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Perceptions and Effects of the Positive Behavior Interventions and Support (PBIS) Crystal Chapa Lynnette Coggins Lynnette Coggins Audrey Medlin Audrey.

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Presentation on theme: "Perceptions and Effects of the Positive Behavior Interventions and Support (PBIS) Crystal Chapa Lynnette Coggins Lynnette Coggins Audrey Medlin Audrey."— Presentation transcript:

1 Perceptions and Effects of the Positive Behavior Interventions and Support (PBIS) Crystal Chapa Lynnette Coggins Lynnette Coggins Audrey Medlin Audrey Medlin Casey Wescott Casey Wescott Oakland University Research Symposium May 2013

2 Introduction  Although widely used, exclusionary punishment is not effective.  Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) program has become widely implemented.  Evaluation of PBIS program’s implementation at West Middle School was necessary

3 Evaluation Questions  What are the perceptions of Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) at Grand Blanc West Middle School?  How do student and staff perceptions affect the success of Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) in decreasing negative behaviors at school?

4 Background of PBIS  PBIS provides school-wide expectations, consistent consequences and incentives  Incentives include individual, classroom and school-wide rewards  Program implemented and evaluated by the assistant principal and counseling staff (PBIS PLC)  All classroom teachers and staff are expected to comply with PBIS procedures and practices.

5 Assumptions and Limitations  Assumptions PBIS fully implemented at Grand Blanc West Middle School. PBIS fully implemented at Grand Blanc West Middle School. No other behavior program being used at this school. No other behavior program being used at this school. All students and staff that were a part of the focus groups, answered honestly. All students and staff that were a part of the focus groups, answered honestly.  Limitations Subjectivity of perception and how it affects the validity of the data. Data collection from one school. Convenience sample of students and staff is utilized instead of random sample. Decision to focus on one variable affecting negative school behavior.

6 Method of Study  Collecting and analyzing data for this project began in Winter October 2012 – December 2012: Surveys were conducted with students, teachers, administrators and support staff. October 2012 – December 2012: Surveys were conducted with students, teachers, administrators and support staff. January 2013 – February 2013: Synthesis and triangulation of data, in conjunction with Genesee Intermediate School District. January 2013 – February 2013: Synthesis and triangulation of data, in conjunction with Genesee Intermediate School District. March 2013: Action research team compared data and crafted conclusions and recommendations. March 2013: Action research team compared data and crafted conclusions and recommendations.

7 Method of Study  Selection of Subjects Participants were selected using a sample of convenience. Participants were selected using a sample of convenience. Focus group included: Focus group included: 6 – 8 th graders that returned consent forms.6 – 8 th graders that returned consent forms. Surveys were distributed to: Surveys were distributed to: 30 male and 30 female middle school students30 male and 30 female middle school students 51 teachers51 teachers Principal and other support staffPrincipal and other support staff

8 Method of Study  Description of Instruments: Student Perception Survey Student Perception Survey Student Satisfaction Survey Student Satisfaction Survey Teacher Survey Teacher Survey Administrative/Support Staff Survey Administrative/Support Staff Survey Focus Groups Focus Groups

9 Method of Study  Analysis of Data Mean and Standard Deviation Mean and Standard Deviation ANOVA used in to disaggregate data ANOVA used in to disaggregate data Surveys had a Likert Scale Rating of 1-5 Surveys had a Likert Scale Rating of = Strongly Agree5 = Strongly Agree 1 = Strongly Disagree1 = Strongly Disagree Frequency tables based on demographics were generated for each survey. Frequency tables based on demographics were generated for each survey.

10 Results of the Study Administrator Surveys:  More development work needed within the PBIS program.  Questions regarding accuracy of program data.  Concerns regarding the consistency of the implementation of the PBIS program.

11 Results of the Study Teacher Survey:  Program promoted well within the school.  Program’s mission supported.  Program is supported within the classroom and incentives are provided.  PBIS program did not meet goal of reducing suspensions.  6 th grade teachers had a less positive perception of PBIS programs than 7 th and 8 th grade teachers. programs than 7 th and 8 th grade teachers.

12 Results of the Study Student Focus Group Results:  Positive perception of schools environment.  Negative perceptions focused on school rules, classroom behavior and treatment by certain teachers.  More opportunities needed for conflict resolution.

13 Results of Study Student Surveys New students feel less supported and are more negative about school environment New students feel less supported and are more negative about school environment Female students more likely to receive incentives than male students Female students more likely to receive incentives than male students White students more likely to receive incentives than non-white students White students more likely to receive incentives than non-white students All students knew how to earn and enjoyed the incentives All students knew how to earn and enjoyed the incentives

14 Conclusions  Students LIKE incentives  Significant difference in positive perception of PBIS between 6 th, 7 th and 8 th grade of PBIS between 6 th, 7 th and 8 th grade teachers. teachers.  Administrators are concerned with the fidelity of the program fidelity of the program.

15 Recommendations  Students need more education and experiences to fully understand PBIS  More student input and involvement in PBIS.  More clarity/education is needed for teacher and administrators regarding the implementation of PBIS.  More communication to provide continued development of PBIS.

16 Recommendations  Focus on gathering data from other schools  Determine what data to collect and how to use it  Concentration of study on effectiveness of PBIS with a small group of students with frequent referrals.

17 Questions??  Contact: Casey Wescott Casey Wescott Crystal Chapa Crystal Chapa


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