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Making Food Safe and Available Everywhere Public Private Partnerships Ulla Holm, Global Director Tetra Laval Food for Development Office - Save Food Congress.

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Presentation on theme: "Making Food Safe and Available Everywhere Public Private Partnerships Ulla Holm, Global Director Tetra Laval Food for Development Office - Save Food Congress."— Presentation transcript:

1 Making Food Safe and Available Everywhere Public Private Partnerships Ulla Holm, Global Director Tetra Laval Food for Development Office - Save Food Congress

2 Nutrition and Health - the No 1 priority for sustainable development  842 million people in the world do not have enough to eat.  Poor nutrition causes nearly half (45%) of deaths in children under five million children each year.  One out of six children - roughly 100 million - in developing countries is underweight.  One in four of the world's children are stunted. 80 % of the world's stunted children live in only 20 countries.  66 million primary school-age children attend classes hungry across the developing world. The UN Millenium Development Goals

3 FAO on Multiple benefits of Dairy Farming: Global Focus on Food Security and Nutrition Nearly one billion people live on dairy farms, smallholdings or in landless households keeping one or more animals Nutrition Women empoverment Income and Jobs Asset creation and social standing Demand for school feeding is increasing as a safety net School feeding linked to local food production and food processing – a win-win solution For every $1 spent by governments and donors, $3-8 is gained in economic returns WFP and World Bank Messages:

4 Why Milk?  Milk is a complete food product.  Contains 18 of 22 minerals & vitamins humans need, for example - Calcium for bones and teeth - Protein builds and repairs muscle tissue - Vitamin A for vision and skin, cell growth and the immune system - Vitamin D for absorption of calcium  Aids cognitive and physical development.  Reduces the risk of various medical disorders.  Good base for fortification if required.  Encourages healthy eating.

5 The Tetra Pak Tradition - a commitment to sustainable development  The aseptic package developed by Tetra Pak in the 1960-is opened up new ways to preserve milk in developing countries  To help customers in developing countries build a sustainable dairy industry, it was important to support the whole milk value chain  School Milk Programmes create demand for locally produced and processed quality milk and improve children’s health and learning capacities  For more that 50 years Tetra Pak has helped governments to implement School Milk Programmes

6 Food for Development Office - set up in 2000  Knowledge Center  School Feeding Programmes  Highly Fortified Drinks for Nutrition Programmes  Agricultural & Dairy Development Programmes  Global Partnerships Development

7 Integration via Public Private Partnership - a value chain approach to sustainable solutions Dairy Farms ► Support for training of farmers Support for training of farmers ► Equipment financing Equipment financing ► Dairy Hubs Dairy Hubs Dairy Plant ► Commercial financing of processing plants Commercial financing of processing plants ► Management support and training Management support and training Distributors ► Support for market development Support for market development Consumer School Feeding ► Support for feeding programmes Support for feeding programmes ► Consumer information Consumer information

8  Number of children 64 million - of which developing countries 43 million  Number of countries 63 countries  Number of packages million - of which developing countries5 098 million  Majority of programmes based on government funding The Tetra Pak Tradition - school feeding in Tetra Pak packages in 2013

9 Examples of School Milk Programmes Kenya ► Ran between 1979 – 1998 with Government funding Ran between 1979 – 1998 with Government funding ► Covered 4,3 mio children Covered 4,3 mio children ► Created milk drinking generation and a developed dairy industry Created milk drinking generation and a developed dairy industry ► Parent-paid programme introduced in 2008 Parent-paid programme introduced in 2008 China ► Covers 13,7 million children (2013) Covers 13,7 million children (2013) ► More than 2 billion packages delivered to schools in 2012 More than 2 billion packages delivered to schools in 2012 ► School milk the driver for dairy development School milk the driver for dairy development ► Started as parent paid program, now government funded Started as parent paid program, now government funded Thailand ► Covers 7 million children (2013) Covers 7 million children (2013) ► Grew milk consumption 2 – 28 l/capita (1988 – 2007) Grew milk consumption 2 – 28 l/capita (1988 – 2007) ► jobs created jobs created ► Reduced malnutrition Reduced malnutrition ► Government funded Government funded

10 The Dairy Hub Model - a response to food crises in 2008  A large portion of locally produded milk in developing countries is never collected and processed.  Dairy processors are often dependent on importation of milk powder.  During food crises prices of milk powder more than doubled.  The Dairy Hub model builds on the one herd concept and links dedicated dairy processors to small holder milk farmers.  Training and education and a consistent link to market help milk farmers move from subsistance farming to driving dairy as a business.  Dairy Hubs develop local food reservs and replace imports.

11 Development of local milk production - growing a local food reserve  With sister company DeLaval we have expertise to develop the whole milk value chain  Support small holder milk farmers to: 1. increase quantity of locally produced milk 2. improve quality of locally produced milk  Integrated Dairy Value Chain projects (Dairy Hubs)

12 The Dairy Hub Model - links small holder farmers to dedicated dairy processors ► Training ► Feeding ► Services ► Financing ► Mechanization ► Access to market Builds on the One Herd Concept

13 PRAN in Bangladesh - a success case  Cooperation between PRAN and Food for Development Office was initiated in  First Dairy Hub was set up in  Milk Collection at first Dairy Hub started in October from liters to litres/months in 6 months.  more dairy hub started  Expansion plans – partnership with UNIDO and Sida to establish 3 new Dairy Hubs by 2016.

14 The Chatmohar Dairy Hub in Bangladesh - achievements from the start until December 2013 (39 months) Average milk yield/cow/day: from 4,75 liter to 8,5 liter Average milk yield/cow/day: from 4,75 liter to 8,5 liter Milk collection/day: from litres to litres Milk collection/day: from litres to litres Average income/small holder farmer: from USD 100 to USD 223 / month for 1766 farmers Comparison between starting date Oct 2010 and average results for % +1275% +120%

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16 The Power of Partnerships - making a difference with others  Customers In more than 170 countries  Governments Partnerships in school feeding and agricultural development programmes  International Development Agencies Co-funds nutrition programmes and dairy development (Sida, GiZ)  UN Agencies Partnership with WFP (School milk), UNIDO (Value chain Development), UNICEF (Nutrition), IFAD (Agricultural development), INCAP (Nutrition)  World Bank / Development Banks The WB fast Track Initiative, IDB (Interamerican development bank)  Others GCNF – Global Child Nutrition Foundation GAIN – Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition  DSM – Supplier of vitamins and minerals

17 Milk and Dairy Industry Development - Huge potential to drive evolution from subsistence small holder milk production to small-scale commercial dairy farming - Opportunity to reduce food losses and develop a nutritious food reserve - Development of small holder production creates on-farm employment and income opportunities beyond farm gate. Ex: Ghana (FAO): one full-time job created for every 20 liters of milk collected, processed and marketed. Growing demand assures sustainable economic and social development - School milk programmes grow demand for locally produced and processed quality milk, in parallel with improving health and learning capacities of school children Public Private Partnerships - With technical assistance and co-funding we can replicate successful models! Protect what’s good

18 Thank you for your attention !

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