were they developed? If applicable, how will the assessments be developed? Are the data sources/measures of student learning, growth, achievement, &/or proficiency/mastery appropriate for goal?  Are the identified assessments aligned to state, local, or national association standards? Goals  Do the Student Learning Targets/Student Growth Goals respond to student needs reflected by the data?  Are the Student Learning Targets/Student Growth Goals aligned to content learning targets?  Do the Student Learning Targets/Student Growth Goals meet the criteria set forth on the Checklist? Strategies  Are identified strategies appropriate to positively impact the student goals?  How can the supervisor help support you with achieving these goals?

9 Using SLTs to Measure Student Growth Step 3: Ongoing Communication During the Instructional Period The evaluator and teacher should be in contact throughout the year to determine progress toward the goal(s) and whether any accommodations are necessary. This is especially important during early stages of SLT implementation. Feedback may occur electronically or as part of other evaluation-related meetings, i.e. post-observation conferences.

10 Using SLTs to Measure Student Growth Step 4: Preparing for the Summative Conference Discussion of teacher’s student growth rating takes place during a summative conference at the end of the evaluation period. To prepare for this conference, teachers should assemble, organize and deliver to the evaluator evidence of student growth.

11 Student Growth Process Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Collaborate with administration to create specific learning targets based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goal(s) for target SD Step 1: Developing Student Learning Targets SD Step 2: Administrative Approval SD Step 3: On going communication SD Step 4: Summative Conference

12 Relationship Among Student Growth Process, SD Steps, and SD Framework for Teaching Student Growth ProcessS D StepsDomain(s) from Danielson Framework Content1Domain 1. Planning and Preparation Context1Domain 1. Planning and Preparation Baseline Data1Domain 1. Planning and Preparation Student Learning Target Statement 2Domain 4. Professional Responsibilities Student Growth Instructional Strategies3Domain 1. Planning and Preparation Domain 3. Instruction Monitoring SLT Acquisition3Domain 1. Planning and Preparation Domain 3. Instruction Determining SLT Acquisition 4Domain 4. Professional Responsibilities Student Growth

13 Step 1: Determining Needs Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Collaborate with administration to create specific learning targets/ goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

14 Appropriate Needs Assessment You must get the needs assessment correct to get the goal correct. The needs assessment must generate relevant student data. Selected assessments must produce comparable data at beginning and ending of year/course.

15 Step 2: Creating Student Learning Targets Using the SMART Process Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Collaborate with administration to create specific learning targets based on pre-assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

16 SMART A Format for Developing SLTs S Specific- The goal addresses student needs within the content. The goal is focused on a specific area of need. M Measurable- An appropriate instrument or measure is selected to assess the goal. The goal is measurable and uses an appropriate instrument. A Appropriate- The goal is clearly related to the role and responsibilities of the teacher. The goal is standards-based and directly related to the subject and students that the teacher teaches. R Realistic- The goal is attainable. The goal is doable, but rigorous and stretches the outer bounds of what is attainable. T Time-bound- The goal is contained to a single school year/course. The goal is bound by a timeline that is definitive and allows for determining goal attainment.

17 SMART SLTs for Measuring Student Growth SMART Goal:

18 SMART SLTs for Measuring Student Growth Context: (describe assessment and determination of need) SMART Goal:

19 SMART SLTs for Measuring Student Growth Checklist for Goal Quality Appropriate needs assessment? Specific? Context: SMART Goal:

20 Specific To be specific, the goal should state exactly what content is to be addressed. The content should be tied directly to the standards for this grade and subject.

21 SMART SLTs for Measuring Student Growth Checklist for Goal Quality Appropriate needs assessment? Specific? Measurable? Context: SMART Goal:

22 Measurable Measures are stated by increases in: rate, percentage, number, level of benchmark, level of performance, rubric standards, or juried level of standard.

23 SMART SLT for Measuring Student Growth Checklist for Goal Quality Appropriate needs assessment? Specific? Measurable? Appropriate? Context: SMART Goal:

24 Appropriate To be appropriate, the goal should be directly related to the subject, to the standard(s), and to the students. The goal is within the teacher’s realm of influence in the classroom.

25 SMART SLTs for Measuring Student Growth Checklist for Goal Quality Appropriate needs assessment? Specific? Measurable? Appropriate? Realistic/Rigorous? Context: SMART Goal:

26 Realistic/Rigorous Realistic goals are rigorous and should stretch the outer bounds of what is attainable. Realistic goals are not easy goals.

27 SMART SLTs for Measuring Student Growth Checklist for Goal Quality Appropriate needs assessment? Specific? Measurable? Appropriate? Realistic/Rigorous? Time-bound? Context: SMART Goal:

28 Time-bound The goal has a time frame for accomplishing the measurable target. Ongoing progress monitoring provides data for adjusting the learning experience toward the goal. Data is collected between 2 points in time, as close to beginning and ending of course as possible.

29 SMART SLTs for Measuring Student Growth Checklist for Goal Quality Appropriate needs assessment? Specific? Measurable? Appropriate? Realistic/Rigorous? Time-bound? Includes all students? Context: SMART Goal:

30 Includes All Students The goal addresses growth for all students in the classroom.

31 SMART SLTs for Measuring Student Growth Checklist for Goal Quality Appropriate needs assessment? Specific? Measurable? Appropriate? Realistic/Rigorous? Time-bound? Includes all students? Comparable across classrooms? Context: SMART Goal:

32 Comparable across classrooms The measures ensure that students are being measured with instruments and processes of comparable rigor across similar classrooms. Based on the data, rigor of goals is comparable across similar classrooms.

33 Model the SMART SLT Activity

34 SMART SLT for Student Growth Checklist for Goal Quality Appropriate needs assessment? Specific? Measurable? Appropriate? Realistic/Rigorous? Time-bound? Includes all student? Comparable across classrooms? Context: Elementary Art Baseline data show that less than 1% of my students met the benchmark (80% score) on the art assessment developed by the district. Two students out of the 90 met the benchmark. These two students have been taking art lessons outside of school. SMART Goal: By the end of the current school year, at least 80% of my students will meet or exceed the benchmark for art assessment.

35 By the end of the current school year, at least 80% of my students will meet or exceed the benchmark for art assessment. Specific? Measurable Appropriate? Realistic? Time-bound? Standards based? Rigorous? Appropriate assessment? Data between 2 points in time? Comparable across classrooms? Includes all students?

36 How SMART is this SLT? By the end of the current school year, at least 80% of my students will meet or exceed the benchmark for art assessment. Specific? yes Measurable? yes, based on pre and post assessments Appropriate? it is in the teacher’s realm of control Realistic? Time-bound? by end of school year Standards based? assume the dist. assessment is standards based Rigorous? Yes, if 80% stretches the outer bounds of attainable Appropriate assessment? if the district assessment is based on state or national standards Data between 2 points in time? not stated, but probably understood that baseline was set in beginning of year Comparable across classrooms? district assessment ensures comparable assessment, but not sure if goal is comparable across classrooms. Includes all students? all students are included in the assessment, but the two students already at benchmark are not addressed and there is no growth expectation for the other 20%.

37 Original SMART SLT: By the end of the current school year, at least 80% of my students will meet or exceed the benchmark for art assessment. Revised SMART SLT: By the end of the current school year, all of my students will show growth and at least 80% of my students will meet or exceed the benchmark for art on the district developed assessment.

38 Directions for activity Stand up, walk at least 10 steps to find a person you have not talked with today. Be sure to take the SMART Goal handout with you. Together, answer the check list questions. Rewrite the provided Student Learning Target if can be improved. Share out. Repeat until all goals have been reviewed.

39 SMART SLT for Measuring Student Growth Checklist for Goal Quality Appropriate needs assessment? Specific? Measurable? Appropriate? Realistic/Rigorous? Time-bound? Includes all student? Comparable across classrooms? Context: 4 th Grade Reading STAR data reveals that 58% of students are reading on or above grade level. SMART Goal: For the current school year, all of my students will be reading on or above grade level by the end of the school year as measured by the STAR assessment.

40 For the current school year, all of my students will be reading on or above grade level by the end of the school year as measured by the STAR assessment. Specific? Measurable? Appropriate? Realistic? Time-bound? Standards based? Rigorous? Appropriate assessment? Data between 2 points in time? Comparable across classrooms? Includes all students?

41 How SMART is this SLT? For the current school year, all of my students will be reading on or above grade level by the end of the school year as measured by the STAR assessment. Specific? yes Measurable? yes, based on pre and post assessments Appropriate? it is in the teacher’s realm of control Realistic? Highly unlikely, but dependent on the pre-assessment data of the other 42% of students Time-bound? by end of school year Standards based? STAR is standards based Rigorous? add a stretch goal for the 58% who are already at grade level Appropriate assessment? yes Data between 2 points in time? yes, beginning and ending STAR assessments are referenced Comparable across classrooms? district assessment Includes all students? all students are measured, but there is no growth expectation for the 58% already at grade level

42 Original SMART SLT: For the current school year, all of my students will be reading on or above grade level by the end of the school year as measured by the STAR assessment. Revised SMART SLT: For the current school year, all 90% of my students will be reading on or above grade level by the end of the school year as measured by the STAR assessment, and all students will show at least one year’s growth.

43 SMART SLT for Measuring Student Growth Checklist for Goal Quality Appropriate needs assessment? Specific? Measurable? Appropriate? Realistic/Rigorous? Time-bound? Includes all student? Comparable across classrooms? Context: High School Science As a pretest, biology students evaluated an experiment and I scored their performance using a 4-level scientific rubric in which a core of 3 signifies proficiency. Question/Hypothesis – 2 Investigation Design – 1.5 Methods of Data Collection – 1.5 Data Analysis – 1.5 SMART Goal: During the school year, all of my students will make measurable progress in each of the 4 areas related to scientific investigation. The students will perform at the 3 level in all 4 areas on a post performance assessment.

44 During the school year, all of my students will make measurable progress in each of the 4 areas related to scientific investigation. The students will perform at the 3 level in all 4 areas on a post performance assessment. Specific? Measurable? Appropriate? Realistic? Time-bound? Standards based? Rigorous? Appropriate assessment? Data between 2 points in time? Comparable across classrooms? Includes all students?

45 How SMART is this SLT? During the school year, all of my students will make measurable progress in each of the 4 areas related to scientific investigation. The students will perform at the 3 level in all 4 areas on a post performance assessment. Specific? yes Measurable? yes, based on pre and post assessments Appropriate? it is in the teacher’s realm of control Realistic? yes Time-bound? by end of school year Standards based? Is this standards content? Rigorous? What about students already at the 3 level? Are all of the benchmark and goal scores averages? What about all indiv. student growth? Appropriate assessment? Not sure if this is a district rubric. It should be or at least aligned beyond the single classroom teacher. Data between 2 points in time? yes Comparable across classrooms? Not mentioned Includes all students? all students are included in assessment, but only as part of the averages for benchmark and goals.

46 Original SMART SLT: During the school year, all of my students will make measurable progress in each of the 4 areas related to scientific investigation. The students will perform at the 3 level in all 4 areas on a post performance assessment. Revised SMART SLT: During the school year, all of my students will make measurable progress in each of the 4 areas related to scientific investigation, as measured on the district scientific investigation rubric. The average performance score for all will be at the 3 level in all 4 areas on the post performance assessment.

47 SMART SLT for Measuring Student Growth Checklist for Goal Quality Appropriate needs assessment? Specific? Measurable? Appropriate? Realistic/Rigorous? Time-bound? Includes all student? Comparable across classrooms? Context: Middle School Special Education The Woodcock-Johnson test was administered in August. The baseline data how that all the students are reading below grade level. The range of grade equivalency is 1.2 to 5.7. SMART Goal: For the current school year, all students will show measurable progress on the Woodcock-Johnson. The students will increase their Woodcock-Johnson score by an average of 1.5 years.

48 For the current school year, all students will show measurable progress on the Woodcock-Johnson. The students will increase their Woodcock-Johnson score by an average of 1.5 years. Specific? Measurable? Appropriate? Realistic? Time-bound? Standards based? Rigorous? Appropriate assessment? Data between 2 points in time? Comparable across classrooms? Includes all students?

49 How SMART is this SLT? ( For the current school year, all students will show measurable progress on the Woodcock-Johnson. The students will increase their Woodcock-Johnson score by an average of 1.5 years.) Specific? yes Measurable? yes, based on pre and post assessments Appropriate? it is in the teacher’s realm of control Realistic? yes Time-bound? yes Standards based? nationally validated? Rigorous? Is 1.5 average growth rigorous? Should measurable progress be specified for all students? Appropriate assessment? ? Data between 2 points in time? yes Comparable across classrooms? yes, it is standardized nationally Includes all students? all students are included

50 Original SMART SLT: For the current school year, all students will show measurable progress on the Woodcock-Johnson. The students will increase their Woodcock-Johnson score by an average of 1.5 years. Revised SMART SLT: For the current school year, all students will show measurable progress on the Woodcock-Johnson. will increase their score by ___ years and the average The students will increase of their Woodcock-Johnson score by an average of will be 1.5 years.

51 Anna Tate 8 th Grade Language Arts Teacher Pre-Assessment of Student Ability in Writing

52 First, Anna must select or develop an appropriate needs assessment. She decided to have each student do a free write on any subject (s)he selected. These were scored using the District created writing rubric.

53 Rubric used for Assessing Students 1234 Audience & Purpose The writer may identify a general topic but demonstrates little or no awareness of purpose or audience. The writer identifies a generalized purpose or audience but does not maintain focus on both. Instead, the writer focuses more on the task than the actual purpose or intended audience. The writer adequately establishes focus on the intended audience and purpose, but may not consistently maintain this focus, losing sight of audience or purpose on occasion. The writer establishes and maintains focus on audience and purpose and effectively engages the audience by providing relevant background information. Idea Development The writer gives little or no purposeful development of ideas, interpretation, insight or clarification. No examples or details are provided or support is irrelevant. The writer demonstrates inconsistent development of ideas often presenting facts with little insight, interpretation, or clarification. The writer provides minimal or irrelevant examples and/or details for support. The writer develops ideas with adequate support, and clarification of the topic through examples, details, facts, explanations, descriptions, or arguments. The writer consistently develops ideas with depth and complexity to provide insight, support, and clarification of the topic. The writer consistently develops ideas using appropriate and effective examples, details, facts, explanations, descriptions or arguments. Organization & Structure The writer offers little or no organizational structure, placing ideas in no logical order. There is little or no variety in sentence structures. The writer demonstrates some attempt at organization, but often places ideas in an unclear order that disrupts the natural flow or cohesion. The writer occasionally uses varied sentence structures, these appear alongside mostly simple sentences. The writer adequately organizes the writing by using a logical progression of ideas that generally flows from idea to ideas, though connections between some ideas are less clear on occasion. The writer consistently organizes the writing by using a logical progression of ideas that flows within and between paragraphs. The writer consistently uses a variety of sentence lengths and structures.

54 StudentAudience & Purpose Idea Development Organization & Structure Average Student Student Student Student Student Student Student Student Student Student Student Student Student Student Student Student Student 17 (no response) Student Student Student Average

55 Student Performance by Groups Low Performing Students Mid Performing Students High Performing Students Audience & Purpose Idea Development Organization & Structure

56 Baseline Data

57 Anna’s Student Learning Target Student Learning Target Statement: For the 2012 – 13 school year students will make measurable progress in writing- 80% of the students will score a “3” or better overall. A good student learning target is one that is… Specific Measurable Appropriate Realistic Time-bound

58 Anna’s SLT Student Learning Statement: For the 2012 – 13 school year, 100% of students will make measurable progress in writing. Each student will improve by one performance level in two or more areas of the rubric (audience/purpose, idea development, organization & structure). Furthermore, 80% of the students will score a “3” or better overall. A good student learning target is one that is… Specific Measurable Appropriate Realistic Time-bound

59 You need to KNOW your students before you can judge the appropriateness of the student learning target.

60 Step 2: Creating SLTs Using the SMART Process Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Collaborate with administration to create specific learning targets based on pre-assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

61 Step 3: Creating and Implementing Strategies Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Collaborate with administration to create specific learning goals based on pre-assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

62 Relationship between Student Learning Targets and the Professional’s Learning Needs

63 Students will use a writer’s notebook for writing practice, specifically developing ideas and focusing on specific audiences for specific purposes. Students will analyze organizational structure of narrative, informational/explanatory, and argumentative writing and apply to their own writing. Students will participate in peer response groups to give/receive feedback on audience awareness, purpose, and idea development. Student Growth vs. Professional Growth Strategies I will implement strategies learned during the Writer’s Workshop training and develop writing prompts for students to use in their writer’s notebooks. I will refine my implementation of the standards, researching and implementing engaging and rigorous teaching strategies that deepen student understanding of organizational structures and uses in their own writing. I will refine my use of ongoing formative assessment to impact daily instruction by teaching students to lead classroom discussions and peer reviews. I will incorporate these in practice.

64 Step 4: Monitoring Student Progress and Making Adjustments Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Collaborate with administration to create specific learning targets based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

65 Monitoring Student Progress Monitor both student progress toward goal attainment AND strategy effectiveness through formative assessment processes. Make adjustments to strategies as needed. Meet with evaluator for a mid-year review

66 So, what data sources will you use?

67 Data Source Possibilities Interim Assessments Classroom Assessments Projects Products Student Portfolios Student Performances Common Assessments District Assessments

68 Data Source Possibilities Interim Assessments Classroom Assessments Projects Products Student Portfolios Student Performances Common Assessments District Assessments Aligned to Standards Descriptive Rubrics

69 Anna Tate 8 th Grade Language Arts Teacher Goal Statement: For the 2012 – 13 school year, 100% of my students will make measurable progress in writing. Each student will improve by one performance level in at least 2 areas; audience & purpose, idea development, and organization & structure. Furthermore, 80% of the students will score a “3” or better overall. Baseline and Mid-Year Data 25%50%

70 Anna’s Mid-year Reflection on Strategies Goal StrategyAdjustments to Strategies Implement writer’s notebook for student writing practice. I will incorporate opportunities for peer response groups to write collaboratively using writer’s notebook activities, assessing specifically for idea development using rubric criteria. I will focus my modeled writing lessons around how writers create and build on topic ideas. Implement peer response groups. I will model decision-making about suggested revisions as students provide feedback on my writing samples. I will provide students more intentional practice making revisions to their writing and allow them to share those revisions in peer response groups. Analyze modes of writing. I will model thinking aloud, and ask students to do the same, to think through characteristics expected for narrative, informational/explanatory, and argumentative writing. Incorporate digital writing opportunities. I will incorporate opportunities to students to write for specific audiences and purposes using digital technologies. Students will collaborate to write, share ideas and will provide and receive feedback using digital tools.

71 Step 5: Determining Goal Attainment Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Collaborate with administration to create specific learning goals based on pre-assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

72 Anna Tate 8 th Grade Language Arts Teacher Baseline, Mid-Year, End of Year Data 50% 80% 25% Goal Statement: For the 2012 – 13 school year, 100% of my students will make measurable progress in writing. Each student will improve by one performance level in at least 2 areas: audience & purpose, idea development, and organization & structure. Furthermore, 80% of the students will score a “3” or better overall.

73 Anna Tate 8 th Grade Language Arts Teacher Baseline, Mid-Year, End of Year Data 50% 78% 25% Goal Statement: For the 2012 – 13 school year, 100% of my students will make measurable progress in writing. Each student will improve by one performance level in at least 2 areas: audience & purpose, idea development, and organization & structure. Furthermore, 80% of the students will score a “3” or better overall.

74 StudentAudience & Purpose Idea Development Organization & Structure Average Student 12/3 1/3 3 Student 23/4 4/4 4 Student 31/2 1/ Student 42/31/3 3 Student 53/32/32/ Student 63/32/3 3 Student 72/41/ Student 81/21/31/ Student 93/3 3/ Student 102/3 1/ Student 113/42/42/ Student 123/3 3 Student 131/2 2 Student 143/33/44/ Student 153/32/3 3 Student 162/3 3 Student 17 (no response) 0/2 2 Student 183/3 2/3 3 Student 193/33/44/ Student 202/31/41/ Average 2.25/ /3.11.9/3.15

75 End of the Year Reflection What worked (i.e., strategies, support, resources, goal(s), assessment)? What did not work? Why? What would you do differently? Why? How did the Student Learning Goal setting process impact your professional practice, professional responsibilities, and/or student learning? How do these results impact professional growth or directed improvement plan targets? What additional training or learning is needed?

76 Summative Reflection on goal(s) status and next steps Based on the results of your original identified measures of goal attainment, to what extent did you achieve your goal(s)? How will I use these results to support my professional growth?

77 One thing I want to know more about is _______________ I teach ________ at __________ grade level NAME________________

78 Questions? Thoughts?

79 How SMART is this SLT? P.E. Teacher’s SLT For the school year: Curl ups: Level 1 students will increase their baseline by 9; Level 2 students by 7; Level 3 students by 4 Mile Run: Level 1 students will decrease their baseline by 4 min.; Level 2 students by 2 min.; Level 3 by 1 min. Reach and stretch: Level 1 students will increase their baseline by 7 cm.; Level 2 by 5 cm.; Level 3 by 2 cm. As measured by the Presidential Fitness Test

80 How SMART is this SLT? Science Teacher’s SLT For the current school year, all of my students will make measurable progress in each of the four areas related to scientific investigation (hypothesis, investigative design, data collection, data analysis). All students will achieve at the 3 level of performance on a 4-point rubric in each area.

81 How SMART is this SLT? Art Teacher’s SLT All students will demonstrate measurable progress in each of the rubric areas (Elements & Principles, Creativity & Originality, Craftsmanship/Skill). At least 50% of students will score 3 on the 5-point rubric.

82 Let’s Practice On your own,  Decide if the goal provided is SMART.  Refer to the SMART Criteria. Next,  Share your thinking and rationale.  Others at your table may have the same goal.  If it is not SMART, discuss possible adjustments to meet SMART criteria.

83 Using Baseline Data The next two activities ask that you write SLTs based on the provided data. After the first data set is presented, move to a different part of the room and find a partner you have not yet worked with. Together you will write a SMART Student Learning Target that addresses the base line data. Once you have completed your SLT, share your work with another duo. Make suggestions to strengthen the work. You may be asked to share your work with the rest of the group.

84 8 th Grade Math Teacher Percentile Rank Distribution of Students on the STAR* Mathematics Assessment Students performing at the 50 th percentile are said to be on grade level. *Acronym Stands for the Standardized Test for Assessment of Reading (STAR)

85 Base Line Data Continued After the data is presented, please stand up if you were born in Jan., Feb., March, April, May or June. Select a partner from the folks seated. Together you will write a SMART Student Learning Target that addresses the base line data. Once you have completed your SLT, share your work with another duo. Make suggestions to strengthen the work. You may be asked to share your work with the rest of the group.

86 Baseline Data Continued Reflecting on the work of his past students, Mr. Wright realized that his pre law students often had difficulty presenting information and developing persuasive arguments as they wrote legal briefs. To verify this concern, he decided to give a pre test, providing them with the details of an incident and then requiring them to prepare a legal brief. Number and Percent of Students Earning Each Score Point on the Essays Unscora ble Expository 3 (5%)7 (12%)12 (21%)19 (33%)8 (14%)5 (9%)3 (5%) Persuasive 2 (4%)9 (16%)14 (25%)23 (40%)5 (9%)4 (7%)2 (4%)

87 Gallery Walk Facilitators will group you into triads based on the exit slip information. Each triad will pick a content area, then develop an overarching appropriate SLT. Write the SLT on the provided chart paper and then post along the wall. During the gallery walk, you will provide feedback using post it notes. Collect the chart paper and review feedback.

88 1. What do I most want my students to know and be able to do? Identify the core concepts and standards 2. Where are my students starting? Gather then analyze data to determine how well prepared students are to learn core concepts and standards 3.What assessments are available? Select or Develop an assessment Select or develop an appropriate assessment to measure student learning and growth 4.What can I expect my students to achieve? Leads to development of student growth targets with a strong rationale supporting why targets are appropriate

89 Based on what you have learned, what do you see as the benefits and challenges of student achievement goal setting? BENEFITSCHALLENGES

90 Common Challenges 1.Data access & analysis – Robustness of data system – Teacher & administrator skills 2.Sufficient & appropriate assessments 3.Writing SMART Student Learning Targets 4.Clarifying the acceptable amount of progress 5.Developing instructionally-based strategies – See Marzano et al., Schmoker, Collins, Blankstein, Fullan, etc., etc….

91 What does research say about setting student learning targets? Linked to mastery learning 1 standard deviation higher on average compared with conventional instruction (Bloom, 1984) Includes formative assessments, frequent corrective feedback Linked to enhancing pre-requisite cognitive skills.7 standard deviation higher on average compared with conventional instruction (Walberg, 1984) Includes initial skills assessment and teaching prerequisite skills that are lacking Linked to assessment for learning Formative assessment in the classroom can result in increases in student learning up to two grade levels (Assessment Reform Group, 2000) Linked to standards-based performance assessment Schools in Loveland, CO, were among highest percentage increase in student performance after implementing standards-based performance assessment (Stronge & Tucker, 2000) Linked to standards-based instruction percentage point gains when teachers set and communicate clear goals for learning (Marzano, Pickering, & Pollock, 2001) Linked to data-based decision-making School districts that show multiple (i.e., 3 or more) years of improvement use data to make decisions and encourage teachers to use student learning data to make instructional decision (Cawelti, 2004; Langer & Colton, 2005; Togneri & Anderson, 2003

92 Setting student achievement goals… Focuses on student results Connects teaching with learning – Improved instruction in the classroom Contributes to school improvement

93 Credits The information shared in this presentation was based on the work of Dr. James Stronge and his peers at William and Mary. Materials developed by the Kentucky Department of Education and the Virginia Department of Education helped inform the presentation.

94 SLTs and Teacher Effectiveness Pilot Review Requirements Recommendations Ready to Go Dr. Janeen Outka, EDEC

95 Are we doing it right? Good news: This is a pilot project. Good news: We have time to fine tune this process before statewide implementation. Good news: You are allowed to make this process flexible for your school. – KEEP MOVING FORWARD!

96 SMART SLTs for Measuring Student Growth Checklist for Goal Quality Appropriate needs assessment? Specific? Measurable? Appropriate? Realistic/Rigorous? Time-bound? Includes all students? Comparable across classrooms?

97 Who is writing SLTs? Teacher Pilot – Pilot Schools: 100 percent of teachers being evaluated in the pilot year (number varies by district) – Scale-up schools: District decision, learning opportunity Principal Pilot – If administrator is a principal of a teacher pilot school, 100 percent of teachers being evaluated – Otherwise, 25 percent of teachers under the principals charge.

98 Options for establishing SLTs Can set uniform SLTs for the whole class Can establishmultiple, differentiated targets based on students’ initial mastery of the content standard Can be individualized to a specific teaching assignment Can be established collaboratively by a PLC Can be structured to conform to school or district goals

99 How many SLTS do I need? In the pilot year, teachers can start with just one SLT – To think about for the future... Elementary teachers Secondary teachers K-12 teachers Teachers with multiple preps

100 What is the timeline for writing, incorporating, and assessing SLTs? School calendar Course length Knowledge of students Scope of SLT Recommendation to wrap up post- assessments by end of April.

101 Assessing SLTs Do I need to use the same pre/post test? – No – Can use multiple measures to gather data Does it have to be a test? – No – Rubrics – Performance assessments – Presentations – Samples of student work

102 Assessing SLTs Common State Assessments Assessments that are pre- approved and mandated for use state-wide OR assessments that are purchased and used across multiple districts. Common District Assessments Assessments that are pre- approved and used in many classrooms in multiple schools in a district. Common School Assessments Assessments that are mandated or optional for use school-wide. Classroom Assessments Assessments used by a single teacher for a particular course.

103 Assessing SLTs Common State Assessments Assessments that are pre- approved and/or mandated for use state-wide OR assessments that are purchased and used across multiple districts. Smarter Balance SDAP NCRC EOC Write to Learn DIBELS AP Exams STARS reading/math MAPS AIMS ACT (SDMyLife practice exams and quizzes) CTE contests/judging Common District Assessments Assessments that are pre- approved and used in many classrooms in multiple schools in a district. DIBELS STARS MAPS AIMS District created/purchased Publisher materials

104 Assessing SLTs Common School Assessments Assessments that are mandated or optional for use school-wide. Exams written by the science teachers and used in all chemistry courses. Publisher materials Classroom Assessments Assessments used by a single teacher for a particular course. Individual teacher created assessments for use in a single course.

105 Support SLT Handbook TBA Coaching – Systems Implementation – SLTs – Assessment – Professional Practices/Danielson Framework


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