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BACSSP Strategic Planning June 28 and 29, 2009. 1 Strategic Planning Participants Howard Backer Gwen Hammer (Sunday only) Jim Rooney Patty Perkins Ed.

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Presentation on theme: "BACSSP Strategic Planning June 28 and 29, 2009. 1 Strategic Planning Participants Howard Backer Gwen Hammer (Sunday only) Jim Rooney Patty Perkins Ed."— Presentation transcript:

1 BACSSP Strategic Planning June 28 and 29, 2009

2 1 Strategic Planning Participants Howard Backer Gwen Hammer (Sunday only) Jim Rooney Patty Perkins Ed Kressy Harold Brooks Rita Chick Emile Durette Peter Ohtaki

3 2 Mission and Vision A Mission statement tells you the fundamental purpose of the organization. It concentrates on the present. It defines the customer and the critical processes. It informs you of the desired level of performance. A Vision statement outlines what the organization wants to be. It concentrates on the future. It is a source of inspiration. It provides clear decision-making criteria.

4 3 Mission (Based on earlier discussions) We are a group of professionals in public health, education, emergency services, information technology, community-based organization, and private business working to develop comprehensive preparedness for pandemic emergency through collaborative planning across sectors and communities in the greater San Francisco Bay Area.

5 4 Revised Mission A sustained representative cross sector group that develops an effective network to build collaboration and interaction among and within sectors to prepare and respond to pandemic and other large scale emergencies within the Greater San Francisco Bay Area

6 5 Purpose To build regional resilience and improve continuity of community in a pandemic emergency by establishing shared concept of operations and plan integration, robust real- time informatics, accurate assets inventory and tracking, tested cross-sector and intra- sector coordination and connectivity, citizen preparedness, and a regional incident command system, as far as possible using existing resources while stimulating the development and allocation of others that may be needed.

7 6 Vision To be – A Network A Creator of Collaboration An Integrator A Convener A Catalyst A neutral, credible, responsible authority to connect key organizations on the issues of pandemic and other large scale emergency planning. To be – A Network A Creator of Collaboration An Integrator A Convener A Catalyst A neutral, credible, responsible authority to connect key organizations on the issues of pandemic and other large scale emergency planning.

8 7 When are successful we are an organization who… Has solved many cross sector gaps in planning for an emergency; Has motivated and provided skills to key organizations to enable them to work together in a sustained fashion; Has created a mechanism that allows organizations to collaborate effectively during an emergency; and Utilizes our collaborative community during an emergency to respond more effectively within our individual organizations Has solved many cross sector gaps in planning for an emergency; Has motivated and provided skills to key organizations to enable them to work together in a sustained fashion; Has created a mechanism that allows organizations to collaborate effectively during an emergency; and Utilizes our collaborative community during an emergency to respond more effectively within our individual organizations

9 8 s SWOT Analysis Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats Helpful Harmful Internal External

10 9 SWOT Analysis - Strengths Each of the members are or know / have access to key decision makers. Membership constitutes some of the key sectors involved in responding to an emergency. Funders such as Gilead. A history of established relationships within the group. All of us have a high level of expertise in either health or disaster response. A shared commitment to / passion for cross-sector – effective emergency response. We are each willing to reach out beyond our own individual sectors (Commitment to the concept of Metta Leadership). Ability to work on a small budget.

11 10 SWOT Analysis – Strengths continued Willingness to work on a voluntary basis (i.e., Steering Committee). A commitment to make the Bay Area the best prepared region for disaster preparedness. Trust among members of the Steering Committee. We are good at not letting turf and getting credit get in the way of collaboration. A willingness to take risks! (courageousness). We each represent organizations that can draw upon many other prospective partners (network). We have a track record of convening successful events. We have a vision for how the various sectors fit within a cross-sector framework.

12 11 SWOT Analysis – Weaknesses We are dependent upon individuals as opposed to organizational structure (BACSPP has not been institutionalized). Limited personnel and budgetary resources. Some of us have limited direct authority over our sectors. Lack of organizational structure for BACSPP -- e.g., work plan, clear objectives and visible deliverables that demonstrate value to our sectors. Lack of external visibility about the role and value of BACSPP. Not all sectors are represented (e.g., schools / education). We lack a tracking or follow-up mechanism (lack of administrative support) to retain sector partners.

13 12 SWOT Analysis – Opportunities The H1N1 outbreak scare caught the publics attention. A general desire for cross-sector outreach (goes back to Hurricane Katrina) among community based organizations and the public and private sectors. More money is now available for disaster planning from the federal government and foundations. Technology: social networking tools/Web 2.0 – better enabling technology for sharing information. Uniqueness of BACSPP relative to other organizations (niche opportunity). Big gaps in both communication and preparedness.

14 13 SWOT Analysis – Opportunities continued There is a need for preparedness – requiring cross-sector collaboration. There are existing response structures and initiatives to leverage / harvest. There exists high level support for disaster preparedness (state and federal). High level of interest within the public for disaster preparedness (given recent events). The fact that disasters are recurring. There are no good models for multi-sector collaboration – presents an opportunity to replicate the BACSPP model on a nationwide scale.

15 14 SWOT Analysis – Threats Inertia of many organizations to do disaster planning. Some funders are or may confuse BACSPP with other organizations doing somewhat similar work which can create a greater competitive situation in the realm of fundraising. Sectors dont naturally collaborate. Various partners / sectors have varied financial, managerial, organizational and accountability structures. Current H1N1 outbreak – uncertainty over the availability of vaccines in the fall. Risk of disaster fatigue among the public / journalists.

16 15 SWOT Analysis – Threats continued Regions are not natural / established jurisdictions – they dont naturally coalesce. Limited ability of organizations and individuals to see beyond their usual scope of work. Limited availability of mutual aid for pandemics unlike other disasters. People are not use to dealing with scarce resources. Everyone is lean right now – limited resources to devote to planning. There are no good models for multi-sector collaboration (also an Opportunity).

17 16 Strategic Framework and Initiatives Strategic Issues: Fundamental Policy Questions and Critical Challenges Questions are framed such that there is a positive answer made possible by the organization Factors that make this a strategic issue Consequences of not taking on the issue Those that should be monitored Impending Immediate

18 17 Strategic Framework and Initiatives Strategic Initiatives Identification of Alternatives Methods Barriers/Obstacles Metrics Actions Workplan

19 18 Strategic Issues – Group One 1. How do we improve cross sector communications? 2. How do we improve visibility for our activities? 3. How do we influence supply chains to mitigate resource shortages? 4. How do we institutionalize cross sector collaboration? 5. How do we answer the question who is in charge? 6. What funding and structure do we need to sustain the partnership long term? 7. How do we get sectors to recognize their inter-dependence? 8. How do we interface with the established response structure? 9. How do we attract and retrain critical group members? 10. How do we prioritize and track our deliverables?

20 19 Strategic Issues – Group Two 1. Is there a need to share experiences with recent H1N1 outbreaks across sectors? (by facilitating sharing and convening) 2. Is there a way of improving cross sector communications during the ongoing pandemic and other emergencies? (maps to 1) (by building a shared website to better communicate) 3. What type of corporate governance is necessary for funding? (maps to 6, 9, 10) (by developing a process to determine fundraising goals for years1, 2,3)

21 20 1/2/ Purpose Steps Feasibility Assessment of how challenging it will be to identify gaps in advance of meeting in September (sample of key organizations) Strategy Convene a cross sector group to share experiences with recent outbreak such that gaps are identified and areas for improvement are defined Alternatives 1. Bring groups together to identify issues/gaps and talk about potential solutions 2. Conference with groups ahead of face to face meeting to identify gaps so that potential solutions can be more fully designed in meeting 3. Set up cross sector conference calls to share information virtually and on a regular basis (This would not culminate in a face to face meeting.) Performance Measures Accountability Timeline September 2009 Investment Strategic Initiative # 1: Learn from recent outbreak Champion: Patty

22 21 1/2/ Purpose Steps Strategy Improve Cross sector Communication during pandemic or other large scale emergency Alternatives 1. Build a protocol for BACSSP to have effective conference calls during an emergency 2. Build a protocol for cross sector conference call for a broader group during an emergency 3. Develop a mechanism to consolidate situation reports from local/state/federal groups and publish via during an emergency 4. Develop online tools (including benchmarking) to assist collaboration during an emergency 5. Develop a shared website to increase information, communication and collaboration. Performance Measures Accountability Timeline Core group – October. Other Sectors - ??? Investment Strategic Initiative # 2: Improve Cross Sector Communication Champion: Peter

23 22 1/2/ Purpose Steps Strategy Design and formalize organizational structure, funding and corporate governance Alternatives 1. Live in ignorance 2. Identify what structure and funding is needed to accomplish current planned initiatives (including prototype grant application 3. Develop a more in depth design for the future state organization (Business Plan) Performance Measures Accountability With help from Emile Timeline Investment Strategic Initiative # 3: Organizational Structure Champions: Harold and Patty

24 23 1/2/ Purpose Steps Strategy This strategy still needs to be developed Goals Performance Measures Accountability Timeline Investment Strategic Initiative # 4: Institutionalizing Cross Sector Communication Leader:

25 24 1/2/ Strategic Initiative: Action Plan Leader: StepsTasksAssigned toDue Date Status

26 25 Strategic Planning Next Steps Socialize with missing members by mid July Gwen Harvey Dennis Sandra Erica Muntu Champions submit work plans for their to group for review by July 15th Revisit other strategic initiatives for which work plans and champions werent identified by October 2009


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