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Setting Goals to Respond to Customer Wants and Needs From Data to Action: Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008.

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Presentation on theme: "Setting Goals to Respond to Customer Wants and Needs From Data to Action: Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 Setting Goals to Respond to Customer Wants and Needs From Data to Action: Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008

2 Raynna Bowlby Library Management Consulting Daniel O’Mahony Brown University Library Overview of S.M.A.R.T. goals technique Plan implementations based on using LibQUAL+™ and other survey data Practice developing S.M.A.R.T. goals (with partner) Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008

3 Have you conducted some type of assessment of users? –Have you done LibQUAL+™? –Have you done a local (home grown) user survey? What happened after the assessment? –Have you actively used the assessment data in your library planning & decision making processes? –Have you actively used the assessment data in developing library goals and objectives? Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008 Let’s have a show of hands…

4 Progressing from Analysis to Action From all of the available data, determine what can and should be addressed Prioritize some action items –Align with mission, vision, and goals of parent organization –Address users’ top priorities, by user group –Improve areas of strong user dissatisfaction –Build on strengths, if they are truly user needs and priorities Develop goals for action Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008

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6 S.M.A.R.T. Goals S.M.A.R.T. is a handy acronym for the five characteristics of well-designed goals that focus on specific and measurable targets The concept was derived from the work of Peter Drucker (Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices, 1973) who popularized Management by Objectives (MbO); it is based on his belief that you can’t measure results if you don’t have concrete goals to start with MbO has historically been used with individual performance management, but over the years it has been extended to other uses Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008

7 S.M.A.R.T. Goals “The purpose toward which an endeavor is directed; an objective” S Specific »the desired outcome or result is clearly defined M Measurable »accomplishment can be charted and/or observed A Attainable »achievable, goal is challenging but realistic R Relevant »results-oriented, in line with institutional goals and library vision T Time-bound »deadlines are set for accomplishment Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008

8 S.M.A.R.T. Goals Examples 75% of materials acquired from other libraries are received by users within 7 days of request, by 1/09 50% of new books are on shelf within 5 days after library receipt, by 12/08 80% of Spring’09 courses utilizing the campus CMS include links to library research materials The unit cost of each service desk transaction will decrease by 10% from FY’08 to FY’09 Versus general goals: Improve ILL turn-around time Make new materials accessible to users more quickly Link library to instruction Decrease staffing budget Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008

9 Goals that are Specific… Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008 Indicate a single key result that needs to be achieved; communicate what you would like to see happen Include the observable action, behavior, or achievement; a precise outcome Writing Specific goals: –Use action verbs –Be concrete, straightforward; say exactly what you want to achieve in clear, concise words Why be Specific: –A specific goal has a much greater chance of being accomplished than a general goal; specifics help focus action –When goals are specific, they convey exactly what is expected; when goals are vague, it is difficult to know what you have accomplished and if you have achieved success

10 Goals that are Measurable… Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008 Be able to track progress and assess whether or not you are meeting the objective and to what degree Establish concrete criteria for measuring progress (and put reliable systems in place to take the measures) Writing Measurable goals: –Include a unit of measure; link the specific action, behavior, or achievement to a quantity, rate, percentage, frequency, etc. –Answer questions such as: How much? How many? How will I know when it is accomplished? Why be Measurable: –Measures with milestones that indicate progress help determine that the library is going in the right direction, or they can be indicators that adjustment is needed along the way

11 “We’re not just doing things, we’re aiming for a target.” --Shelley Phipps, August 5, 2008

12 Goals that are Attainable… Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008 Be realistic; make sure your goal is feasible and achievable Focus on actions that are within the library’s control and things the library can actually do (with the resources that are available or can be acquired) Writing Attainable goals: –The best goals require the library to stretch a bit to achieve them, but they are not so extreme as to be out of reach; there is a likelihood of success but that does not mean easy or simple Why be Attainable: –Attainable goals are motivating; goals that are set too high, or too low, become meaningless and are likely to be ignored

13 Goals that are Relevant… Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008 Goals must be significant, important in reaching the library's vision and mission Address the activities and outcomes that are likely to have the greatest impact Writing Relevant goals: –The goals align with the overall organization’s mission and vision and help the organization move forward Why be Relevant: –Relevant goals will make a difference and will help the organization make progress in realizing its vision

14 Goals that are Time-bound… Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008 Each goal must have a starting point, ending point, and fixed duration Indicate when you want to accomplish/complete the objective; determine a deadline Writing Time-bound goals: –Dates for when the activity will be started and completed are defined and clearly stated –Establish realistic timelines and deadlines Why be Time-bound: –Time-bound goals set priorities for time and enable time to be used on objectives that really matter –Time frames create a sense of urgency and prompt action; a lack of deadlines makes the commitment too vague and reduces the urgency required to execute the tasks since they can begin or end at any time

15 S.M.A.R.T. ( E.R. ) Goals Specific & measurable targets for accomplishment of a goal: SSpecific MMeasurable AAttainable, Aligned, Actionable, Action-oriented RRelevant, Realistic, Results-oriented TTime-bound, Timely EExciting, Enjoyable, Ethical RResourced, Recorded Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008

16 By using data from LibQUAL+™ surveys or other user feedback, libraries can develop a targeted set of service goals that are specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and have a time dimension This process can assist the library in identifying key areas where incremental improvements can be achieved, and provide a structured framework for measuring progress toward success Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008 S.M.A.R.T. Goals & User Data

17 Based on worksheet developed by Pi Beta Phi 1 of 2 From Data to Action: Goal Setting Work Sheet

18 EXERCISE #1EXERCISE #1EXERCISE #1EXERCISE #1 Library X The library has analyzed its LibQUAL+ data to identify possible shortcomings. For undergraduates, the Adequacy Gap -- the difference between minimum service level needed and the perceived service level provided by the library -- is smallest for the following elements: (smaller number = less adequate service provided) Library space that inspires study and learning0.11 A library Web site enabling me to locate information on my own0.38 Print and/or electronic journal collections I require for my work0.39 Example of S.M.A.R.T goal: Add task lighting to 75% of study carrels on north side of library by December Directions: With a partner colleague, review the following data collected during a recent administration of LibQUAL+ by a U.S. research library. Using the S.M.A.R.T. goal format, draft 1 or 2 goal statements designed to improve some aspect of library services.

19 Directions: With a partner colleague, review the following data collected during a recent administration of a locally developed user survey by a U.S. research library. Using the S.M.A.R.T. goal format, draft 1 or 2 goal statements designed to improve some aspect of library services. Library Y Respondents were asked to select their top three priorities for enhancement to library services. Items noted as top priority in one service category are listed below; all of these were rated less than satisfactory by users: Library materials shelved in proper order 27.3% Library hours 27.2% Accuracy of catalog to books on the shelf 26.0% EXERCISE #2EXERCISE #2EXERCISE #2EXERCISE #2 Example of S.M.A.R.T goal: Shelf-read the five LC classes with the highest undergraduate circulation by September 2009

20 S.M.A.R.T. Goals “We know one more thing about objectives: how to use them. If objectives are only good intentions they are worthless. They must degenerate into work. And work is always specific, always has -- or should have -- clear, unambiguous, measurable results, a deadline and a specific assignment of accountability.” “One final step remains: to convert objectives into doing. … Unless objectives are converted into action, they are not objectives, they are dreams.” Peter Drucker, Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices, 1973 Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008

21 2 of 2 From Data to Action: Goal Setting Work Sheet

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31 Library Assessment Conference, Seattle, August 6, 2008 Raynna Bowlby Library Management Consulting Daniel O’Mahony Brown University Library


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