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In Education for the Nanoscale, students need to learn to work on the nanometer scale. This opens completely new dimensions on how we will approach and.

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Presentation on theme: "In Education for the Nanoscale, students need to learn to work on the nanometer scale. This opens completely new dimensions on how we will approach and."— Presentation transcript:

1 In Education for the Nanoscale, students need to learn to work on the nanometer scale. This opens completely new dimensions on how we will approach and solve many problems of the future as we enter the Nanometer Age.” -Heinrich Rohreer, Nobel Laureate By Jeannie Nye and Andrew Greenberg Lake Mills Middle School And University of Wisconsin-Madison

2 In 1959… “Up to now we have been content to dig in the ground to find minerals, …ultimately in the great future we can arrange the atoms the way we want.” -Richard P. Feynman, the man who dared to think small, 1959 “Up to now we have been content to dig in the ground to find minerals, …ultimately in the great future we can arrange the atoms the way we want.” -Richard P. Feynman, the man who dared to think small, 1959

3 The Future is Now! Now we have new imaging and manipulation tools available to help us gather data about nanosized materials.

4 How Big is Nano? The Basics: There are one million micrometers in a meter. There are 1000 nanometers in 1 micrometer. The Basics: There are one million micrometers in a meter. There are 1000 nanometers in 1 micrometer. These prefixes can be confusing! On the next few slides we’ll investigate what they mean. These prefixes can be confusing! On the next few slides we’ll investigate what they mean.

5 SI Prefixes FactorPower of ten PrefixSymbolExample teraTterahertz gigaGgigabyte megaMmegabyte kilokkilogram hectohhectometer dekadadekagram deciddeciliter centiccentimeter millimmilliliter micro  micrometer nanonnanometer picoppicogram femtoffemtosecond attoaattomole

6 How Small is Small? How many suns could fit inside Surius, …Pollux, …Arcturus?

7 And Smaller? View size comparisons is at Click on “Learn More: Powers of Ten” in the top left hand corner of the page. How many earths could fit inside Jupiter, …Neptune, …the sun?

8 Small is Small! Follow this link for a great visual illustration of size: A related activity can be found at Comparing one hundred nanometers to the size of a soccerball is like comparing a soccerball to the size of the earth!

9 Quiz Time Test your knowledge of scale at nickelodeon.html nickelodeon.html

10 Click on and play Duckboy in Nanoland to better understand how things operate at the nanoscale. Try Living in a Nanoworld! Click for more information on how the nanoworld operates.

11 Mimi Me or Dr. Evil What’s the Difference? Imagine that you traveled along with Alice to Wonderland and, ‘poof’, you doubled in height. Cool, right? You could outrun your peers, drop basketballs into baskets with ease, stride past your competitors on the field and, wow, what a golf swing! pound man Man becomes 4 times taller, wider, longer. (LxWxH) Man now weighs 6400 pounds. (100 poundsx4x4x4) So, is that a problem? Nope, you’re better off the size you are. The problem is surface area/volume ratio. If your height doubles and your proportions stay the same, your volume and mass octuple! (Since volume is length times width times height, you’ve doubled them all, not just your height. Thus your volume is now 2X2X2=8 times greater. Your weight and mass are also eight times greater!)

12 So? For example, a fly can stick to a wall because his feet are just the right size to provide enough adhesive force between the wall and the surface area on his feet to hold up the fly’s small mass. If the fly were bigger, there wouldn’t be enough surface area on its foot to hold up its greatly increased mass. At 6400 pounds your heart couldn’t pump enough to support all of that mass. Nor could your bones support your mass against the force of gravity. Things just don’t often work the same when scaled up or down. At 6400 pounds your heart couldn’t pump enough to support all of that mass. Nor could your bones support your mass against the force of gravity. Things just don’t often work the same when scaled up or down.

13 Macro, micro, nano, what does it matter? Ok, let’s compare types of sugar, granular and powdered. Which one sticks to your fingers more easily? Right. Because the powdered one has more surface area and less volume per grain, it sticks more easily. The adhesive force between the tiny grain and your finger is stronger than the force of gravity trying to pull the grain off of your finger. Powdered sugar has a large surface area to small volume ratio. Macro, micro, nano, what does it matter? Ok, let’s compare types of sugar, granular and powdered. Which one sticks to your fingers more easily? Right. Because the powdered one has more surface area and less volume per grain, it sticks more easily. The adhesive force between the tiny grain and your finger is stronger than the force of gravity trying to pull the grain off of your finger. Powdered sugar has a large surface area to small volume ratio. On the other hand, it is harder for a dry grain of sugar to stick to your fingers because it has more mass and less surface area than the powdered sugar. Gravity is more likely to pull it off of your finger. `The adhesive force holding the grain to your finger is called van der Waal’s force. (It would be easier to remember if his name had been Smith.) We’ll be talking about that more later in this project. On the other hand, it is harder for a dry grain of sugar to stick to your fingers because it has more mass and less surface area than the powdered sugar. Gravity is more likely to pull it off of your finger. `The adhesive force holding the grain to your finger is called van der Waal’s force. (It would be easier to remember if his name had been Smith.) We’ll be talking about that more later in this project. How Sweet It IS!

14 Surface Area to Volume Ratio A good explanation of surface area/volume can be found at ssons/less/les9/area.html ssons/less/les9/area.html This is also a good site for information You can play with volume and surface area at p6/6.3/part2.htm#inst2 p6/6.3/part2.htm#inst2

15 How Can We See the Nanoworld? Or visit a photo gallery at these sites: alleria/photogallery.html alleria/photogallery.html ?cat=3 Or visit a photo gallery at these sites: alleria/photogallery.html alleria/photogallery.html ?cat=3 Use some of the microscopes that help us learn and understand the nanoworld at: tual/virtual.html tual/virtual.html Use some of the microscopes that help us learn and understand the nanoworld at: tual/virtual.html tual/virtual.html

16 Today’s Science at the Nanoscale? To find out what we’re learning at the nanoscale, click on To find out what we’re learning at the nanoscale, click on

17 For the latest discoveries in nanoscience click on rio_area=10 rio_area=10 For the latest discoveries in nanoscience click on rio_area=10 rio_area=10 What’s New in Nano? Nanoscience news can be found at


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