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Planning for Successful Transition from School to Post School Life Presented by Ed P r o o o Development 1.

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Presentation on theme: "Planning for Successful Transition from School to Post School Life Presented by Ed P r o o o Development 1."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Planning for Successful Transition from School to Post School Life Presented by Ed P r o o o Development 1

3 Providing professional development to schools with over 30 years of combined experience. Ed P r o o o Development 2

4 3

5 Upon leaving this transition workshop, participants will: 1.Know the variety of research-based actions that facilitate a students smooth transition from school to post school options. 2.Know how to use the Transition Service Plan Checklist to assist in addressing the variety of actions that facilitate a smooth transition over 4-8 years and to document transition action results. 3.Be familiar with IDEIA 2004 regulations as it relates to transition. 4.Know how implementing research-based best practices for promoting smooth transitions addresses IDEIA requirements. 5.Know how to address transition in student IEPs including use of the TOPS Checklist to assist in meeting transition requirements.

6 5 Name Tag Please ensure that cell phones do not ring Restrooms

7 6 TASL: 14 credit hours + 1 additional credit every 2 hours 9:30-9:45 11:30-12:30 2:15-2:30

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10 9 Transition Requirements Under IDEIA Update on TOPS Project

11 10 Society widely accepts that a key barrier preventing successful outcomes after they leave school is the lack of adequate transition planning. From Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development, Available at:

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13 12 Young people with disabilities drop out of high school at twice the rate of their peers. (Harris Poll, 1998; Presidents Commission on Excellence in Special Education, 2002) Although rates have increased, students with disabilities are still three times less likely to have aspirations that include postsecondary education. Youth in the general population were more than twice as likely as those with disabilities to be attending a postsecondary school in (National Longitudinal Study 2 (Wagner, Cameto, Newman, 2003) Postsecondary Education O utcomes O utcomes

14 13 Only 29% of Americans with disabilities aged 18 to 64 are working, compared to 79% of Americans without disabilities in this age category. (Harris Poll, 1998) The proportion of all adults with disabilities under 65 who are working has remained virtually unchanged at 32% since (Harris Poll #59, Oct. 2000) Outcomes Outcomes Employment

15 14 Employment of Youth with Disabilities – Some Good News! In 2003, 70% of youth with disabilities who had been out of school up to 2 years had worked for pay at some time since leaving high school; 55% had done so in (National Longitudinal Study 2 (Wagner, Cameto, Newman, 2003) Outcomes Outcomes

16 15 Despite substantial policy and system change efforts to improve employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities, disabled Americans still experience higher rates of unemployment, lower average earnings, limited access to employee benefits, disproportionately higher representation in lower-skilled jobs, and higher rates of poverty than their non-disabled peers. (Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development, Available at: jour/05/42/3/jour/05/42/3/graham.html) Outcomes Outcomes Employment

17 16 31% of people with disabilities (compared to 16% of those without disabilities), do not socialize at least once a week with close friends, relatives or neighbors. (Harris Poll 1998) Only one-third of people with disabilities (33%) say they are "very satisfied" with their lives, compared to nearly two-thirds (61%) of people without disabilities. (Harris Poll, 1998) Outcomes Outcomes Quality of Life

18 17 State Performance Plan/Annual Performance Report Report Card Data Indicator 13: Percent of youth aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the student to meet the post-secondary goals. Indicator 14: Percent of youth who had IEPs, who are no longer in secondary school and who have been competitively employed, enrolled in some type of postsecondary school, or both, within one year of leaving high school.

19 18 The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 & Amendments of Its the Law

20 19 Incorporates the language and definition of transition services from the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Requires the state plan to include plans, policies and procedures for cooperating with agencies and schools responsible for students with disabilities receiving special education services to facilitate their transition to employment Requires the development and completion of an Individualized Plan Employment (IPE) before the student leaves the school setting for each VR eligible student The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 & Amendments of 1992 Key Provisions Related to Transition Include:

21 20 The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 & Amendments of 1992 School-To-Work Opportunities Act... Its the Law

22 21 School-To-Work Opportunities Act: Passed May 4, 1994 Key Features Emphasis was on: (a) relevant education, allowing students to explore different careers and see what skills are required in their working environment; (b) skills, obtained from structured training and WORK- BASED LEARNING experiences, including necessary skills of a particular career as demonstrated in a working environment; Provided seed money to states and local partnerships of business, labor, government, education, and community organizations to develop school-to-work systems

23 22 The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 & Amendments of 1992 School-To-Work Opportunities Act Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)... Its the Law

24 23 IDEIA 2004, 602(34)(A) defines transition services: Transition services means a coordinated set of activities for a student, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the childs movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education vocational training integrated employment (including supported employment) continuing and adult education adult services independent living participationcommunity participation

25 24 A Coordinated Set of Activities Instruction Instruction Related services Related services Community experience Community experience Development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives Development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation IDEIA 2004, Section 623(34)B requires that the coordinated set of activities be based on the individual childrens needs, taking into account the childs strengths, preferences, and interests, and shall include:

26 25 Carl D. Perkins Act Tech Act Ticket to Work Work Incentives Improvement Act Workforce Investment Act Americans with Disabilities Act Higher Ed. Access for Students with Disabilities of 1998 Higher Ed. Access for Students with Disabilities of and it is supported by the law

27 26 Transition planning reduces fears and discomfort experienced by parents or guardians Transition planning empowers students and their parents by providing choices, possibly never considered, about their futures! It just makes sense... AND

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29 28 Transition Outcomes Project (TOPS) District-level support for addressing transition requirements outlined in IDEIA. State selected district teams review the outcomes, set compliance goals for each transition requirement, and problem solve how best to improve compliance. Funded by the state department of education, division of special education.

30 29 Using the Transition Requirements Checklist, districts enter a sample of students IEP data into the TOPs web- based data management system. The data is translated into graphic displays representing the districts compliance with each of the IDEIA transition requirements. EXAMPLE: Question 1 - If a purpose of the meeting was the consideration of the postsecondary goals for the child and the transition services needed to assist the child in reaching those goals, did the public agency (school) invite the student? N=781

31 30 For the next activity you will need your seasonal partners sheet and your Transition Requirements Checklist from… SEASONAL PARTNERS INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES EDUCATION IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 2004 TRANSITION REQUIREMENTS and INDICATOR 13 CHECKLIST© Directions Please respond to the following two questions before completing the checklist. If your response is yes to either question, complete the checklist. 1. Will this IEP be in effect when the student turns age 16 or older? ____ yes ____ no 2. Are transition services determined to be appropriate by the IEP team if the student is younger than age 16? ____ yes ____ no

32 31 Move around the room and find four different partners, one for each season of the year. If someone signs your paper for winter, you must do the same for him/her. Once you have four different signatures on your seasonal partners sheet, find your summer partner and stand somewhere in the room With your summer partner, take 2 minutes a piece and discuss what you know about transition planning.

33 32 See Tops Checklist A Transition Requirements Checklist INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES EDUCATION IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 2004 TRANSITION REQUIREMENTS and INDICATOR 13 CHECKLIST © Directions Please respond to the following two questions before completing the checklist. If your response is yes to either question, complete the checklist. 1. Will this IEP be in effect when the student turns age 16 or older? ____ yes ____ no 2. Are transition services determined to be appropriate by the IEP team if the student is younger than age 16? ____ yes ____ no

34 33 Making the Connection Through this presentation we will connect the federal/state regulations to best practice for a smooth and effective transition process.

35 34 KEY COMPONENTS IN TRANSITION The Transition Planning Process is Team-based. Students with Supports From Their Families, Take an Active Role in the Transition Planning Process. The Transition Planning Process is Person- Centered. Transition Planning Results in Individualized Actions focused on Student-Desired Post School Outcomes

36 35 Students Engage in Employment Experiences that Promote Personal Choice & Allow Each Student to Attain Improved Quality of Life KEY COMPONENTS… Participation in Postsecondary Institutions of Higher Education Are Pursued & Expanded Business Plays an Important Role in Transition Planning Students Learn to Apply Authentic, Community- Referenced Skills During Their Educational Years

37 36 KEY COMPONENTS… Each Student Graduates into Paid Community Employment and/or in a Post Secondary Educational Opportunity All Necessary Connections with Adult Services, Funding Agencies, and Other Supports Are Established and Maintained, as Needed.

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39 38 TRANSITION REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST Question 1: If a purpose of the meeting was the consideration of the postsecondary goals for the child and the transition services needed to assist the child in reaching those goals, did the public agency (school) invite the student? Question 2: Did the student attend the IEP meeting? Question 3: If the student did not attend the IEP meeting, did the public agency take other steps to ensure that the student's strengths, preferences and interests were considered?

40 39 ? Student Invitation Did the student receive an invitation to the meeting? Did the student attend the meeting? If the student did not attend, did the school take steps to ensure that the students strengths, preferences and interests were considered? If No, what do you need to do to revise your student invitation? Does your student invitation include the following:

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42 41 _________________ County Schools *Student Invitation to a Meeting* Dear: Date: Our school system would like to invite you to attend a meeting to discuss your transition needs. It will be at ________(location) on ______(date) at ______(time). Your parent(s)/guardian will also be invited to attend this meeting. Members of our staff would like to meet with you for the following reasons: (All that apply are checked.) To review your educational status and determine what data, if any, are needed to complete your evaluation/re-evaluation. To review the results of your initial evaluation/reevaluation and determine eligibility for special education and related services. To review and/or develop your Individualized Education Program (IEP). To consider your educational placement (includes a change in educational placement, graduation and termination of eligibility). To consider a manifestation determination based upon your disability prior to a disciplinary action/hearing.

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44 43 Question 8: Was a parent notice (invitation) provided? Question 9: Does the parent notice (invitation) (invitation) indicate that a purpose of the meeting will be the consideration of the postsecondary goals and transition services of the student? Question 10: Does the parent notice indicate that the public agency will invite the student? Question 11: Does the parent notice (invitation) identify any other agency that will be invited to send a representative? TRANSITION REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST

45 44 ? Parent Invitation Did you send a parent invitation to the IEP meeting? Does the invitation include the purpose of the IEP meeting? Does the invitation include notice of any other agency that was invited? Does the invitation state that the student has been invited? If No, what do you need to do to revise your parent invitation? Does your parent invitation include the following:

46 45 Parent Invitation Please note….. Even once the student turns 18, you DO NOT need the consent of the student to invite the parent to the meeting (Bill Wilson, Division Attorney) You must, however, have consent of the parent and the student to invite an outside agency.

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48 47 Dear: Date: Our school system would like to invite you to attend a meeting to discuss the transition needs of _______(child); your child is also invited to attend this meeting. The meeting will be held at _________(location) on _______(date) at ______(time). Members of our staff would like to meet with you for the following reasons: (All that apply are checked.) To review your childs educational status and determine what data, if any, are needed to complete your childs evaluation/re-evaluation. To review the results of your childs initial evaluation/reevaluation and determine eligibility for special education and related services. To review and/or develop your childs Individualized Education Program (IEP). To consider the educational placement of your child (includes a change in educational placement, graduation and termination of eligibility). To consider a manifestation determination based upon your childs disability prior to a disciplinary action/hearing. To consider the need for a functional behavior assessment of your child. To consider the need to create or revise a behavior intervention plan. _________________ County Schools *Invitation to a Meeting*

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50 49 Transition-Related Educational Service Providers Special education teacher(s) Consulting teacher Itinerant/Consultant teacher General education teacher(s) Vocational education teacher(s) School Counselor GED Teacher(s)

51 50 Work-Based Learning Coordinator Transition Specialist/Coordinator Transition Case Manager Paraprofessional School Social Worker School Psychologist Speech/Physical and/or Occupational Therapist Orientation & Mobility Specialist Nurse IHE Disabilities Support Services Representative Transition-Related Educational Service Providers (cont)

52 51 Agency/ Community Supports Local Adult Service Providers Vocational Rehabilitation Services On the Job Training Supported Employment Services Rehabilitation Engineering Tuition for College Bureau for the Blind Readers for college students Developmental Disabilities Council Supported Living programs Social activities One Stop Career Centers Core, Training, and/or Intensive Services Social Security Administration Plan for Achieving Self Support (PASS) Plans Information on SSI work incentives State Employment Services Work Opportunities Tax Credit State training inventory Dictionary of Occupational Titles Independent Living Center Independent living services or training Family & Neighbors

53 52 Question 4: Will this student need involvement from any outside agency in order to make a successful transition? Question 5: For transition services that are likely to be provided or paid for by other agencies with parent (or child once the age of majority is reached) consent, is there evidence that the representatives of the agency(ies) were invited to IEP meeting? TRANSITION REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST

54 53 1. Target one of the students on your case load. Create a tent with his/her name on it and visual if necessary. 2. Find your fall partner and list five different people who were members of his/her IEP team, and/or who may potentially be team members. Who were they? What relation did each have to the student? Who if anyone could be added as potential team members.

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56 55 What is Person-Centered Planning? Planning Process Assessment Tool Intervention Motivational Activity Team Building Process

57 56 Person-Centered Planning Five Essential Goals 1.Being present and participating in community life 2.Gaining and maintaining satisfying relationships 3.Expressing preferences and making choices in everyday life 4.Having opportunities to fulfill respected roles and live with dignity 5.Continuing to develop personal competencies

58 57 Person-Centered Planning Characteristics Its all about the student and his/her perspective. Empowers the student, family, and team. Uses natural resources to address the short and long term goals/vision. Attends to and builds a network of support for the student, family, - and team! Identifies student strengths, gifts, interests, preferences, and needs.

59 58 Person-Centered Planning Person-Centered Planning Components Personal Profile History of the individual Accomplishments Preferences and desires Action Planning Vision for the future Opportunities & obstacles Strategies for achieving the vision Preliminary action steps

60 59 Person-Centered Planning Processes Person-Centered Planning Processes MAPS Personal Futures Profile PATH

61 60 Making Action Plans (MAPS) What is the Dream? What are the nightmares? Who is this person? Strengths, gifts, talents? What does this person need? What is Plan of Action? What is the story? History? What is a MAP?

62 61 Personal Profile l A team works to develop an understanding of a focus person l Series of frames about the focus person Who is here? Choices People Places Strategies History Hopes & Fears Themes Health Barriers & Opportunities

63 62 Collaborative process Extension of MAPS process. Creates a definitive, concrete action plan, for the student and those closest to the student. Action plan includes long and short term goals and actions and provides a timeline for achieving the goals and actions. Uses group graphic techniques and involves a team of individuals committed to the focus student Takes 3 hours to complete Gives the student REAL choices about his/her future Planning Alternative Tomorrows with Hope PATH

64 63 PATH Eight steps define the Path process and guide the team to clarify the students and teams goals, visualize the results, experience the tension between where they are now and where they want to be, and outline positive actions to move towards the goals and dreams. (Kincaid & Fox, 2002).

65 64 Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined. What is in place now? Who will we need to enrol? What do we need to do to grow stronger? What are your first steps? What do we need to achieve in the next few months? What do we want or need to achieve in 6 months time What are your goals and dreams that you want to achieve in the next 2 – 5 years? 1. Touch the DREAM - get people to explore images of how they want their future to be and ask them to name their 'north star' - their purpose

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67 66 ensure that the student's strengths, preferences and interests were considered? Question 3: If the student did not attend the IEP meeting, did the public agency take other steps to ensure that the student's strengths, preferences and interests were considered? Question 18: Are the transition services designed within a results-oriented process that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the student with a disability to facilitate the students movement from school to post-school activities? TRANSITION REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST

68 67 Student Involvement At your table brainstorm for 3 minutes, on a poster, ways students can participate in the transition process! Share

69 68 Steps Students Can Take 3Lead own IEP meetings! 3With school counselor identify interests and find out what education and training are required. 3Complete interest inventories to identify interests, skills, abilities, and aptitudes as they relate to employment. 3volunteer or do entry-level jobs in field(s) of interest. 3Observe and interview adults who perform the type of work that interests him. 3Visiting training institutes and colleges to learn about entrance requirements

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71 70 Measurable Postsecondary Goals Three Aspects: The understanding and distinction between the terms: education; training; employment; and independent living skills;The understanding and distinction between the terms: education; training; employment; and independent living skills; The term measurable tied to post secondary goals, andThe term measurable tied to post secondary goals, and The distinction between measurable annual goals and measurable post secondary goalsThe distinction between measurable annual goals and measurable post secondary goals (Ed OLeary 2006)

72 71 Measurable Postsecondary Goals Measurability What would one measure?What would one measure? How would one measure whetherHow would one measure whether the student achieved his/her postsecondary goals? the student achieved his/her postsecondary goals? Who will measure the extent with which students achieve postsecondary goals?Who will measure the extent with which students achieve postsecondary goals? When would one measure the extent to which the student achieved his/her postsecondary goal?When would one measure the extent to which the student achieved his/her postsecondary goal?

73 72 Measurable Postsecondary Goals Measurability would one measure? What would one measure? Two perspectives 1.Student - the extent to which the student has demonstrated improvement and achievement of his/her stated postsecondary goals. 2. Education System - the extent to which the education system implemented best practices in preparing all students with IEPs for the next step in life 2. Education System - the extent to which the education system implemented best practices in preparing all students with IEPs for the next step in life.

74 73 Writing Measurable Post Secondary Goals Postsecondary goals should be stated in such a way that we could measure: The extent to which the student has been able to achieve what he/she set out to do, and The extent to which the transition services prepared the student for taking the next step

75 74 How do I write measurable postsecondary goals? Use results-oriented terms such as enrolled in, work, live independently Use descriptors such as full time and part time Begin with After high school…

76 75 Training or Education Specific vocational or career field, independent living skills training, vocational training program, apprenticeship, OJT, job corps, 4 year college or university, technical college, 2 year college, Vocational Technical School (less than a two year program) etc. Employment Paid (competitive, supported, sheltered); unpaid employment (volunteer, in a training capacity); military; etc. Independent Living, where appropriate Adult living, daily living, independent living, financial, transportation, etc. Community Involvement (Recommended but NOT Specifically Referenced In IDEIA) Specific outcomes related to being a member of a community and democratic citizen. (May be included under Independent Living area.) Measurable Postsecondary Goal Areas

77 76 Should measurable postsecondary goals be specific? Initially, broad descriptions of the students preferences, interests, or vision of what he/she might like to do in employment, education, training, and independent living. Each year reassess and refine. Should be specific and measurable one year out by last year/IEP.

78 77 Must there be a measurable postsecondary goal in each area? YES for Education/Training and Employment Can be combined into one all-inclusive goal or two or three separate goals OPTIONAL – (Where appropriate) Independent living Community involvement (NOT referenced in IDEIA)

79 78 Lifelong Learners Measurable Postsecondary Goals Postsecondary Education/ Training Community Involvement (including a social network & having fun!) Employment Independent/ Supported Living FOR SALE Houses 'R' us Realty SOLD

80 79 Lifelong Learners Measurable Postsecondary Goals Employment

81 80 Measurable Postsecondary Goals Employment Considerations To be independently employed as ____ To be Independently employed?? A job with some support A job with long term support Employment through an adult service provider Sheltered employment

82 81 Examples Employment: Juan will be employed full-time as a nail technician. I will work with machines although Im not sure what type. Rose will work in a retail business where she has the opportunity to interact with many people throughout the day. I will work with support from my coworkers at Starbucks Coffee.

83 82 Lifelong Learners Measurable Postsecondary Goals Employment Postsecondary Education/ Training

84 83 Measurable Postsecondary Goals Education/Training Considerations Four year college or university to gain a degree in a specific area Four year college – unsure of area Community college prior to university Community college Community college for nonacademic courses

85 84 Attend TRC or other technological training center/institute Vocational training in specific area of study Non-academic classes at the local library, UT Extension Program, etc. Measurable Postsecondary Goals Education/Training Considerations (continued)

86 85 Examples: Post-Secondary Education/Training I will take classes at the community college in the evenings to develop a hobby in an area of personal interest such as photography or gardening. Macy will enroll in the local Adult Basic Education Program to continue developing her reading, writing, and math skills. Jake will explore possible career options through classes at Alpha Community College and will continue to take technical courses at school. I will enroll at TN State University in the Fall 2009

87 86 Lifelong Learners Measurable Postsecondary Goals Employment Independent/ Supported Living FOR SALE Houses 'R' us Realty SOLD Postsecondary Education/ Training

88 87 Measurable Postsecondary Goals: Independent/Supported Living Considerations Live independently Live in a supervised arrangement Live with a friend Live on a military base Live in a dorm Live in a group home Live in a family home with support Live in a specialized care facility

89 88 Examples Independent/Supported Living I will live in an apartment near my parents with my best friend Lisa. I will live in an apartment near my parents with my best friend Lisa. Jake will live in an apartment close to the community college he will attend when he exits high school. I will live with my parents to save money before I get married. After high school, Mary will live with a roommate in an apartment. FOR SALE Houses 'R' us Realty SOLD

90 89 Lifelong Learners Measurable Postsecondary Goals Community Involvement (including a social network & having fun!) Employment Independent/ Supported Living FOR SALE Houses 'R' us Realty SOLD Postsecondary Education/ Training

91 90 Measurable Post Secondary Goals Community Involvement Considerations To be independently mobile in the community and access services To be independent with support for transportation To access community with family or friends To access community with a provider To be active in local politics by … To volunteer at …..

92 91 To participate independently in specific activities To join specific facilities To engage in specific activities with family or friends To engage in specific activities with a provider To participate in group activities supported by a provider Measurable Post Secondary Goals Community Involvement Considerations (continued)

93 92 Examples Community Involvement Takisha will volunteer at the local Homeless Rescue Mission, but will need to find someone to support her physical needs there. I will join the YWCA in her hometown and take exercise classes at least three times a week. Jake will remain active in his church and engage in routine activities with his neighborhood buddies. I will talk to high school students about the importance of volunteering in the community

94 93 Question 13: Is there a measurable post secondary goal or goals that covers education or training, employment, and, as needed, independent living? A. education/training___yes ___no ___ N/A B. employment ___yes ___no ___ N/A C. where appropriate, independent living skills ___yes ___no ___ N/A Question 14: Is (are) there annual IEP goal(s) that will reasonably enable the child to meet the postsecondary goal(s)? ___yes ___no TRANSITION REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST

95 94 Can a Student have More than One Postsecondary Goal in a Postsecondary Goal Area? Yes For instance: postsecondary goals for residential and community participation under the area of Independent Living

96 95 1. Training/Education After high school, I/David will get on the job training to become a farmer. 2. Employment After high school, I/David will work full time as a farmer. EXAMPLE #1 (as two separate goals)

97 96 OR (as a combined goal) 1. Training/Education and Employment After high school, I/David will get on the job training while working full time as a farmer.

98 97 Example #2 (as two separate goals) 1. Training/Education After high school, I/Mary will enroll at UW-Eau Claire in the teacher training program. 2. Employment After high school, I/Mary plan(s) to work full time as a teacher.

99 98 OR (as a combined goal) 1. Training/Education and Employment After high school, I/Mary will enroll full time at UW-Eau Claire to prepare me/her to work full time as a teacher.

100 99 1.Training/Education After high school, Eric will get on the job training in an area related to dirt bike racing. 2. Employment After high school, Eric will work full time with dirt bikes. 3. Independent Living After high school, Eric will live in an apartment with friends. 14 year old student with a specific learning disability

101 year old student with a specific learning disability 1. Training/Education After high school, I will enroll full time at UW-Eau Claire in the nursing program. 2. Employment After high school, I will work full time as a nurse.

102 101 Example Postsecondary Goals National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Centers September 2006 Upon completion of high school, John will enroll in the general Associates Degree program at Ocean County Community College in August of (Separate – education or training) Jason will get his undergraduate degree in history and education, to become a high school social studies teacher. (Combo – education or training and employment)

103 102 Transition Services Planning Student Name: Billy Ray Jones DOB: 02/29/1986 SMALL TOWN PUBLIC SCHOOLS IEP Meeting Date: 05/20/2006 Employment:Post-Secondary Education/Training: Billy Ray will work in a green house or for a nursery. Billy Ray will go off to college like his friends. His mother suggested some course work at a community college or even a technical school before college. Independent/Supported Living: Community Involvement: Billy Ray will live separate from his parents but does not want to live by himself. His parents would like him to have a supportive roommate (for pay if needed.) Billy Ray will work in the community, shop for his own needs with help from his mom or a friend, go out to eat, attend church, and rent movies on his own. Desired Post School Outcomes

104 103 SMALL CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS IEP Meeting Date: 05/21/2006 Student Name: Patti Smith DOB: 05/29/1988 Transition Services Planning (Beginning at age 14, or younger) Has a comprehensive vocational evaluation been administered? (Optional)[ X ] Yes[ ] No Desired Post School Outcomes Employment:Post-Secondary Education/Training: Patti will work at least hours a week in a retail job, like Maceys, Wal-Mart or Goodys. Patti will attend classes at the Adult Improvement Center Independent/Supported Living: Community Involvement: Patti will live in a supported apartment with her cat Sneaky and possibly a roommate. Patti will use the YWCA, attend church activities weekly, and possibly attend classes at the Adult Improvement Center. One day she plans to meet a man just like her dad and get married. She does not want to have any kids of her own!

105 104 Transition Services Planning (Beginning at age 14, or younger) Has a comprehensive vocational evaluation been administered? (Optional)[ ] Yes[ X ] No Desired Post School Outcomes Employment:Post-Secondary Education/Training: Star will work in a hospital or doctors office as an ultrasound technician. Star will go to ACME Community College. Independent/Supported Living:Community Involvement: Star will live in her own apartment until she can save enough money to buy her own house. Star will continue to be involved in church, in the Smoky Mtn. Hiking club, & with her family & friends. Transition Services Needed (Beginning at age 16, or younger) Grade 9 Course of Study: English I, Creative Writing, Physical Science, General Music, Wellness & Teen Living, World Geography Grade 10 Course of Study: Culinary Arts, Math Foundations, English II, Biology I, Wellness & Teen Living, Chorus Grade 11 Course of Study: Math Foundations II, Algebra I, Economics, English III, Government, American history, computer science, chorus Grade 12 Course of Study: Algebra II, English IV, Health Occupations, Work-Based Learning/Health Occupations, Chorus, sociology, drivers education. ACME PUBLIC SCHOOLS IEP Meeting Date: 05/20/2006 Student Name: Star Elaine Brownlow DOB: 12/29/1986

106 105 1.Find your winter partner. 2.Assuming you have discussed with your targeted student his/her goals and dreams, help each other draft your students current Desired Post School Outcomes for each major area. Be prepared to share. Are there unanswered questions you needed prior to drafting one or more outcomes? SHARE

107 106 Transition Services Plan Checklist To assist IEP teams in addressing a comprehensive and coordinated set of activities across the 4-6 year transition process. Transition Planning is a PROCESS The IEP team cannot get it all done in one year! (4-6 Years) Introducing the…..

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109 108

110 109 I = Instruction RS = Related Services CE = Community Experiences E&ALO = Employment and Post-School Adult Living Options DLO = Daily Living Objectives FVE = Functional Vocational Evaluation ALI = Agency Linkage and/or Involvement

111 110 A. Instruction? B. Related services? C. Community experiences? D. Employment and other post school adult living objectives? E. When appropriate, acquisition of daily living objectives? F. When appropriate, functional vocational evaluation? TRANSITION REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST Question 16: Are there transition services in the IEP that focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child to facilitate their movement from school to post-school?

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113 112

114 113 Action 1 Share with the student and his/her parent(s)/guardian(s) information concerning the transition process, including the recommended actions needed for transitioning from high school to work and/or postsecondary institutions of higher education. Provide student and parent(s)/ guardian(s) with information and materials on post school employment and post secondary education options, agencies and resources. WHEN: Yearly TS code: ALI

115 114 Employment Options Employment Options Competitive Employment Supported Employment Self-employment Self-employment Personalized job development Personalized job development Part-Time Employment

116 115 Employment Resources Employment Resources Division of Mental Retardation Services One-Stop Career Centers Social Security Administration, including the Ticket-to-Work Division of Rehabilitation Services Local adults service providers

117 116 Post-Secondary Education/ Training Options Technology Centers Junior College 2 Year College (Private Institution) 2 Year College (Public Institution) 4 Year College/University (Private Institution) 4 Year College/University (Public Institution) Visit: for more information on TN state IHEswww.TN-AHEAD.org

118 117 Disabilities Services Coordinators from various IHEs

119 118 Community Involvement Options & Resources Volunteer organizations Political organizations Church organizations Neighborhood organizations YMCA/YWCA/Fitness Center Community Sports Leagues

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126 125 Using your Transition Services Plan Checklist, note any areas that have not been addressed on Action 1 for your targeted student.


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