Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Cost Theory EA Session 7 July 13, 2007 Prof. Samar K. Datta.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Cost Theory EA Session 7 July 13, 2007 Prof. Samar K. Datta."— Presentation transcript:

1 Cost Theory EA Session 7 July 13, 2007 Prof. Samar K. Datta

2 Overview Short run costs Long run costs & economies of scale Economies of scope & product transformation curve

3 SHORT RUN COSTS Marginal Cost (MC) is the cost of expanding output by one unit => MC = dTC/dQ Average Total Cost (ATC) is the cost per unit of output, or average fixed cost (AFC) plus average variable cost (AVC) => ATC = TC/Q = TFC/Q + TVC/Q = AFC + AVC The relationship between the production function and cost can be exemplified by: – Increasing returns With increasing returns, output is increasing relative to input and variable cost and total cost will fall relative to output. – Decreasing returns With decreasing returns, output is decreasing relative to input and variable cost and total cost will rise relative to output.

4 Cost Curves for a Firm The line drawn from the origin to the tangent of the variable cost curve: – Its slope equals AVC – The slope of a point on VC equals MC – Therefore, MC = AVC at 7 units of output (point A) Output P FC VC A TC

5 Cost Curves for a Firm Unit Costs – AFC falls continuously – When MC < AVC or MC < ATC, AVC & ATC decrease – When MC > AVC or MC > ATC, AVC & ATC increase – When MC = AVC = ATC then AVC and ATC are at minimum Output (units/yr.) Cost ($ per unit) MC ATC AVC AFC

6 PRODUCING A GIVEN OUTPUT AT MINIMUM COST Labor per year Capital per year Isocost C 2 shows quantity Q 1 can be produced with combination K 2 L 2 or K 3 L 3. However, both of these are higher cost combinations than K 1 L 1. Q1Q1 Q 1 is an isoquant for output Q 1. Isocost curve C 0 shows all combinations of K and L that cost C 0. C0C0 C1C1 C2C2 C O C 1 C 2 are three isocost lines A K1K1 L1L1 K3K3 L3L3 K2K2 L2L2

7 Long-Run Expansion Path The long-run expansion path is drawn as before.. THE INFLEXIBILITY OF SHORT- RUN PRODUCTION Labor per year Capital per year L2L2 Q2Q2 K2K2 D C F E Q1Q1 A B L1L1 K1K1 L3L3 P Short-Run Expansion Path

8 – Constant Returns to Scale If input is doubled, output will double and average cost is constant at all levels of output. – Increasing Returns to Scale If input is doubled, output will more than double and average cost decreases at all levels of output. – Decreasing Returns to Scale If input is doubled, the increase in output is less than twice as large and average cost increases with output. RETURNS TO SCALE

9 LONG-RUN AVERAGE AND MARGINAL COST Output Cost ($ per unit of output LAC LMC A

10 Measuring Economies of Scale Therefore, the following is true: – E C < 1: MC < AC economies of scale – E C = 1: MC = AC constant economies of scale – E C > 1: MC > AC diseconomies of scale ECONOMIES AND DISECONOMIES OF SCALE

11 LONG-RUN COST WITH CONSTANT RETURNS TO SCALE Output Cost ($ per unit of output) Q3Q3 SAC 3 SMC 3 Q2Q2 SAC 2 SMC 2 Q1Q1 SAC 1 SMC 1 LAC = LMC With many plant sizes with minimum SAC = $10 the LAC = LMC and is a straight line $10

12 LONG-RUN COST WITH ECONOMIES AND DISECONOMIES OF SCALE Output Cost ($ per unit of output SMC 1 SAC 1 SAC 2 SMC 2 LMC If the output is Q 1 a manager would chose the small plant SAC 1 and SAC $8. Point B is on the LAC because it is a least cost plant for a given output. $10 Q1Q1 $8 B A LAC SAC 3 SMC 3 The long-run average cost curve is the envelope of the firms short-run average cost curves, assuming continually variable plant size. The long-run cost curve is the dark blue portion of the SAC curve which represents the minimum cost for any level of output, assuming only three discrete plant sizes.

13 Economies of scope exist when the joint output of a single firm is greater than the output that could be achieved by two different firms each producing a single output. – Firms must choose how much of each to produce. – The alternative combinations can be illustrated using product transformation curves. ECONOMIES OF SCOPE

14 PRODUCT TRANSFORMATION CURVE Number of cars Number of tractors O2O2 O 1 illustrates a low level of output. O 2 illustrates a higher level of output with two times as much labor and capital. O1O1 Each curve shows combinations of output with a given combination of L & K.

15 The degree of economies of scope measures the savings in cost and can be written: – C(Q 1 ) is the cost of producing Q 1 – C(Q 2 ) is the cost of producing Q 2 – C(Q 1 Q 2 ) is the joint cost of producing both products – If SC > 0 -- Economies of scope – If SC < 0 -- Diseconomies of scope ECONOMIES OF SCOPE

16 DYNAMIC CHANGES IN COSTS – THE LEARNING CURVE (optional) The learning curve measures the impact of workers experience on the costs of production. It describes the relationship between a firms cumulative output and amount of inputs needed to produce a unit of output.

17 The learning curve in the figure is based on the relationship: DYNAMIC CHANGES IN COSTS –THE LEARNING CURVE (optional)

18 – L equals A + B and this measures labor input to produce the first unit of output – Labor input remains constant as the cumulative level of output increases, so there is no learning DYNAMIC CHANGES IN COSTS –THE LEARNING CURVE (optional)

19 – L approaches A, and A represent minimum labor input/unit of output after all learning has taken place. – The more important the learning effect. DYNAMIC CHANGES IN COSTS – THE LEARNING CURVE (optional)

20 Cumulative number of machine lots produced Hours of labor per machine lot The chart shows a sharp drop in lots to a cumulative amount of 20, then small savings at higher levels. Doubling cumulative output causes a 20% reduction in the difference between the input required and minimum attainable input requirement.

21 ECONOMIES OF SCALE VERSUS LEARNING (optional) Output Cost ($ per unit of output) LAC 1 B Economies of Scale A LAC 2 Learning C


Download ppt "Cost Theory EA Session 7 July 13, 2007 Prof. Samar K. Datta."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google