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A Social Action Project Diane Heyward, Camellia Redway Ginger Tillman, Melanie Vitelli.

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Presentation on theme: "A Social Action Project Diane Heyward, Camellia Redway Ginger Tillman, Melanie Vitelli."— Presentation transcript:

1 A Social Action Project Diane Heyward, Camellia Redway Ginger Tillman, Melanie Vitelli

2  Part I  Social Action Problem Defined Problem In terms of Human Needs  Relation of problem to social justice as struggle Crucial notions of human rights Provisos considered  History of the problem How society has dealt with the problem How has public discourse defined the problem  Article II of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights Demographics of the problem  Part II  Crucial Notions of Human Rights in other instruments that Relate to The Problem Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD) Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women  Dealing with the problem from an Advanced Generalist Perspective Meta-macro (global) Macro (whole population) Mezzo (at-risk) Micro (clinical) Meta-micro (everyday life)  Part III  Discussion on how quantitative & qualitative research assisted in our interventions Quantitative Methods Qualitative Methods Literature Reviewed  Relevant Ground Rules  Select Social Actions in the political arena that can affect change

3  Part IV  Group Perspective Conflicting Values Constraints Ethical Issues Writing a Grant Available & Accessible Services Using Technology  Relevant Policy Initiatives local, state, national, and international levels  Constructed Persuasive Argument  Specific Recommendations to Deal with the Problem  Additional Social Action Strategies Advocated by other Authors  What Have We Done to Ameliorate the Problem  Working as Group Successes & Failures Peer Feedback Constructive Comments Creative Dialogue Soul Searching Obstacles Remaining Complacent

4 Part I

5  Defined  United Nations General Assembly stated: “any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual, mental harm suffering to women threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or in private life”, (Fox 2002).  In Terms of Human Needs  United Nation Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women (1993) stated: “violence against women is a manifestation of historically unequal power relations between men and women”

6  Women age  Native American are twice as likely to be victims of violent act  African American women are more likely than there white counter parts to be impacted by domestic violence in their homes  Children that witness violence are more susceptible to mimic these behaviors as adult and are twice as likely to become victims of abuse or neglect as children.

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8  Murder-defined as the crime of unlawfully killing a person especially with malice aforethought  Domestic violence-defined as a pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over an intimate partner.  Sexual assault- illegal sexual contact that usually involves force upon a person without consent or is inflicted upon a person who is incapable of giving consent.

9  Crucial notions of human rights  There are five important notions of the Declaration of Human Rights that all governments should abide by: Human dignity Nondiscrimination Civil and political freedom Economic, social and cultural rights Rights to solidarity. The Crucial Notion identified for In eliminating violence against women is: nondiscrimination Article 2: “Nondiscrimination is based on race, color, sex, language, religion, political opinion, national or social origin, property, birth, or other status”

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11  Provisos considered India vs United States India: Under tremendous domestic pressure from frustrated women, is moving toward making important changes in its rape laws. United States: Rape is still wildly under- reported, under punished and is no longer the stigma of violence against women.

12 How society has dealt w/ the problem  In 1867, wife abuse was part of English Common Law and stated that it was completely acceptable for a man to beat his wife.  Fox (2002) describes violence against women being influenced by western society’s views and treatment of women, including: Judeo-Christian cultural beliefs, Greek philosophy and the western legal code.  It wasn’t until 1871 where policies and laws began to change beginning the long history leading to the Violence Against Women Act.  In 1990 U.S Senator Biden introduces the first Violence Against Women Act, which sparks the three-year investigation into the causes and effects of violence against women by the Senator and staff of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

13 How public discourse has defined the problem  The article, Dangerous Gun Myths turns the debate to reduce gun violence into “some sort of sexist plot that would disproportionately hurt vulnerable women and their children” (New York Times, 2013).  According to a study done in 1990, results concluded that weapons fired in the home were primarily the cause of an accident, criminal assault, homicide and suicide attempts rather than self-defense.  “In domestic violence situations, the risk of homicide for women increased eightfold when the abuser had access to firearms, according to a study published in The American Journal of Public Health in 2003” (New York Times, 2013).  With regard to children’s safety, guns in the home cause a greater increase in the risk of youth suicides.

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15 Areas of Discrimination: Sex Religion Medical Condition Marital Status Sexual Orientation

16  Article II of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states: “Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status” (Wronka, 2008, p.282)

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18  Every 9 seconds in the US a woman is assaulted or beaten  1 in every 3 women has been beaten, coerced into sex or abused during her lifetime with the abuser being a family member  The leading cause of injury to women—more than car accidents, muggings, and rapes combined  Between 55 percent and 95 percent of women who have been physically abused by their partners have never contacted non-governmental organizations, shelters, or the police for help (Domestic Violence Statistics, 2013)

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20  Acid Burning:  a woman who turns down a suitor or does not get along with her in-laws can become a victim of a violent form of revenge: acid burning,  This extreme form of violence can often blind and/or cause third degree burns on the body.  Dowery Deaths:  Brides unable to pay the high "price" to marry are punished by violence and often death at the hands of their in-laws or their own husbands  In India, it is estimated that more than 5,000 women are killed each year because their in-laws consider their dowries inadequate  A tiny percentage of their murderers are brought to justice (V-Day, 2012).

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22  There are more than 5,000 "honour killings" worldwide each year  The National Commission for Women in India investigates possible cases a month (Arjunpuri, 2012)  Women in these countries who are a victim of rape and can’t provide proof can experience death by being stoned, beaten or beheaded  Assuming an accused woman's guilt, male family members believe that they have no other means of undoing a perceived infringement of "honor" other than to kill the woman” (Amnesty International USA, 2005).

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25  In its most severe form, a woman or girl has all of her genitalia removed and then stitched together, leaving a small opening for intercourse and menstruation  It is practiced in 28 African countries on the pretext of cultural tradition or hygiene  An estimated 135 million girls have undergone FGM with dire consequences ranging from infection (including HIV) to sterility, in addition to the devastating psychological effects (Amnesty International USA, 2005).

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27 Part II

28  Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW)  Adopted in 1979 by the United Nation’s General Assembly  Can be viewed around the world as the international bill of rights for all women  Points out the need to end discrimination against women and provides a national agenda for doing so  Additional Instruments used that relate to the problem include:  Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD)  The United Nations Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women

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30 Meta-macro (global) Macro (whole population) Mezzo (at-risk) Micro (clinical) Meta-micro (everyday life)

31 Dealing with the problem from an Advanced Generalist Perspective  Write letters to the politicians  Form rallies  Organize information sessions  Education throughout communities

32 Dealing with the problem from an Advanced Generalist Perspective  Eliminate acts of violence against all  Change Attitude  Expansion of VAWA  Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act

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34 Dealing with the problem from an Advanced Generalist Perspective Target population: women who have experienced violence (support group)  Meet in a safe space  Identifying coping skills in dealing with violent acts  Build healthy relationship with peers and others  Develop safety plans  Provide women with community resources, such as: life skills and job readiness Article 23 of the Universal Declaration states: “Everyone has the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interest”

35 Dealing with the problem from an Advanced Generalist Perspective  Individual counseling  Specific to treatment needs  Learning to utilize coping strategies to manage feelings and emotions in an appropriate way.  Group counseling  Women can share experiences and offer support to one another.  Groups can focus on different forms of violence towards women.

36 Dealing with the problem from an Advanced Generalist Perspective Small acts of kindness seen in everyday life interactions between individuals. Helping women identify and connect with supports of family and friends in order to help them realize that there are people that care. Assist with providing resources for basic needs of shelter, food, childcare or assistance with finances. Revealing the strengths in women who have experienced violence in their lives can leave a tremendous impact and help to improve their self-esteem. A simple smile or “how are you today?” can make a difference in the day of a woman who is accustomed to violent acts or behaviors happening around her.

37 Part III

38 Quantitative Methods  2 Million women experience rape, stalking and/or physical assault by a current or former partner  Between 15 and 76 percent of women are targeted for physical and/or sexual violence in their lifetime  Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) 9 to 70 percent of women reporting their husband or partners as the perpetrator  On average, two women are murdered each day  Estimated 100 to 140 million girls and women in the world have experienced female genital mutilation  Annually there are about 800,000 people trafficked across national borders and 80 percent are women and 79 percent are trafficked for sexual exploitation.  United States reported 83 percent of girl’s ages are harassed in public schools Qualitative Methods Six interviews were conducted with women of various ethnic backgrounds and occupations. Out of the six women interviewed, four experienced some form of violence and two did not. Co-researchers shared common thoughts when thinking about what violence against women means to them. Three women were involved in abusive relationships and one woman was a survivor of sexual assault.

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40  Ground Rules:  Incorporating the Voice of the oppressed  Values  Ambiguity  A spirit of compassion  Nonviolence  Never giving up  Recognizing others humanity  Remembering to smile  Playful attitude  Making your own ground rules

41 o Universal Declaration o Articles 1 & 3 o Social Action Model o Social Worker Code of Ethics o Lobbyist/Politian's o Methods for Lobbying

42 Part IV

43 Conflicting Values Constraints Ethical Issues Writing a Grant Available & Accessible Services Using Technology

44 Conflicting Values  The article, Dangerous Gun Myths turns the debate to reduce gun violence into “some sort of sexist plot that would disproportionately hurt vulnerable women and their children” (New York Times, 2013).  “The witness was Gayle Trotter, a fellow at the Independent Women’s Forum, a right-wing public policy group that provides pseudofeminist support for extreme positions that are in fact dangerous to women” (New York Times, 2013).  Ms. Trotter expresses her opposition to gun control laws and has vocalized her opposing feelings of the Violence Against Women Act.  Promoting women to have guns can be seen as contributing towards an act of violence rather than a way of eliminating it. Constraints  One major constraint in trying to improve violence against women is, “sexual violence, particularly rape, is often used as a weapon of war to destabilize families, groups and communities; to carry out ethical cleansing and genocide; to instill fear in populations in order to dampen resistance and/or incite flight; as a form of punishment and torture; and to affirm aggression” (GSDRC, 2013).  Why is the U.S one of the seven countries that haven’t ratified CEDAW especially considering that fact that the U.S was a major player in drafting the treaty?  “Something is wrong with our system, and we all need to get involved in the conversation, so that functional solutions can be found. Did you know that a person convicted of selling drugs could get more jail time than someone convicted of violently raping a woman? Like I said -- something is wrong” (Saban, 2013).

45  In order for co-researchers to participate in the project an ethics consent form must be signed.  Although the ethics consent for is designed to protect the co-researcher, one might feel bound to this consent causing them to not want to participate.

46  One of the key points to successful grant writing is to make the funder feel like they are family. By developing relationships with the grant funder, the problem is taken more seriously and is more carefully considered when exploring ways to resolve it.  A possible way of gaining grant funding could be hosting an event where women who have experienced violence can share their stories for funders to hear. Funders may be more apt to provide grant funding when they can relate to personal experiences of individuals causing feelings of empathy and sympathy.  The basic format for grant writing includes: face sheet, cover page, agency capability statement, goals and objectives, intervention, administration and staffing, evaluation, timeframe, a budget, dissemination of information and an appendix (Wronka, 2008).

47 local, state, national, and international levels UN Secretary –General demonstrate public support Global level (UNITE Campaign) CT Family Violence Law CT Domestic Violence ACT Tracy Thurman/Donna Palomba

48 The Human Declaration of Human Rights Articles 1 – 5: Everyone is born equal and free, Everyone has rights regardless of their sex, race, color, language and religious beliefs. Everyone has the right to liberty, life and security of persons. No one should be held in slavery, tortured or punished Equity, liberty and security are essential in the fight to eliminate violence against women. Humans require community, solidarity, a sense of belonging; dignity and respect, self-esteem, and honor; friendship and love.

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50  To reinforce inducements or introduce incentives. “The idea behind inducements is that knowledge of a threatened penalty or a promised reward motivates people to act differently than they might otherwise choose. Incentives and deterrence are flip sides of this same coin” (Stone, 2002, p. 265).  To implement rules to change behavior of violence against women. “They command people, organizations, and governments to act in certain ways” (Stone, 2002, p. 284).  Facts  Persuasion – rational persuasion and voluntary behavior change; information and knowledge can be used to resolve conflict.  Propaganda and indoctrination – intentionally manipulative, disguising the hidden motives of the perpetrator.  Rights help govern relationships and organize individual behavior to achieve a common goal. “Rights partake something of rules and sanctions, but as a policy strategy, rights are a more diffuse method of articulating standards of behavior in an ongoing system of conflict resolution” (Stone, 2002, p. 325).  Power – Decision making process that may involve a restructure of authority in order to solve problems.

51 Martin Luther King Jr. was a man in his own right that stood up for the equality of all people regardless of sex, color and religious background. Jane Addams was first president of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF): promote full rights for women, racial and economic justice, an end to all forms of violence, and to establish those political, social, and psychological conditions which can assure peace, freedom, and justice for all. Dr. Joseph Wronka is an ambassador for human rights. He believes in social justice for all people, especially women. He also talks about the importance to addressing social problems on a micro, mezzo and macro level.

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53  Meta-macro level:  Writing a letters to the President & First Lady Barack Obama & secretary of the state John Kerry as well as the representative of the United Nations, Susan Rice  Additional letters to the Women’s Health Organization (WHO) and the National Organization of Women (NOW)  All letters placed an urgency to ending violence against women around the world  Macro level:  Writing letters to the Governor of Connecticut Dennel Malloy as well as to the cities were we each reside within Connecticut that included New Haven, Waterbury and West Haven.  Social media networking: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin & Pinterest Each social media account can be accessed via computer or smart (cell) phone

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55  Mezzo level:  Opportunity to work with local agencies in New Haven and Waterbury, Connecticut R Kids CT Counseling Center Family Centered Services of CT Through professional networks one group member was able to complete our qualitative portion of our assignment through her place of employment at the Family Centered Services of CT 6 questionnaires were completed through her domestic violence outreach group  Micro level:  An optional domestic violence questionnaire that was distributed to individual females receiving services at Family Centered Services of CT  As a result of it being viewed in a positive light by clients, staff and administration, the questionnaire will serve as the basis for a future questionnaire that will be added to the agency’s intake  Meta-Micro level:  As individuals and as a group as we moved through our project we generated meta-micro level strategies through moving in our everyday lives

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57 Successes & Failures Peer Feedback Constructive Comments Creative Dialogue Soul Searching Obstacles Remaining Complacent

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