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“Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?” Strategies for Making the Transition from On-Ground to Online Teaching Daniel Facchinetti & Kaitlin Walsh CTDLC.

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Presentation on theme: "“Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?” Strategies for Making the Transition from On-Ground to Online Teaching Daniel Facchinetti & Kaitlin Walsh CTDLC."— Presentation transcript:

1 “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?” Strategies for Making the Transition from On-Ground to Online Teaching Daniel Facchinetti & Kaitlin Walsh CTDLC E3 Conference May 28, 2014

2 Who Are You?  Faculty, Staff, Admin, Other?  Taught online before?  Developed an online course? 2

3 About Charter Oak  Connecticut’s public online college  2592 students enrolled in courses (2012-13)  2325 students enrolled at COSC (FA 13) over 80% PT  73% Connecticut Residents  66% Female  Average age 38  600 degrees awarded (2012-13) 3

4 COSC Instructional Design 4 Academic Dean Instructional Designer Course Developer Instructional Designer ID Associate Student Worker

5 Our Course Development Process 5 SME hired SME drafts proposal & orders texts Proposal sent to peer reviewer When approved, SME gets 1 st payment SME maps out course using templates SME delivers material to ID ID builds course in Bb Registrar adds course to catalog SME signs off, gets 2 nd payment

6 Guiding Faculty What sort of guidance do faculty need to envision a full- semester’s worth of course content before actually teaching a course? Many faculty work on their courses throughout a semester. We encourage faculty to plan out the entire course prior to the beginning of a term. Our course development methodology is built around that. Trying to maintain a consistent look and feel. Consistency matters for students with disabilities Reducing student anxiety 6

7 ADDIE Model  Analysis  Design  Development  Implementation  Evaluation 7

8 Analysis  Planning an online course involves identifying goals of the course (student learning outcomes) and analyzing how to realistically achieve those goals.  Learning objectives have three parts: Performance Conditions Criterion 8

9 Course Proposal  Addresses analysis, design, and some development  Faculty developer (SME) proposes course within a template  Proposal sent out for peer review 9

10 Setting Objectives Early On 10

11 11

12 Design & Development 12

13 Considering Instructional Methods 13

14 Developing Instructional Methods 14

15 Aligning Instructional Methods 15

16 Implementation 16

17 17 Implementation

18 18

19 Evaluation  Student Evaluations  Faculty/peer review evaluations 19

20 Lost in Translation? 20 How do we translate traditional teaching methods such as lectures, discussions or other forms of in-class participation? Making the move to “facilitator” or “curator”

21 ENG 302 – World Lit for Children 21

22 SOC 315 – Sociology of Diversity 22

23 MGT 360 – Small Business Mgmt. 23

24 POL 150 – American Government 24

25 HIS 101 – US History 1 “The Jamestown settlement was a fiasco!” Agree? Disagree? 25

26 Why do this?  More chances to be creative & active in the course.  Not necessarily a direct translation from on-ground to online, but on-ground methods can serve as a compass to launch online discussions and activities. 26

27 27 Discussions How do in-class discussions translate into structured online discussion forums? Do in-class discussions privilege the spontaneous production of ideas? Or do online discussion forums preclude spontaneity?

28 Web Conferences & Engagement Using WebEX for:  Office hours  Public speaking projects  Group and team assignments  Instructors provide guidance on final projects (i.e., the CPS) 28

29 Attendance and Participation 29 What is “classroom time” when an instructor doesn’t have a classroom? What we talk about when we talk about “participation”

30 One instructor’s perspective  “…we want some degree of casual or even unfounded opinions in the discussions, or they will just dry up.”  “The research is clear that students want and need to learn from each other, and too ‘heavy’ an instructor presence leads to face-classroom type online classrooms, with the professor downloading all wisdom and the student being passive and quiet – this isn’t what we need or want. … we need to be there but not in a dominating role.” 30

31 The Official Definition  “Academic attendance”  “attendance at an academically-related activity” Physically attending a class Submitting an assignment Taking an exam, tutorial, computer-assisted instruction Attending a study group Participating in a discussion Initiating contact with the instructor  Charter Oak’s policy – 2 graded assignments per week 31

32 Benefits of Asynchronous Learning 32 Does an asynchronous learning environment benefit certain types of students or learning styles more than others?  Knowles’ six principles: Adults are internally motivated and self-directed Adults bring life experiences & knowledge to learning experience Adults are goal-oriented Adults are relevancy oriented Adults are practical Adults like to be respected

33 Thank You!  Daniel Facchinetti - dfacchinetti@charteroak.edudfacchinetti@charteroak.edu  Dr. Kaitlin Walsh – kwalsh2@charteroak.edukwalsh2@charteroak.edu 33


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