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TODAY’S PRESENTATION: COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS Welcome Back Teachers!

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Presentation on theme: "TODAY’S PRESENTATION: COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS Welcome Back Teachers!"— Presentation transcript:

1 TODAY’S PRESENTATION: COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS Welcome Back Teachers!

2 DANETTE MORRELL The Welcome

3 Please Note: On your handouts, you should have: Group Color Letter A or B Classroom Number (for the PM session) Please sit with your group (by color)

4 Please sit with your group/facilitator BlackSheri Hart Bright YellowDanette Morrell BlueMike Sterner GreenTracie Baughn PinkAdrienne Rodriguez RedPatti Mendez GrayFernando O’Campo BrownCraig Lyon OrangePatty Quijada

5 The Norms Be present to the information by:  Turning off or silencing all electronic devices  Limiting side-bar conversations  Being proactive and participating in all activities  Being on-time

6 YOU GO FIRST! Change is Good…

7 SHERI HART A New Vision

8 WHY? Sir Ken Robinson

9 1. THINK ABOUT THE VIDEO 2. WRITE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THE HANDOUT 3. DISCUSS WITH A PARTNER FROM YOUR COLOR GROUP 4. REPORT TO THE GROUP T-P-S

10 AN OVERVIEW HAYDEE RODRIGUEZ SLIDES ADAPTED FROM NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SECONDARY SCHOOL PRINCIPALS (NASSP) AND COLLEGE BOARD PRESENTATION Common Core State Standards Smarter Balanced Assessments

11 What is the Common Core? 11 A state-led effort to develop a common set of standards in English language arts and math that: Align college and workplace expectations Are rigorous and evidence-based The CCSS have been adopted by 46 states The CCSS will affect all public schools in adopted states Implementation beginning now New state assessments in A parallel effort is underway to develop Next Generation Science Standards that will be released by December

12 Why Common Core State Standards? Issue #1: Inconsistent State Standards 12

13 Remediation rates and costs are staggering As much as 40% of all students entering 4-year colleges need remediation in one or more courses As much as 63% in 2-year colleges Degree attainment rates are disappointing Fewer than 42% of adults aged hold college degrees Source: The College Completion Agenda 2010 Progress Report, The College Board 13 Why Common Core State Standards? Issue #2: Low College Completion Rates 13

14 Why Common Core State Standards? Issue #3: More Students Need a More Rigorous Curriculum 14 Adelman et al. (2003)  15% of students in the top quintile in academic rigor required remediation  57% of students in the bottom quintile in academic rigor required remediation Adelman (2006)  83% of students whose highest math class was calculus graduated within 8 years  40% of students whose highest math class was Algebra II graduated within 8 years

15 Features of the Common Core State Standards English Language Arts 15 Balance between informational text and literature Comprehending complex texts Writing in response to texts Conducting and reporting on research Language and grammar skills Speaking and listening Cross-content literacy 15

16 Cross-content Literacy Literacy Standards for:  History/Social Studies  Science  Technical Subjects We are all literacy teachers!

17 Features of the Common Core State Standards – Math 17 Emphasis on mathematical practices Attention to focus and coherence Increased focus on algebra in middle grades Problem solving and reasoning Mathematical modeling Standards for STEM readiness 17

18 Common Core: A Fast Timeline 18 June 2009 Beginning of CCSS Initiative March 2010 K-12 Draft Released for Public Comment June 2010 Formal Release of K- 12 CCSS Dec States Have Adopted CCSS Participating States Administer New CCSS Assessments Implementati on is NOW!

19 What comes next after adoption? Understanding current alignment Changes in curriculum & instruction Preparing for new assessments Professional Development Implementation 19

20 Understanding Current Alignment 20 To what degree does the Common Core and state standards address the same content knowledge and skills? Content Alignment Are the state standards and assessments at the same level of rigor as the Common Core? Rigor Do the state standards and assessments address Common Core content at the same grade level? Progression Alignment is one of the first steps for states and districts towards implementing the Common Core. 20

21 Changes in Curriculum and Instruction 21 To what degree will district and state curricula need to change to be aligned to the Common Core? Curriculum Alignment What new instructional approaches are needed to teach to these new standards? Instructional Strategies What new resources and instructional materials are needed? What resources are available? Materials and Resources The Common Core will require significant curricular and instructional shifts that will impact all classrooms. 21

22 Professional Development 22 To effectively implement and embrace the Common Core, rich professional development will be required. Unpacking the standards Content-specific workshops Assessing the standards Cross-content literacy For Teachers Vertical teaming and vertical alignment Observing the Common Core in the classroom Implementing a cross-content literacy program Building local assessments; preparing for common assessments For School Leaders 22

23 Common Assessments-Two consortia 23 The assessment systems will: Provide a common measure of college and career readiness Be computer-based and include innovative item types Measure higher order skills and application of knowledge through multiple assessment formats Include formative assessments and performance tasks Provide timely data to educators and parents Ensure comparable expectations regardless of where students live Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) for California

24 FROM SUSAN PIMENTEL Design and Organization of the Standards

25 Design and Organization College and Career Readiness (CCR) Anchor Standards provide focus and coherence

26 Design and Organization K−12 standards  Grade-specific end- of-year expectations  Cumulative progression of skills and understandings  One-to-one correspondence with CCR standards

27 BEGINNING WITH THE END IN MIND MARILYN BURT Common Core State Standards

28 GRADE 08 Question Read the Grade 08 Sample Question After you read the question: THINK about the question posed on the handout WRITE your answer to the question DISCUSS with a partner from your color group REPORT to your group

29 Scoring Notes Response should specify that several testing types are necessary to ensure the water is safe for humans and other organisms. Tests need to take place frequently because the water quality can improve or worsen in a short amount of time. Support from the text may include but is not limited to: Scientists must measure the temperature of water, pH level, the amount of bacteria in the water, its toxicity etc…

30 Your thoughts… What do our students need to know and be able to do to be successful on this type of assessment question? At what level of Bloom’s Taxonomy is this question written?

31 In order to succeed, OUR Students Must READ: Rhetorically Critically Analytically Closely

32 A MINI LESSON Rhetorical, Critical, Analytical, and Close READING

33 What is rhetoric? THE ART OF USING LANGUAGE IN A WAY THAT IS EFFECTIVE OR THAT INFLUENCES PEOPLE

34 Reading Rhetorically What is the writer’s purpose(s) ? What does the writer say ? How does the writer say it?

35 Why read rhetorically? A writer’s goal is usually to change a reader’s understanding of a topic in some way A writer will try to persuade the reader directly and indirectly, by selecting and arranging evidence, choosing examples, including or omitting material, selecting words or images

36 What is an ARGUMENT? A claim an author makes on how things should be Supported by evidence Evidence can be research, statistics, examples, personal experience, stories, quotations

37 Listen to a Text With the grain Try to understand the author’s ideas, views, and intentions Try to understand and consider the ideas fairly and accurately before rushing to judgment

38 What is the topic? What is the author’s opinion, viewpoint, ideas about this topic?

39 Question the Text Against the grain Try to read analytically and skeptically Try to interrogate the claims and evidence Make sound judgments and thoughtful responses The text is not always RIGHT, FACTUAL, or TRUE

40 More on Close Reading Later…

41 TO BEGIN LEARNING THE SPECIFIC TERMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE CCSS… A GLOSSARY OF TERMS

42 GLOSSARY ACTIVITIES STEP ONE: INFO GAP Find a partner within your color group that has the information you do not have in your glossary and fill in the blanks Note if you are a Partner “A” or “B” When finished, move to steps two and three

43 STEP TWO: LINE UPS STEP THREE: LINE UPS Line up in your groups 10 people in each row facing each other (“A”s on one side and “B”s on the other) “A”s read the 1 st word and “B”s read the definition “As” read one of the questions ( on bottom of forms) “B”s give their answers “A”s move to the end of the line (you will now have a new partner) “B”s read the 2 nd word and “A”s read the definition “B”s read one question, “A”s give their answers Repeat for all glossary terms Practicing Academic Language

44 Line Ups-Step Three Questions 1. What do you know about this term already? 2. How will this term (concept) apply to your teaching? 3. What more do you need to know about this term (concept)?

45 PLEASE TAKE A 15 MINUTE BREAK AND RETURN PROMPTLY AT 10:10 AM Break Time!

46 MATH CUHS ALGEBRA I PLC Common Core State Standards

47 Mathematics Assessment Question Read the HS Math Sample Question After you read the question: THINK about the question posed on the handout WRITE your answer to the question DISCUSS with a partner from your color group REPORT to your group

48 Your thoughts… What do our students need to know and be able to do to be successful on this type of assessment question? At what level of Bloom’s Taxonomy is this question written?

49 Common Core Standards Overview: Toward Greater Focus and Coherence Avoid the problem of “mile wide and an inch deep” Avoid the problem of “mile wide and an inch deep” Aim for clarity and specificity © 2011 California County Superintendents Educational Services Association Mathematics General Overview Recognize that “fewer standards” are no substitute for focused standards

50 Coherence Design Topics and performances are logical over time Based on learning progressions research on how students learn Reflect hierarchical nature of the content Evolve from particulars to deeper structures © 2011 California County Superintendents Educational Services Association Mathematics General Overview

51 Common Core State Standards Define what students should understand and be able to do in their study of mathematics  Is the ability to justify appropriate to student’s math maturity  Understanding and procedural skill are equally important and can be assessed using tasks of sufficient richness Are internationally benchmarked  Reflect rigor, focus and coherence of standards in top- performing countries © 2011 California County Superintendents Educational Services Association Mathematics General Overview

52 Common Core State Standards Do:  Set grade-level standards K-8  Identify standards for Algebra 1  Provide conceptual cluster standards in high school  Provide clear signposts along the way toward the goal of college and career readiness for all students © 2011 California County Superintendents Educational Services Association Mathematics General Overview

53 Common Core Standards Do not:  Define intervention methods or materials  Define the full range of supports for English learners, students with special needs and students who are well above or below grade level expectations  Dictate curriculum or teaching methods © 2011 California County Superintendents Educational Services Association Mathematics General Overview

54 Common Core Standards for Mathematics: Two Types  Mathematical Practice (recurring throughout the grades)  Mathematical Content (different at each grade level) Standards for Mathematical Practice…  “ …describe ways in which developing student practitioners of the discipline of mathematics increasingly ought to engage with the subject matter as they grow in mathematical maturity and expertise throughout the elementary, middle and high schools years.” © 2011 California County Superintendents Educational Services Association Mathematics General Overview

55 Standards for Mathematical Practice Mathematically proficient students: 1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them …start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively …make sense of quantities and their relationships to problem situations 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others … understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments 4. Model with mathematics …can apply the mathematics they know to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace © 2011 California County Superintendents Educational Services Association Mathematics General Overview

56 Standards for Mathematical Practice Mathematically proficient students: 5. Use appropriate tools strategically …consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem 6. Attend to precision …calculate accurately and efficiently 7. Look for and make use of structure …look closely to discern a pattern or structure 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning …notice if calculations are repeated, and look for both general methods and for shortcuts © 2011 California County Superintendents Educational Services Association Mathematics General Overview

57 California Grade 8 Options Goal for 8 th grade students is Algebra 1 Not all students have the necessary prerequisite skills for Algebra 1 Two sets of standards for grade 8  Each set will prepare students for college and career  Standards for Algebra 1  Taken from 8 th grade Common Core, high school Algebra content cluster and CA Algebra standards  8 th grade Common Core Goal of grade 8 Common Core is to finalize preparation for students in high school K-7 standards as augmented prepare students for either set of standards © 2011 California County Superintendents Educational Services Association Mathematics General Overview

58 Mathematics Standards for High School Number and Quantity Algebra Functions Modeling Geometry Statistics and Probability © 2011 California County Superintendents Educational Services Association Mathematics General Overview Arranged by conceptual cluster (NOT by course):

59 Mathematics Standards for High School Specify the math that all students should study to be college and career ready Identify additional math standards that students should learn in order to take advanced courses such as calculus, advanced statistics, or discrete mathematics. These are indicated by (+). Include the addition of two courses from California:  Calculus  Advanced Placement Statistics and Probability Development of suggested course descriptions will be done by CDE as part of their long-range implementation plan  Traditional vs. Integrated © 2011 California County Superintendents Educational Services Association Mathematics General Overview

60 Some comparison examples © 2011 California County Superintendents Educational Services Association Mathematics General Overview

61 Some comparison examples © 2011 California County Superintendents Educational Services Association Mathematics General Overview

62 Some comparison examples © 2011 California County Superintendents Educational Services Association Mathematics General Overview

63 What Now? Stay the Course!  More similarities than differences in the standards  Implement a truly balanced math program as this will support the mathematical practices  Continue to use quality assessments to inform and drive effective instruction  Provide opportunities for teachers to collaborate and plan © 2011 California County Superintendents Educational Services Association Mathematics General Overview

64 TRAVIS FUSI AND PATTY QUIJADA English Language Arts and Literacy

65 ELA Grade 11 Assessment Question Read the Grade 11 Sample Question After you read the question: THINK about the question posed on the handout WRITE your answer to the question DISCUSS with a partner from your color group REPORT to your group

66 Your thoughts… What do our students need to know and be able to do be successful on this type of assessment question? At what level of Bloom’s Taxonomy is this question written?

67 ELA Content Clusters- 9/10, 11/12 1. Reading Standards for Lit (9) 2. Reading Standards for Info. Texts (10) 3. Writing Standards (10) 4. Speaking and Listening Standards (6) 5. Language Standards (6)  41 Standards Total at 9/10  41 Standards Total at 11/12

68 Articulation and Rigor Both vertical and horizontal articulation are built into the Common Core Standards. Rigor will increase at each grade level in all mainstream classes. CCSS has worked with College Board to achieve this.

69 Shifts From the Current Standards Language standards focus on three-tiered approach to vocabulary development- everyday language, academic language, content specific vocabulary. Knowledge of language, including word choice and word derivations, is of emphasis. Language skills are progressive over grades 3-12.

70 Shifts From the Current Standards Information and Literary Texts will focus on close reading and increased text complexity with literary texts decreasing in use from 50/50 in earlier grades to 70/30 in high school. Students will be required to support their assessment answers with text Close and re-reading activities will increase.

71 Shifts From the Current Standards This is an integrated program that promotes cross- content literacy- It is no longer the job of just the English Department to teach reading and literacy. Each content area will be doing this with their own materials.

72 LITERACY STANDARDS Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

73 TEXT COMPLEXITY CLOSE READING AND MORE… Important things to know from the Literacy Standards:

74 READING Challenges Among the highest priorities of the CCSS is a requirement that students be able to demonstrate their independent capacity to read at the appropriate level of complexity and depth. Many students will need careful instruction-including effective scaffolding-to enable them to read at the level of text complexity required by the CCSS. Nicole Franks, Senior Content Developer-Pearson Ed

75 WHY IS IT SO IMPORTANT, AND HOW DO WE KNOW THAT WHAT WE ASK OUR STUDENTS TO READ IS “COMPLEX”? FROM WORK BY SUSAN PIMENTEL, Text Complexity…

76 The Crisis of Text Complexity Gap between college and high school texts is huge: o HS textbooks have declined in all subject areas over several decades o Average length of sentences in K-8 textbooks have declined from 20 to 14 words o Vocabulary demands have declined, e.g., 8 th grade textbooks= former 5 th grade texts; 12 th grade anthologies=former 7 th grade How much should we worry about this?

77 ACT Study Tells Us To Worry A Lot Not the type or level of Question… … But the degree of Text Complexity that students could handle that predicts their success!

78 Recap of ACT Findings Question type (main idea, word meanings, details) is NOT the chief differentiator between students scoring above and below the benchmark. Question level (higher order vs. lower order; literal vs. inferential) is NOT the chief differentiator between students either. What students could read, in terms of its complexity--rather than what they could do with what they read--is greatest predictor of success. Likelihood of success under unless students answer at least 40 percent of complex text questions correctly.

79 The Common Core Standards’ Three-Part Model of Text Complexity

80 1. Qualitative dimensions (aspects of text best measured by attentive human readers), 2. Quantitative dimensions (aspects of text such as word length/frequency, sentence length, cohesion best measured by computer algorithms) and 3. Reader and task considerations (variables such as the reader’s cognitive capabilities, motivation, reading purpose, and the knowledge and experiences unique to each reader).

81 ALIAS CRITICAL READING ANALYTICAL READING RHETORICAL READING CLOSE READING

82 Close Reading Defined… Engaging with a text directly Examining its meaning thoroughly and methodically Using texts of grade-level appropriateness and complexity Focusing student reading on the particular words, phrases, sentences and paragraphs of the author’s work Read and re-read deliberately

83 Close Reading and the CCSS Four steps of analysis are reflected in four types of reading and discussion: 1. What a text says – (CCSS – Anchor Reading #1) Restatement 2. What a text does – (CCSS – Anchor Reading #3, 4, and 5) Description 3. What a text means – (CCSS – Anchor Reading #2, 6,and 8) Interpretation 4. So what does it mean to me? – (CCSS – Anchor Reading #7 and 9) Application All Four Questions: (CCSS – Anchor Reading #10)

84 Close Reading The Four Corners of Text – ALL Content ALL the Time… Read #1What does the text say? What a text says – RESTATEMENT How does it say it? What a text does – DESCRIPTION Read #2What does it mean? What a text means – INTERPRETATION So what does it mean to me? So what? – APPLICATION

85 BETSY LANE ASSESSMENTS

86 SMARTER BALANCED ASSESSMENT CONSORTIUM (SBAC) VS. PARTNERSHIP FOR ASSESSMENT OF READINESS FOR COLLEGE AND CAREERS (PARCC) ADAPTED FROM SDCOE PRESENTATION Assessments

87 Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) 26 states / 31 million students  12 governing states  Florida is fiscal agent  ACHIEVE is Project Manager Assessment at Grades 3 through 8 and once in Grades  End-of-year comprehensive assessment  During the year “through course” focused assessments

88 SMARTER Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) (California’s Option) 31 states / 21 million students  17 governing states  Washington is fiscal agent  WestEd is Project Manager Assessment at Grades 3 through 8 and Grade 11  Summative end-of-year assessments  Optional interim assessments  Optional web-based formative assessment resources

89 California’s Choice CA originally agreed to belong to PARCC PARCC states agreed to “Value added” model meaning that assessment results will be a factor in the evaluation of teacher and leadership effectiveness CA opted out of PARCC and into SBAC for this reason

90 SBAC Theory of Action Common Core State Standards specify K-12 expectations for college & career readiness Adaptive summative assessments benchmarked to college & career readiness Teachers can access formative tools and practices to improve instruction Interim assessments that are flexible and open All students leave high school college and career ready

91 PERFORMANCE TASKS END OF YEAR ADAPTIVE ASSESSMENT A computer adaptive assessment given during final weeks of the school year* Multiple item types, scored by computer SBAC: Summative Assessment One reading task, one writing task and 2 math tasks per year Measure the ability to integrate knowledge and skills, as required in CCSS Computer-delivered, during final 12 weeks of the school year* Scored within 2 weeks Student scores from the performance tasks and end-of-year adaptive assessment will be combined for each student’s annual score for accountability. +

92 SBAC Assessment System Components Computer Adaptive Summative Assessments (paper and pencil versions optional through ) Optional Computer Adaptive Interim Assessments Optional Formative Processes and Tools  Optional assessments should be a state-level cost, but will likely come at the district’s expense

93 Benefits of Adaptive Testing Faster Results Shorter Test Length Increased Precision Tailored to Suit Ability Greater Security Mature Technology

94 Six Item Types Selected Response Constructed Response Extended Response Performance Tasks Technology-enabled Technology-enhanced

95 STAR Testing CDE looking at each STAR assessment to complete an inventory of how the exams align to CCSS CDE attempting to determine the future of the STAR tests given the switch to SBAC in

96 CAHSEE CA state still has CAHSEE law in place If CAHSEE survives, it will have to be changed as it measures the 1998 standards As of 14-15, it will no longer be used for AYP/API (11 th grade assessment will be) 11 th grade assessment could be used as the state’s exit exam Legislative activity could expand a new “CHASEE” to other subject areas

97 FAQs (and As) No assessments planned below 3rd grade Optional Interim Assessments are designed to provide “actionable” information about student progress throughout the year Optional Interim Assessments will include the same types of items and performance tasks as the summative assessments Timing and frequency of interim assessments will be locally determined

98 FAQs (and As) continued SBAC is developing up to 6 performance tasks for grades 9 and 10 for both ELA and mathematics 11 th grade assessment will be recognized by colleges and universities as a valid measure of college readiness

99 We can do this! CCSS is to Nissan as CA State Standards are to dune buggy REMEMBER: SHIFT HAPPENS!

100 After Lunch: Meet back here… Deconstructing the Literacy Standards


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