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PROTOCOL UPDATE ALABAMA EMS PROTOCOLS PARAMEDIC EDITION 5 JUNE, 2010 UPDATE 1.

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Presentation on theme: "PROTOCOL UPDATE ALABAMA EMS PROTOCOLS PARAMEDIC EDITION 5 JUNE, 2010 UPDATE 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 PROTOCOL UPDATE ALABAMA EMS PROTOCOLS PARAMEDIC EDITION 5 JUNE, 2010 UPDATE 1

2 PROTOCOL UPDATE IF YOU IDENTIFY MISTAKES IN THE PROTOCOLS OR IF YOU HAVE SUGGESTIONS FOR PROTOCOL CHANGES IF YOU IDENTIFY MISTAKES IN THE PROTOCOLS OR IF YOU HAVE SUGGESTIONS FOR PROTOCOL CHANGES 2

3 PURPOSE OF PROTOCOLS IMPROVE PATIENT CARE IMPROVE PATIENT CARE PROVIDE OFF-LINE MEDICAL DIRECTION PROVIDE OFF-LINE MEDICAL DIRECTION REPRESENT STANDARD OF CARE REPRESENT STANDARD OF CARE PROVIDE QI STANDARDS PROVIDE QI STANDARDS PROVIDE EDUCATION STANDARDS PROVIDE EDUCATION STANDARDS 3

4 TITLE PAGE & TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS UPDATED WITH CHANGES TABLE OF CONTENTS UPDATED WITH CHANGES –Added two new Patient Care Protocols 4.26 Respiratory Illness/Influenza 4.27 Respiratory Illness – Mass Casualty Emergency Renumbered: –4.28 Seizures –4.29 Shock –4.30 Stroke –4.31 Suspected Spinal Injury –4.32 Syncope –4.33 Vaginal Bleeding –4.34 Vomiting and Nausea 4

5 SECTION 4 TREATMENT PROTOCOLS 5

6 ALLERGIC REACTION 4.4 Because it is more rapidly absorbed and reaches higher blood levels, IM epinephrine for allergic reactions is now preferred to SQ epinephrine Because it is more rapidly absorbed and reaches higher blood levels, IM epinephrine for allergic reactions is now preferred to SQ epinephrine IV epinephrine has been associated with iatrogenic overdoses and cardiac complications and its use for allergic reactions is discouraged except for anaphylactic shock where the 1:10,000 solution can be given but is Category B IV epinephrine has been associated with iatrogenic overdoses and cardiac complications and its use for allergic reactions is discouraged except for anaphylactic shock where the 1:10,000 solution can be given but is Category B The 1:1000 solution is NEVER given IV The 1:1000 solution is NEVER given IV The Epipen can still be used but its needle may be too short to reach the muscle in some obese patients The Epipen can still be used but its needle may be too short to reach the muscle in some obese patients 6

7 CARDIAC ARREST 4.8 Under Physical Assessment, Part B changed closed chest massage to chest compressions to reflect current terminology Under Physical Assessment, Part B changed closed chest massage to chest compressions to reflect current terminology 7

8 CARDIAC ARREST 4.8 Treatment of adult VFib/Pulseless Vtach, Part J: Treatment of adult VFib/Pulseless Vtach, Part J: –Added that if you substitute vasopressin for the first dose of epinephrine, you can give subsequent doses of epinephrine –Because of the current shortage of 1:10,000 epinephrine this may temporarily have to be the preferred medication for Vfib/Pulseless Vtach in adults 8

9 CARDIAC MEDICATIONS 4.9 Corrected category of Amiodarone (Cat. A) Corrected category of Amiodarone (Cat. A) 9

10 CARDIAC SYMPTOMS/ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME 4.10 Added wording to stress that women, diabetics, and all adult medical patients over the age of 50 years have an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Added wording to stress that women, diabetics, and all adult medical patients over the age of 50 years have an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Also stressed that all adult patients complaining of epigastric pain should have an ECG performed Also stressed that all adult patients complaining of epigastric pain should have an ECG performed Noted that all Ambulance services must have the capability to perform 12-lead ECGs on patients by June of 2013 Noted that all Ambulance services must have the capability to perform 12-lead ECGs on patients by June of

11 CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE 4.14 Changed dose of Furosemide from Changed dose of Furosemide from 20-40mg to 40mg to simplify the dosage 11

12 4.26 Respiratory Illness/Influenza NEW PROTOCOL For Routine Use During a Flu Epidemic 12

13 4.26 Respiratory Illness/Influenza 1. Follow General Patient Care Protocol Be sure you are using appropriate standard precautions A. If Dispatch advises of the potential for acute febrile respiratory illness symptoms on scene, you should don PPE for suspected cases of influenza prior to entering the scene. This includes disposable N-95 mask, eye protection (shield or goggles), and disposable non-sterile gloves. B. If Dispatch has not identified individuals with symptoms of acute febrile respiratory illness symptoms on scene, you should stay more than 6 feet away from the patient and bystanders with symptoms and exercise appropriate routine respiratory droplet precautions while assessing all patients for suspected cases of influenza. If patient has signs or symptoms of influenza, you should don the PPE described above before coming in close contact with the patient. 13

14 4.26 Respiratory Illness/Influenza 3. Signs and Symptoms of Influenza : a. Rapid onset of symptoms b. Difficulty breathing with exertion c. Doctor has already diagnosed influenza d. Cough e. Fever f. Shaking Chills g. Pleuritic chest pain h. Sore throat (no difficulty breathing or swallowing) i. Nasal congestion j. Runny nose k. Muscle aches l. Headache 14

15 4.26 Respiratory Illness/Influenza 4. All EMS personnel engaged in aerosol generating activities (e.g. endotracheal intubation, bag-mask ventilation, nebulizer treatment, or CPAP [use expiratory filter]) should wear the PPE described in 2.a. 5. All patients with acute febrile respiratory illness should wear a surgical mask, if tolerated by the patient. 6. Encourage good patient compartment vehicle airflow/ventilation (turn on exhaust fan) to reduce the concentration of aerosol accumulation when possible. 15

16 4.26 Respiratory Illness/Influenza TRANSPORT OF PATIENTS TO HEALTHCARE FACILITIES When transporting a patient with symptoms of acute febrile respiratory illness, you should notify the receiving healthcare facility so that appropriate infection control precautions may be taken prior to patient arrival. Patients with febrile respiratory illness should wear a surgical mask, if tolerated. When transporting a patient with symptoms of acute febrile respiratory illness, you should notify the receiving healthcare facility so that appropriate infection control precautions may be taken prior to patient arrival. Patients with febrile respiratory illness should wear a surgical mask, if tolerated. 16

17 4.26 Respiratory Illness/Influenza INTERFACILITY TRANSPORT EMS personnel involved in the transfer of patients with confirmed influenza or suspected infectious respiratory illness should use standard droplet and contact precautions for all patient care activities. This should include wearing disposable N-95 mask, eye protection [shield or goggles], disposable non-sterile gloves and gown. If the transported patient can tolerate a surgical mask, its use can help to minimize the spread of infectious droplets in the patient care compartment. Encourage good patient compartment vehicle airflow/ventilation (turn on exhaust fan) to reduce the concentration of aerosol accumulation when possible. Any nonessential equipment that can be removed from the patient compartment of the ambulance before transport will hasten the time needed to disinfect and return to service. EMS personnel involved in the transfer of patients with confirmed influenza or suspected infectious respiratory illness should use standard droplet and contact precautions for all patient care activities. This should include wearing disposable N-95 mask, eye protection [shield or goggles], disposable non-sterile gloves and gown. If the transported patient can tolerate a surgical mask, its use can help to minimize the spread of infectious droplets in the patient care compartment. Encourage good patient compartment vehicle airflow/ventilation (turn on exhaust fan) to reduce the concentration of aerosol accumulation when possible. Any nonessential equipment that can be removed from the patient compartment of the ambulance before transport will hasten the time needed to disinfect and return to service. 17

18 4.26 Respiratory Illness/Influenza CLEANING VEHICLE AFTER TRANSPORTING AN INFLUENZA PATIENT After the patient has been removed and prior to cleaning, the air within the vehicle may be exhausted by opening the doors and windows of the vehicle while the ventilation system is running. This should be done outdoors and away from pedestrian traffic. Routine cleaning methods should be employed throughout the vehicle and on non-disposable equipment. After the patient has been removed and prior to cleaning, the air within the vehicle may be exhausted by opening the doors and windows of the vehicle while the ventilation system is running. This should be done outdoors and away from pedestrian traffic. Routine cleaning methods should be employed throughout the vehicle and on non-disposable equipment. Routine cleaning with soap or detergent and water to remove soil and organic matter, followed by the proper use of disinfectants, are the basic components of effective environmental management of influenza. Reducing the number of influenza virus particles on a surface through these steps can reduce the chance of hand transfer of virus particles. Influenza viruses are susceptible to inactivation by a number of chemical disinfectants readily available from consumer and commercial sources. Routine cleaning with soap or detergent and water to remove soil and organic matter, followed by the proper use of disinfectants, are the basic components of effective environmental management of influenza. Reducing the number of influenza virus particles on a surface through these steps can reduce the chance of hand transfer of virus particles. Influenza viruses are susceptible to inactivation by a number of chemical disinfectants readily available from consumer and commercial sources. 18

19 4.27 Respiratory Illness/Influenza MASS CASUALTY EMERGENCY NEW PROTOCOL Not for Routine Use 19

20 4.27 Respiratory Illness/Influenza MASS CASUALTY EMERGENCY This protocol is designed to be implemented only when there is a significant respiratory disease that has impacted the health care system to the extent that hospital beds are full, few or no ventilators are available for new patients with respiratory failure, the EMS/Dispatch work force is significantly depleted due to absenteeism, and the calls for EMS support overwhelm resources to manage all calls. When the Governor proclaims a state of emergency, the Alabama Public Health Department (ADPH) Office of EMS & Trauma (OEMS&T) will activate this protocol to provide authorization for the adjustment in the prehospital standard of care. Depending upon the Governors proclamation, ADPH OEMS&T may activate this protocol statewide or on a regional or local basis. This protocol is designed to be implemented only when there is a significant respiratory disease that has impacted the health care system to the extent that hospital beds are full, few or no ventilators are available for new patients with respiratory failure, the EMS/Dispatch work force is significantly depleted due to absenteeism, and the calls for EMS support overwhelm resources to manage all calls. When the Governor proclaims a state of emergency, the Alabama Public Health Department (ADPH) Office of EMS & Trauma (OEMS&T) will activate this protocol to provide authorization for the adjustment in the prehospital standard of care. Depending upon the Governors proclamation, ADPH OEMS&T may activate this protocol statewide or on a regional or local basis. 20

21 4.27 Respiratory Illness/Influenza MASS CASUALTY EMERGENCY 1.Follow General Patient Care Protocol Be sure you are using appropriate standard precautions A. If Dispatch advises of the potential for acute febrile respiratory illness symptoms on scene, you should don PPE for suspected cases of influenza prior to entering the scene. This includes disposable N-95 mask, eye protection (shield or goggles), and disposable non-sterile gloves. B. If Dispatch has not identified individuals with symptoms of acute febrile respiratory illness symptoms on scene, you should stay more than 6 feet away from the patient and bystanders with symptoms and exercise appropriate routine respiratory droplet precautions while assessing all patients for suspected cases of influenza. If patient has signs or symptoms of influenza, you should don the PPE described above before coming in close contact with the patient. 21

22 4.27 Respiratory Illness/Influenza MASS CASUALTY EMERGENCY 3.Signs and Symptoms of Influenza Rapid onset of symptoms Rapid onset of symptoms Difficulty breathing with exertion Difficulty breathing with exertion Doctor has already diagnosed influenza Doctor has already diagnosed influenza Cough Cough Fever Fever Shaking Chills Shaking Chills Pleuritic chest pain Pleuritic chest pain Sore throat (no difficulty breathing or swallowing) Sore throat (no difficulty breathing or swallowing) Nasal congestion Nasal congestion Runny nose Runny nose Muscle aches Muscle aches Headache Headache 22

23 4.27 Respiratory Illness/Influenza MASS CASUALTY EMERGENCY 4. If patient has critical vital signs, immediately transport to Emergency Department a.Critical Vital Signs: Adult If present, immediately transport to an Emergency Department Pulse: equal or greater than 130 beats per minute Pulse: equal or greater than 130 beats per minute Respiratory Rate: equal or greater than 30 breaths per minute Respiratory Rate: equal or greater than 30 breaths per minute Systolic Blood Pressure: Less than 90 mm/Hg Systolic Blood Pressure: Less than 90 mm/Hg Pulse Oximeter: Less than 92 on room air Pulse Oximeter: Less than 92 on room air Temperature: Febrile Temperature: Febrile Level of Consciousness: Responds only to Pain or is Unresponsive Level of Consciousness: Responds only to Pain or is Unresponsive Lung sounds: Rales or Wheezing Lung sounds: Rales or Wheezing 23

24 24 Capillary refill:> 2 seconds Resp. rate: 45 or increased work of breathing 45 or increased work of breathing 45 or increased work of breathing Systolic Blood pressure< 60 mmHg< 70 mmHgUnder age 10 < 70 + (2 X age in years) Pulse Oximeter< 92 on room air TemperatureFebrile Level of Consciousnessresponds only to pain or is unresponsive Lung soundsRales or Wheezing Critical Vital Signs: Pediatric: If present, immediately transport to Emergency Department Vital Signs Neonates Infants Children

25 4.27 Respiratory Illness/Influenza MASS CASUALTY EMERGENCY 5. If patient has normal vital signs, then evaluate for signs and symptoms of influenza. a. Normal Vital Signs Adult with respiratory illness Pulse: Less than 130 beats per minute Pulse: Less than 130 beats per minute Respiratory Rate: Less than 30 breaths per minute Respiratory Rate: Less than 30 breaths per minute Systolic Blood Pressure: equal or greater than 91 mmHg Systolic Blood Pressure: equal or greater than 91 mmHg Pulse Oximeter equal or greater than 92 Pulse Oximeter equal or greater than 92 Temperature: Afebrile Temperature: Afebrile Level of Consciousness: Alert or responds to verbal stimuli Level of Consciousness: Alert or responds to verbal stimuli Lung sounds: Clear Lung sounds: Clear 25

26 26 Capillary refill:< 2 seconds Unlabored breathing or resp. rate: Systolic Blood pressure> 60 mmHg> 70 mmHgUnder age 10 > 70 + (2 X age in years) Pulse Oximeter> 92 TemperatureAfebrile Level of ConsciousnessAlert or responds to verbal stimuli Alert Lung soundsClear b. Normal Vital Signs Pediatric Patient with Respiratory Illness Vital Signs Neonates Infants Children

27 4.27 Respiratory Illness/Influenza MASS CASUALTY EMERGENCY 6. If patient has three (3) or more signs or symptoms of influenza, transport patient to alternate care facility (if available). 7. If patient has two (2) or fewer signs or symptoms of influenza, call On-line Medical Direction (OLMD) to determine if patient may be left on-scene, self quarantine, and refer to nurse/public health hotline (insert phone number here) for further assistance. 8. Endotracheal intubation should not be performed on any patient except by direct order of the OLMD physician (Cat. B). 9. Because of the danger of EMS personnel becoming infected, aerosol-generating procedures such as advanced airway procedures, use of bag-mask, and nebulizer treatments should not be performed on patients with acute febrile respiratory illness except by direct order of the OLMD physician (Cat. B). CPAP with expiratory filter is still Category A. 27

28 4.27 Respiratory Illness/Influenza MASS CASUALTY EMERGENCY 10.If OLMD orders advanced airway procedures, use of bag-mask, or nebulizer treatments on a patient with acute febrile respiratory illness, EMS personnel must be in PPE as described in 2.a above. 11.All patients with acute febrile respiratory illness should wear a surgical mask, if tolerated by the patient. 12.Encourage good patient compartment vehicle airflow/ventilation (turn on exhaust fan) to reduce the concentration of aerosol accumulation when possible. 28

29 4.27 Respiratory Illness/Influenza MASS CASUALTY EMERGENCY TRANSPORT OF PATIENTS TO HEALTHCARE FACILITIES When transporting a patient with symptoms of acute febrile respiratory illness, you should notify the receiving healthcare facility so that appropriate infection control precautions may be taken prior to patient arrival. Patients with febrile respiratory illness should wear a surgical mask, if tolerated. When transporting a patient with symptoms of acute febrile respiratory illness, you should notify the receiving healthcare facility so that appropriate infection control precautions may be taken prior to patient arrival. Patients with febrile respiratory illness should wear a surgical mask, if tolerated. 29

30 4.27 Respiratory Illness/Influenza MASS CASUALTY EMERGENCY INTERFACILITY TRANSPORT EMS personnel involved in the transfer of patients with confirmed influenza or suspected infectious respiratory illness should use standard droplet and contact precautions for all patient care activities. This should include wearing disposable N-95 mask, eye protection [shield or goggles], disposable non-sterile gloves and gown. If the transported patient can tolerate a surgical mask, its use can help to minimize the spread of infectious droplets in the patient care compartment. Encourage good patient compartment vehicle airflow/ventilation (turn on exhaust fan) to reduce the concentration of aerosol accumulation when possible. Any nonessential equipment that can be removed from the patient compartment of the ambulance before transport will hasten the time needed to disinfect and return to service. EMS personnel involved in the transfer of patients with confirmed influenza or suspected infectious respiratory illness should use standard droplet and contact precautions for all patient care activities. This should include wearing disposable N-95 mask, eye protection [shield or goggles], disposable non-sterile gloves and gown. If the transported patient can tolerate a surgical mask, its use can help to minimize the spread of infectious droplets in the patient care compartment. Encourage good patient compartment vehicle airflow/ventilation (turn on exhaust fan) to reduce the concentration of aerosol accumulation when possible. Any nonessential equipment that can be removed from the patient compartment of the ambulance before transport will hasten the time needed to disinfect and return to service. 30

31 4.27 Respiratory Illness/Influenza MASS CASUALTY EMERGENCY CLEANING VEHICLE AFTER TRANSPORTING AN INFLUENZA PATIENT After the patient has been removed and prior to cleaning, the air within the vehicle may be exhausted by opening the doors and windows of the vehicle while the ventilation system is running. This should be done outdoors and away from pedestrian traffic. Routine cleaning methods should be employed throughout the vehicle and on non-disposable equipment. After the patient has been removed and prior to cleaning, the air within the vehicle may be exhausted by opening the doors and windows of the vehicle while the ventilation system is running. This should be done outdoors and away from pedestrian traffic. Routine cleaning methods should be employed throughout the vehicle and on non-disposable equipment. Routine cleaning with soap or detergent and water to remove soil and organic matter, followed by the proper use of disinfectants, are the basic components of effective environmental management of influenza. Reducing the number of influenza virus particles on a surface through these steps can reduce the chance of hand transfer of virus particles. Influenza viruses are susceptible to inactivation by a number of chemical disinfectants readily available from consumer and commercial sources. Routine cleaning with soap or detergent and water to remove soil and organic matter, followed by the proper use of disinfectants, are the basic components of effective environmental management of influenza. Reducing the number of influenza virus particles on a surface through these steps can reduce the chance of hand transfer of virus particles. Influenza viruses are susceptible to inactivation by a number of chemical disinfectants readily available from consumer and commercial sources. 31

32 STROKE 4.30 Added that the EMS personnel should attempt to bring a knowledgeable friend or family member with the stroke patient Added that the EMS personnel should attempt to bring a knowledgeable friend or family member with the stroke patient Added that if the patient with stroke symptoms has no signs of CHF then they should receive a 500cc IV bolus of Normal Saline Added that if the patient with stroke symptoms has no signs of CHF then they should receive a 500cc IV bolus of Normal Saline Added under SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS: Many patients with stroke are taking diuretics and are volume depleted. Administer one bolus of fluid as noted above, unless there are obvious signs of acute heart failure. This may improve cerebral circulation. Added under SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS: Many patients with stroke are taking diuretics and are volume depleted. Administer one bolus of fluid as noted above, unless there are obvious signs of acute heart failure. This may improve cerebral circulation. 32

33 4.34 VOMITING AND NAUSEA Changed name to Vomiting and Nausea Changed name to Vomiting and Nausea Under Specific Information Needed added: Under Specific Information Needed added: B. Is the patient nauseated? C. If vomiting, is the cause known? K. History of vomiting when receiving narcotics? 33

34 4.34 VOMITING AND NAUSEA Under NOTES: added: Under NOTES: added: 1. Ondansetron may be used in cases of nausea to prevent vomiting 2. Ondansetron may be used to prevent nausea when administering morphine, especially if there is a history of vomiting after receiving narcotics 34

35 SECTION 5 MEDICATIONS 35

36 5.10 DIPHENHYDRAMINE Changed :dystonic reaction to extrapyramidal symptoms or extrapyramidal reaction to reflect current terminology in EMS texts Changed :dystonic reaction to extrapyramidal symptoms or extrapyramidal reaction to reflect current terminology in EMS texts 36

37 5.12 EPINEPHRINE Changed administration to IM for allergic reaction except for anaphylactic shock where it can be given IVP if the doctor orders (CAT B) Changed administration to IM for allergic reaction except for anaphylactic shock where it can be given IVP if the doctor orders (CAT B) Stressed that the 1:1000 solution (vial) is never given IV Stressed that the 1:1000 solution (vial) is never given IV 37

38 5.13 FUROSEMIDE Changed dose from 20-40mg to 40mg to simplify the dose Changed dose from 20-40mg to 40mg to simplify the dose 38

39 SECTION 6 PROCEDURES 39

40 6.5 ENDOTRACHEAL INTUBATION Under PROCEDURE added: Under PROCEDURE added: 7. Monitor tube placement with qualitative CO2 detector or preferably a quantitative waveform CO2 monitor (Use of one or the other is MANDATORY) After June 2013 the waveform capnography will be required. After June 2013 the waveform capnography will be required. 40

41 6.5 ENDOTRACHEAL INTUBATION Under NOTES added: Under NOTES added: 6. BY June 2013 all ALS services must have the ability to monitor patients with waveform capnography 41

42

43 Tube Confirmation?

44 Abnormal Capnogram Apnea Apnea Complete loss of waveform indicates no CO 2 present Complete loss of waveform indicates no CO 2 present Tube misplacement or dislodged Tube misplacement or dislodged Apnea Apnea Complete loss of waveform indicates no CO 2 present Complete loss of waveform indicates no CO 2 present Tube misplacement or dislodged Tube misplacement or dislodged

45 CASE STUDY Single Vehicle Deceleration MVC Single Unrestrained Male Victim Single Unrestrained Male Victim Obvious closed head injury with coma Obvious closed head injury with coma Complex laceration of face and scalp Complex laceration of face and scalp Bleeding from mouth and nose Bleeding from mouth and nose Bilateral rib injuries but no flail chest Bilateral rib injuries but no flail chest

46 CASE STUDY BLS ambulance service – rapid transport BLS ambulance service – rapid transport Initial Vitals: Initial Vitals: –Resp. 20 bpm –SBP 107mmHg –Pulse 110 bpm –SPO2 78% –ETCO2 monitor not yet attached –GCS 7

47 CASE STUDY Patient immediately intubated using RSI Patient immediately intubated using RSI Vitals after intubation: Vitals after intubation: –Resp. 12 bpm by vent –SBP 85mmHg –Pulse 118 bpm –SPO2 67% –ETCO2 44 –GCS 3

48 CO2 Waveform

49

50 WHAT SHOULD BE DONE? WHAT ABOUT THE SEVERE HYPOXIA? WHAT ABOUT THE SEVERE HYPOXIA? IS THE TUBE IN THE TRACHEA? IS THE TUBE IN THE TRACHEA? SHOULD THE TUBE BE REPLACED? SHOULD THE TUBE BE REPLACED?

51 CASE STUDY In spite of hypoxia tube was left in place because CO2 level and waveform confirmed tube was in place In spite of hypoxia tube was left in place because CO2 level and waveform confirmed tube was in place Patient found to have bilateral pulmonary contusions causing the hypoxia plus internal bleeding causing shock Patient found to have bilateral pulmonary contusions causing the hypoxia plus internal bleeding causing shock Also had ruptured trachea with development of severe edema Also had ruptured trachea with development of severe edema –If tube had been pulled it probably could not have been replaced

52

53 ENDOTRACHEAL INTUBATION 6.5 Added that orotracheal intubation is CAT. B for children and nasotracheal intubation is contraindicated in children Added that orotracheal intubation is CAT. B for children and nasotracheal intubation is contraindicated in children THIS IS FROM LAST YEARS UPDATE!!! THIS IS FROM LAST YEARS UPDATE!!! 53

54 SECTION 9 ACCEPTABLE EMS EQUIPMENT AND DEVICES 54

55 9.1 BLIND INSERTION AIRWAY DEVICES Noted that the King Airway may be used if the service medical director approves Noted that the King Airway may be used if the service medical director approves 55

56 WHAT ABOUT TOURNIQUETS? 56

57 57 CAT Tourniquet

58 58

59 59

60 60

61 61 RATCHET TOURNIQUET

62 62 MAT Tourniquet

63 ALERT! BEFORE USING NEW PRTOTOCOLS: EACH SERVICE MUST NOTIFY AND PROVIDE YOUR SERVICE OFF-LINE MEDICAL DIRECTOR A COPY OF THE 5 TH EDITION PROTOCOLS (June 2010 edition) AND A COPY OF THIS UPDATE PRESENTATION EACH SERVICE MUST NOTIFY AND PROVIDE YOUR SERVICE OFF-LINE MEDICAL DIRECTOR A COPY OF THE 5 TH EDITION PROTOCOLS (June 2010 edition) AND A COPY OF THIS UPDATE PRESENTATION –It is OK for the medical director to download the material instead EACH SERVICE MUST BE SURE THE ON-LINE MEDICAL DIRECTORS AT YOUR MEDICAL DIRECTION HOSPITALS ARE AWARE THAT THE PROTOCOLS HAVE BEEN UPDATED AND WHERE TO GET THE MATERIAL EACH SERVICE MUST BE SURE THE ON-LINE MEDICAL DIRECTORS AT YOUR MEDICAL DIRECTION HOSPITALS ARE AWARE THAT THE PROTOCOLS HAVE BEEN UPDATED AND WHERE TO GET THE MATERIAL –The service is not responsible for furnishing copies of the protocols or update slide presentation 63

64 NEW PROTOCOLS CAN BE USED WHEN EVERYONE IN A SERVICE HAS BEEN UPDATED WHEN EVERYONE IN A SERVICE HAS BEEN UPDATED –TURNED ON SERVICE BY SERVICE NOT INDIVIDUAL BY INDIVIDUAL –TURN IN ROSTER TO REGIONAL EMS AGENCY NOT TO OFFICE OF EMS & TRAUMA Also acknowledge that you have updated your off-line medical director and provided copy of protocols Also acknowledge that you have updated your off-line medical director and provided copy of protocols –REGIONAL EMS AGENCY WILL NOTIFY YOU WHEN YOU CAN START USING NEW PROTOCOLS –EVERY SERVICE MUST BE UPDATED BY OCTOBER 1 ST,

65 QUESTIONS?

66 BREMSS STEMI SYSTEM UPDATE

67 STEMI / ISSUES Machine Read/Interpretation Over-Triage Definitions

68 STEMI This term used throughout the plan refers to the current STEMI definition by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines of ST segment elevations greater than or equal to 1mm in 2 or more contiguous limb leads or greater than or equal to 2mm in 2 or more contiguous precordial leads lacking features of non-infarction causes of ST-segment elevation (e.g. early repolarization, pericarditis, left ventricular hypertrophy, incomplete bundle branch block.)

69 Cardiovascular Disease Progression HEART DISEASE Acute Myocardial Infarction ST E levation M yocardial I nfarction

70 Cardiovascular Disease Progression HEART DISEASEAcute Myocardial Infarction ST E levation M yocardial I nfarction ECG Normal Arteriolosclerosis Atherosclerosis Hypertension ?

71 HEART DISEASEAcute Myocardial Infarction ST E levation M yocardial I nfarction ECG NormalECG Normal or Dysrhythmia ArteriolosclerosisChest Pain Arm Pain Jaw Pain AtherosclerosisSilent - 50 % Hypertension ?ST- Normal Deviation

72 HEART DISEASEAcute Myocardial Infarction ST E levation M yocardial I nfarction ECG NormalECG Normal or Dysrhythmia 1MM > 2 > contiguous limb leads ArteriolosclerosisChest Pain Arm Pain Jaw Pain 2 MM > 2 >contiguous precordial leads AtherosclerosisSilent - 50 % Hypertension ?ST- Normal Deviation

73 STEMI EMT-P DISCRETION –not a STEMI UNLESS – OLMD agrees ATCC will connect

74 AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION ECC UPDATE

75 GUIDELINES 2010 Released to media on October 18 Released to National Faculty on Nov. 11 Instructor updates via webinar Make sure ALL instructors have current username / password for instructor network Stay in touch!

76 How to stay in touch? State newsletter BREMSS newsletter Send BREMSS your address


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