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UC Summer Institute June 2011 POSITIVE SCHOOL CLIMATE & POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORTS.

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Presentation on theme: "UC Summer Institute June 2011 POSITIVE SCHOOL CLIMATE & POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORTS."— Presentation transcript:

1 UC Summer Institute June 2011 POSITIVE SCHOOL CLIMATE & POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORTS

2 ACTIVITY Write specific examples of the following: A. Commitment to partnerships with families and the community to improve students’ academic and behavior achievement B. Practices address the needs of all learners, including children with disabilities and children identified as gifted and talented C.Learner supports are customized in ways to make content relevant and enable learning for language, culture, and other forms of student diversity D.Systems are in place for positive behavior support practices across tiers 2

3 Commitment to partnerships with families and the community to improve students’ academic and behavior achievement A. 3

4 The Importance and Impact of Engaging Families  Increased sense of community  Better attendance and homework completion  Fewer placements in special education  More positive attitudes and behavior  Higher graduation rates  Greater enrollment in postsecondary education  Higher expectations & achievement 4

5 Acknowledge & Respect Cultural Differences “Effective cross-cultural communication includes the willingness to engage in discussions that explore differences openly & respectfully, interactions that dispel myths and open doors to understanding.” Lynch & Hanson (1998) 5

6 Ways to Encourage & Support Family Involvement From The Comprehensive Evaluation for Family Engagement:  Does your school say welcome?  Is your school engaging for ALL families?  Is community outreach occurring? Constantino,

7 Examples include....  Collaborative decision making with diverse families by:  understanding how culture shapes values, beliefs, behaviors and communication  Cultural Reciprocity  Use of Cultural Brokers/interpreters  Gathering information from families in ways that are respectful of the family’s cultural beliefs and values  Adapting to family communication styles  Helping families learn about programs, organizations and systems with which they are interacting 7

8 Practices address the needs of all learners, including children with disabilities and children identified as gifted and talented B. 8

9 Examples include....  Explicit teaching (i.e. models skills and strategies, makes relationship overt)  Visual displays around the school reflect respect, equity, and diversity  Use of the students' native language and English for instruction  Cross-culturally competent/sensitive teaching (i.e. teachers familiar with beliefs, values, cultural practices, etc. that may impact behavior and academic success) 9

10 Examples include....  Build and use of vocabulary as a curricular anchor (e.g. teach difficult vocabulary prior to and during lesson, structure opportunities to speak English, etc.),  Diverse students' home culture and language incorporated in the school and lessons (e.g. multicultural curricular and social skills materials).  Using multimodal instruction (e.g. UDL, cooperative learning groups and peer- tutoring strategies, etc.). 10

11 Learner supports are customized in ways to make content relevant and enable learning for language, culture, and other forms of student diversity C. 11

12 Examples include....  Use school-wide indicators and/or other direct assessment to determine which students need OR no longer need additional instructional support for academic skills or behavior AND which research-based, ethnically valid intervention will be used  Use of the students' native language and English for supplemental instruction;  Small group explicit instruction for specific content reinforcement.  Peer tutoring (e.g., Peer Assisted Learning Strategies) and/or afterschool/volunteer tutoring program  Use of technology for English learning (e.g. computer programs, augmented communication devices)  ESL Summer school program 12

13 Systems are in place for positive behavior support practices across tiers D. 13

14  Student misbehavior can be changed.  Environments can be created to change behavior.  Changing environments requires change in adult behavior.  Adult behavior must change in a consistent and systematic manner.  Systems of support are necessary for both students and adults. GUIDING PRINCIPLES OF SWPBS 14

15  A framework for enhancing adoption & implementation of  A continuum of evidence-based interventions to achieve  Academically & behaviorally important outcomes for  All students! SCHOOL-WIDE PBS IS… 15

16 CORE COMPONENTS OF TIER 1: SCHOOL-WIDE 16

17 1.Clear Expectations 2.Comprehensive Instruction 3.Consistent Systems for Encouragement of Expectable Behavior & Correction of Behavior Errors 4.Community Connections 5.Computer Data System to Inform Decisions 6.Collaborative Leadership CORE COMPONENTS 17

18  3-5 overarching behavioral expectations  Agreed upon  Defined for all settings/locations  Clearly communicated  Overtly taught in all settings  Understood by all  Posted and distributed widely  Consistently demonstrated and implemented by all adults 1. CLEAR EXPECTATIONS 18

19 NON- ExampleExample 1. CLEAR EXPECTATIONS 19

20  Through Specifically Designed Lesson Plans  Instruction Provided To All Students  Kick-off – when initiating SWPBS Tier 1  Annual - initial days of school year  Booster sessions – as indicated by data  Instruction Provided in the Actual Settings  Keep School-wide Expectations Visible 2. COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTION 20

21 TEACHING BEHAVIORS NON-EXAMPLE  No elbowing others  No kicking  No hitting  No pinching  No shoving  No grabbing  Etc...  2+2 is not 1  2+2 is not 2  2+2 is not 3  2+2 is not 5  2+2 is not 6  2+2 is not 7  Etc... Playground Behavior: Be Respectful… Academic Skill: Addition 21

22  Hands and feet to self  Use kind words  2+2 = 4 Playground Behavior: Be Respectful… Academic Skill: Addition Teaching Behaviors Example 22

23 NON- ExampleExample 2. COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTION 23

24  Targeted for each and every student  Acknowledge immediately after expectable behavior occurs  Name the behavior and expectation observed  Give positive/verbal/social/token reinforcement: pair with natural/logical  Designed with input from stakeholder groups that reflect the diversity of the school community.  Ratio of positive to corrective feedback 5:1 3A. CONSISTENT ACKNOWLEDGMENT SYSTEM 24

25 IS …the presentation of something pleasant or rewarding immediately following a behavior. It makes that behavior more likely to occur in the future, and is one of the most powerful tools for shaping or changing behavior. IS NOT POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT… BRIBERY INCENTIVE 25

26 NON- ExampleExample 3A. CONSISTENT ACKNOWLEDGMENT SYSTEM 26

27  Include which problem behaviors will be class-managed and which will be office- managed  Timely corrective response to problem behavior  Link correction and re-teaching to:  School-wide expectations  System for teaching expectations  Acknowledgment system  The function of the misbehavior 3B. CONSISTENT CORRECTION SYSTEM 27

28  Establishing relationships with students  Learning about each student  Seeking input from parent/families in determining school-wide components and in Tier 3 intervention planning  Involving student/family stakeholders on school leadership team  Routinely examining disaggregated data to ensure cultural considerations/responsiveness in collaborative action planning 4. COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS 28

29 Critical System Components  Efficient data entry and report generation  Graphing capability:  Per day per month  Location  Time of Day  Problem behavior  Student  Ethnicity Essential Considerations 1.ODR Form includes: date, clock time, location & possible function 2.Coherent ODR Procedure 3.Data Entry Time Allocated 5. COMPUTER DATA SYSTEM 29

30  School Administrator is an active collaborative participant on the school leadership team: Beyond support, cooperation and communication Managing resources for effective, sustainable implementation  Team members share roles, responsibilities…and celebrations 6. COLLABORATIVE LEADERSHIP 30

31 TIER 2: TARGETED PBS 31

32  Similar components to academics:  Collaborative team that meets regularly  Decision rules for entering & exiting  Intervention “automatic” and components linked to school-wide system  Data for decision-making TARGETED TIER 2 PBS COMPONENTS 32

33 TIER 3: INTENSIVE PBS 33

34  Team formation includes parent/caregiver and those who best know the student  Team meets to develop plan within 2 weeks of student meeting Tier 3 criteria  Decision rules for entering & exiting  Intervention components:  Reflect cultural considerations  Informed by functional assessment data  Include elements of effective instruction  Link to School-wide Tier 1 supports  Extend or expand Tier 2 supports  Data for decision-making INTENSIVE TIER 3 PBS COMPONENTS 34

35 Quotes from Implementers : WITHOUT A STRONG TIER 1, YOU’LL JUST DRIVE YOURSELF CRAZY! I GET IT. YOU CAN’T FIX THE FISH UNTIL YOU CLEAN THE WATER! WE USED TO TALK ABOUT BEHAVIOR ALL THE TIME. NOW WE CAN TALK ABOUT SCIENCE !

36 INITIAL SWPBS IMPLEMENTATION STEPS  Form a representative building planning team, including an administrator, that meets regularly to determine action steps with problem definition, problem analysis and a goal statement based on data collected and reviewed.  The building planning team integrates PBS action plan steps with other building initiatives/goals.  Plan for ongoing staff development and stakeholder two-way communication.  Develop and define school-wide expectations with involvement of all stakeholders: students, families, cafeteria personnel, bus drivers… 36

37 INITIAL STEPS…CONTINUED  Determine settings and develop rules that match expectations for each setting.  Develop setting lesson plans.  Develop proactive systems of encouragement and correction and materials for implementation.  Develop procedures for office discipline referrals and forms.  Develop schedule of school-wide instruction.  Develop setting specific posters of expectations.  Team regularly examines disaggregated data to inform action planning. 37

38 Q&A BEFORE ASSESSING TEAM IMPLEMENTATION 38

39 HAPPY MTSS IMPLEMENTATION! MARIE KOBAYASHI KAREN STINE 39


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