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© 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning, a part of the Thomson Corporation. Fundamentals of Pharmacology for Veterinary Technicians Chapter 5 Veterinary Drug.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning, a part of the Thomson Corporation. Fundamentals of Pharmacology for Veterinary Technicians Chapter 5 Veterinary Drug."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning, a part of the Thomson Corporation. Fundamentals of Pharmacology for Veterinary Technicians Chapter 5 Veterinary Drug Use and Prescribing

2 © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning, a part of the Thomson Corporation. Types of Drugs Chemical name: –Provides scientific and technical information –Is a precise description of the substance –Example: 7-chloro-1,3-dihydro-1-methyl-5-phenyl-2H-1,4- benzodiazepin-2-one

3 © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning, a part of the Thomson Corporation. Types of Drugs Generic (nonproprietary) name: –Official identifying name of the drug (assigned by the U.S. Adopted Names Council) –Describes the active drug –Written using lowercase letters –Example: diazepam Brand (trade, proprietary) name: –Establishes legal proprietary recognition for the corporation that developed the drug –Is registered with the U.S. Patent Office and is used only by the company that registered the drug –Is written in capital letters or begins with a capital letter and has a circled, superscript R by its name –Example: Valium

4 © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning, a part of the Thomson Corporation. Sources of Drug Information United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) –Publication that is the legally recognized drug standard of the United States –Describes the source, appearance, properties, standards of purity, and other requirements of the most important pure drugs –The FDA requires that all drugs meet USP standards of purity, quality, and uniformity Drug label –Label on drug bottle or vial must contain: Drug names (generic and trade) Drug concentration and quantity Name and address of manufacturer Manufacturers control or lot number Expiration date of drug Withdrawal time (if warranted) Controlled substance status of drug (if warranted)

5 © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning, a part of the Thomson Corporation. Sources of Drug Information Package insert –Provided with drugs to meet regulatory requirements Registered trade name, generic name, controlled substance notation if warranted Description or composition statement Clinical pharmacology, actions, or mode of action Indications and usage Contraindications Precautions Warnings Adverse reactions or side effects Overdosage information Dosage administration Storage How supplied

6 © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning, a part of the Thomson Corporation. Package Insert

7 © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning, a part of the Thomson Corporation. Sources of Drug Information Drug References –Bound book of information on package inserts Physicians Desk Reference (PDR): human-approved drugs Veterinary Pharmaceuticals and Biologicals (VPB) Compendium of Veterinary Products (CVP)

8 © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning, a part of the Thomson Corporation. Expiration Dates Expiration date is the date before which a drug meets all specifications and after which the drug can no longer be used Expiration dates are assigned based on the stability of or experience with the drug Expiration dates for drugs that are mixed in the clinic vary depending on the reconstitution and refrigeration status of the drugs

9 © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning, a part of the Thomson Corporation. Drugs Used in Veterinary Practice Veterinary drugs are those approved only for use in animals Human drugs are approved by the FDA and guidelines for their use in food- producing animals is provided in the Compliance Policy Guide A veterinarian/client/patient relationship must be established before any medication is prescribed for an animal –Guidelines for veterinarian/client/patient relationships are provided in Table 5-2

10 © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning, a part of the Thomson Corporation. Prescriptions A prescription is an order to a pharmacist, written by a licensed veterinarian, to prepare the prescribed medicine, to affix the directions, and to sell the preparation to the client

11 © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning, a part of the Thomson Corporation. Dispensing Drugs Prescription drugs may be dispensed by pharmacists or trained veterinary staff Veterinary prescription drugs should be properly labeled when dispensed Remember that veterinary staff members cannot refill or dispense medications without veterinarian approval Medications must be dispensed in childproof containers Labels with cautionary statements may also be used on the prescription

12 © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning, a part of the Thomson Corporation. Label on the Prescription The label on the prescription should be complete and contain: –The name and address of the dispenser –The clients name (+/- address) –The animals name and species –The drug name, strength, and quantity –The date of the order –Directions for use –Any refill information (if warranted)

13 © 2004 by Thomson Delmar Learning, a part of the Thomson Corporation. Parts of a Prescription Label


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