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Some slides from Patrick Corrigan PhD, IL Institute of Technology, international stigma researcher WISE Basics Increasing Inclusion, Hope and Support Beating.

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Presentation on theme: "Some slides from Patrick Corrigan PhD, IL Institute of Technology, international stigma researcher WISE Basics Increasing Inclusion, Hope and Support Beating."— Presentation transcript:

1 Some slides from Patrick Corrigan PhD, IL Institute of Technology, international stigma researcher WISE Basics Increasing Inclusion, Hope and Support Beating the Stigma of Mental Illness

2 Statewide collaboration of organizations and individuals. Promote evidence based practices, current research and outcomes evaluation. Majority speak from experience of stigma and recovery. Offer insights, resources, and support for stigma reduction

3 WISE Active Partners: Care Connections (Waukesha County NAMI Support Group) Center for Suicide Awareness COPE Services Dry Hootch Grassroots Empowerment Project Illinois Institute of Technology LaCrosse Mental Health Coalition Latino Health Coalition – Mental Health Action Team MHA Wisconsin Milwaukee Center for Independence Marian University NAMI WI, Greater Milwaukee & Racine Prevent Suicide WI Rogers InHealth University of WI Milwaukee and Madison WI Department of Health Services WI Family Ties WI United for Mental Health ETC.

4  Explore stigma ◦ Public stigma ◦ Internalized shame  Frame stigma change  Connect to your work and that of WISE GOALS 4

5  IIT – Patrick Corrigan PhD  Yale  U Penn  Rutgers  Temple National Consortium on Stigma and Empowerment

6 schizophrenia depression trauma anxiety eating disorders Drug and alcohol abuse EPIDEMIC? 1 in 4 47% in our lifetime

7 What is stigma? Where does it come from?

8 8 Stigma Definition and Types Stigma Definition  Stereotype-ideas  Prejudice-beliefs  Discrimination- actions Types  Internalized Shame  Public  Structural

9 9  STEREOTYPE ◦ People with MI are: weak, dangerous….  PREJUDICE ◦ They are bad because: scary, shameful.  DISCRIMINATION ◦ So, don’t: hire, serve, rent to them Example of Public Stigma

10 Avoidance and apathy  self esteem So, why try? I am not good Internalized Shame Public Stigma  sense of efficacy I am not able

11 11 Racial Discrimination

12 12 Religious Discrimination

13 Gender Discrimination

14 Co-Occurring Stigma (public and internalized)  Heterosexism  Racism  Sexism  Ableism  Etc YRBS data showed LGBT youth in WI had: - 5X the rate of suicide attempts - 3X more likely to skip school due to feeling unsafe - 50% felt like they did not belong at school

15 15 In the movies People with mental illness are dangerous

16 16 People with mental illness are dangerous In the newspapers

17 17 In advertising People with mental illness are dangerous

18 What’s the harm?

19

20 20 “Benevolent” Stigma People with mental illness are lovable and incapable

21 21 OK, but isn’t it better lately?

22 Trenton State Hospital has fire. July 10 th, 2002

23 23

24  The false idea that people with mental illness are more dangerous has increased Phelan, Link et al 24

25 …and remains high.  DANGER Phelan, Link et al 25

26 Examples of Discrimination?

27 Public Stigma: It’s Impact on SOCIAL INCLUSION  Lost employment  Subpar housing  Worse health care  Diminished education opportunities  Alienated from faith community

28  Protest  Education  Contact 28 Stigma Change Processes

29 29  Protest ◦ Review stigmatizing images ◦ “Shame on you for thinking that way”

30 30  Unintended consequences of well intended actions  “The white bear”  Beware of the rebound effect

31 31  Education Review key myths and facts that counter these myths

32  Myth : People with serious mental illness can not care for themselves; need to be institutionalized.  Fact : Long term follow-up research suggests 2/3rds of people with schizophrenia learn to live with their disabilities.  RECOVERY is the rule

33  Myth : People with serious mental illness are dangerous.  Fact : People with untreated mental illness are slightly more dangerous especially when using drugs or alcohol BUT… ◦ They are more likely to be victims of violence

34 Schomerus, Schwann, Holzinger, Corrigan, Grabe, Carta, & Angermeyer, 2011 DOES STIGMA DECREASE AS KNOWLEDGE INCREASES?  Knowledge: Causes of Mental Illness  Stigma: Acceptance

35 Schomerus, Schwann, Holzinger, Corrigan, Grabe, Carta, & Angermeyer, 2011 Brain Disease META-ANALYSIS FINDINGS: CAUSE

36 Schomerus, Schwann, Holzinger, Corrigan, Grabe, Carta, & Angermeyer, 2011 Neighbor META-ANALYSIS FINDINGS: ACCEPTANCE

37  Impact? ◦ Blame went down ◦ Belief in recovery also went down Decade of the Brain

38 38  Contact “Meet Bob Lundin”

39 39  Bob’s story ◦ My name is ______ and I have a severe mental illness called schizo-affective disorder ◦ My childhood was not unusual… ◦ Unfortunately, my mental illness was traumatic. It did not go away quickly… ◦ Despite these problems, I have achieved several accomplishments.

40

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42 Avoidance: from pre to 1-month follow-up

43 What a DIFFERENCE a friend makes!

44 44

45 45 Website visits

46 46 Effect Size 100 MILLION thousands

47 47 Effect Size 100 MILLION thousands Just going to the site is not enough 88% left after one minute!

48 48 Framing Stigma Change Protest Education Contact Media- based XXX XXXX LiveXXX XXXXXX vehiclevehicle processes

49

50 Yet, there exists a curtain of ignorance about recovery.

51 A process of change through which people work to improve their own health and wellbeing, live a self- directed life, and strive to achieve their full potential. SAMHSA’s four essential dimensions of recovery: ◦ Health ◦ Home ◦ Purpose ◦ Community

52  Targeted  Local  Credible  Continuous  Change-focused  Contact TLC4 52

53 Who Should the TARGETS Be? Health care professionals Employers Landlords Teachers Legislators Faith communities

54 x MILWAUKEE Does it play in Wausau? What is LOCAL Contact?

55  City  Office  Church, synagogue, mosque  Workplace  School 55 Local

56  Contact with peer  Example- Nurse to nurse Pastor to pastor Football player to football player What is CREDIBLE Contact? 56

57  Once is not enough  And variety is needed CONTINUOUS Contact 57

58  What do you want the target group to do differently as a result of the contact? CHANGE-FOCUSED Contact

59  Targeted  Local  Credible  Continuous  Change-focused  Contact TLC4 59

60 the Grand Plan Speak up everyone Speak up everywhere Honest, Open & Proud “strategic disclosure”

61 Levels of Disclosure  Social Avoidance – avoid situations  Secrecy – work to keep it a secret  Selective Disclosure – share it with select people  Open Disclosure – no longer hide it  Broadcast Your Experience – actively share it

62 62

63 Your Recovery Story

64 Engage Organizations Seeking to Reduce Discrimination Train/Support Storytellers General Public Programs/Contact Components: 1.WiSE Basics Discussion 2.Support for Strategic Disclosure HOP 3.Consultation as Organizations Apply TLC4 4.WiSE Guide to Design, Implement and Evaluate Plans 5.Statewide Evaluation

65 SIX WAYS TO END STIGMA TOGETHER 1. Seek out people with lived experience - listen to their story. 2. Reinforce & support their resilience & recovery. 3. Wear lime green to create curiosity - be prepared to speak up. 4. Consider the story you can tell about recovery 5. Share other’s stories – for short video stories go to Rogersinhealth.org 6. Bring the conversation to your community – work, civic, faith, schools

66 Story and Discussion


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