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Forces & Motion Applied Physics and Chemistry Force Lecture 1 www.hse.k12.in.us/staff/tjohnson.

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Presentation on theme: "Forces & Motion Applied Physics and Chemistry Force Lecture 1 www.hse.k12.in.us/staff/tjohnson."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Forces & Motion Applied Physics and Chemistry Force Lecture 1

3 Force Force Force a push or pull that one body exerts on another a push or pull that one body exerts on another What forces are being exerted on the football? What forces are being exerted on the football? F kick F grav

4 Force Force is a vector Force is a vector We need to know magnitude AND direction We need to know magnitude AND direction Two categories of force Two categories of force Contact forces Contact forces Field forces Field forces

5 Measuring Forces Forces are measured in newtons Forces are measured in newtons (kg. m/s 2 ). Forces can be measured using a spring scale. Forces can be measured using a spring scale.

6 Force Balanced Forces Balanced Forces forces acting on an object that are opposite in direction and equal in size no change in velocity equilibrium

7 Force Net Force Net Force Sum of all the forces on an object Sum of all the forces on an object If forces are unbalanced (not opposite and equal) velocity changes (object accelerates) If forces are unbalanced (not opposite and equal) velocity changes (object accelerates) If forces are balanced, velocity does not change If forces are balanced, velocity does not change F friction W F pull F net NN

8 ConcepTest 1 TRUE or FALSE? The object shown in the diagram must be at rest since there is no net force acting on it. FALSE! A net force does not cause motion. A net force causes a change in motion, or acceleration. Taken from The Physics Classroom © Tom Henderson, The Physics Classroom

9 ConcepTest 2 You are a passenger in a car and not wearing your seat belt. Without increasing or decreasing its speed, the car makes a sharp left turn, and you find yourself colliding with the right-hand door. Which is the correct analysis of the situation?...

10 ConcepTest 2 1. Before and after the collision, there is a rightward force pushing you into the door. 2. Starting at the time of collision, the door exerts a leftward force on you. 3. both of the above 4. neither of the above 2. Starting at the time of collision, the door exerts a leftward force on you.

11 Newtons First Law Newtons First Law of Motion Newtons First Law of Motion An object at rest will remain at rest and an object in motion will continue moving at a constant velocity unless acted upon by a net force. An object at rest will remain at rest and an object in motion will continue moving at a constant velocity unless acted upon by a net force.

12 Newtons First Law Newtons First Law of Motion Newtons First Law of Motion Law of Inertia Law of Inertia Inertia Inertia tendency of an object to resist any change in its motion tendency of an object to resist any change in its motion increases as mass increases increases as mass increases


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