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Why a Question is Not Always a Question. Ask NO questions and we get no information.

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Presentation on theme: "Why a Question is Not Always a Question. Ask NO questions and we get no information."— Presentation transcript:

1 Why a Question is Not Always a Question

2 Ask NO questions and we get no information.

3 Ask NO questions and we get no information.

4 Ask an improper question and we get MEANINGLESS information.

5 Lawyer: Doctor, before you performed the autopsy, did you check for a pulse? Witness: No. Lawyer: Did you check for blood pressure? Witness: No. Lawyer: Did you check for breathing? Witness: No. Lawyer: So, then it is possible that the patient was alive when you began the autopsy? Witness: No. Lawyer: How can you be so sure, Doctor?

6 Witness: Because his brain was sitting on my desk in a jar. Lawyer: But could the patient have still been alive nevertheless? Witness: It is possible that he could have been alive and practicing law somewhere

7 Which is worse?

8 Ask a questions that is a bad question and we get answers that look correct, but which are meaningless information. This is a very dangerous situation.

9 Five Bad Questions (from the Internet) There are five things that women should never, ever ask a guy, according to an article in an issue of Sassy magazine.

10 The five questions are: 1 - "What are you thinking?"

11 The five questions are: 1 - "What are you thinking?" 2 - "Do you love me?"

12 The five questions are: 1 - "What are you thinking?" 2 - "Do you love me?" 3 - "Do I look fat?"

13 The five questions are: 1 - "What are you thinking?" 2 - "Do you love me?" 3 - "Do I look fat?" 4 - "Do you think she is prettier than me?“

14 The five questions are: 1 - "What are you thinking?" 2 - "Do you love me?" 3 - "Do I look fat?" 4 - "Do you think she is prettier than me?" 5 - "What would you do if I died?"

15 Leading Questions: A “leading” question is one that leads to a certain answer….

16 on.html

17 Leading Questions: 1. Presupposition “What is your opinion of the disastrous national debt?” Or: “What is your opinion of the national debt?”

18 Leading Questions: 1. Presupposition “Do you believe this popular product is better than the competition?”

19 Leading Questions: 1. Presupposition 2. One-sided “Should more government money be spent on schools?” Compared to what?

20 Leading Questions: 1. Presupposition 2. One-sided 3. Social desirable “Right think” “Right think in… right think out!”

21 Leading Questions: 1. Presupposition 2. One-sided 3. Social desirable 4. Ambiguous

22 Leading Questions: 1. Presupposition 2. One-sided 3. Social desirable 4. Ambiguous 5.Double bind “Have you stopped beating you wife yet?” Yes or No.

23 Leading Questions: What to avoid:

24 Leading Questions: What to avoid: 1. Ambiguity Be precise and use precise words: Avoid words such as: “like” “you” “all” “good” “bad” “where”

25 Leading Questions: What to avoid: 1. Ambiguity 2. Leading questions

26 Leading Questions: What to avoid: 1. Ambiguity 2. Leading questions 3. Implied assumptions

27 Leading Questions: What to avoid: 1. Ambiguity 2. Leading questions 3. Implicit assumptions 4. Implicit alternatives a. Alternatives not expressed:

28 Leading Questions: What to avoid: 1. Ambiguity 2. Leading questions 3. Implicit assumptions 4. Implicit alternatives a. Alternatives not expressed: b. Better: Alternative suggested by IF or THEN “Would you buy a fuel cell so you could be independent of a utility company?”

29 Leading Questions: What to avoid: 1. Ambiguity 2. Leading questions 3. Implicit assumptions 4. Implicit alternatives a. Alternatives not expressed: b. Better: Alternative suggested by IF or Then “Would you buy a fuel cell so you could be independent of a utility company if it cost 10% more than you current payments?”

30 Leading Questions: What to avoid: 1. Ambiguity 2. Leading questions 3. Implicit assumptions 4. Implicit alternatives 5. Generalizations and estimates If a question becomes too generalized it may lose its meaning… and/or people will just guess.

31 Leading Questions: What to avoid: 1. Ambiguity 2. Leading questions 3. Implicit assumptions 4. Implicit alternatives 5. Generalizations and estimates 6. Double-Barreled questions Questions connected with “and,” and “or”… Which question is being answered??

32 Leading Questions: What to avoid: Double-Barreled questions Questions connected with “and,” and “or” Which question is being answered?? “ Should our store give out more prizes, and have more contests?”

33 Mary Michaud


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