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What is a Concept Map? Concept maps often include: concepts or ideas, enclosed in circles or boxes. represented in hierarchical fashion relationships between.

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Presentation on theme: "What is a Concept Map? Concept maps often include: concepts or ideas, enclosed in circles or boxes. represented in hierarchical fashion relationships between."— Presentation transcript:

1 What is a Concept Map? Concept maps often include: concepts or ideas, enclosed in circles or boxes. represented in hierarchical fashion relationships between concepts, indicated by a connecting line. words on the line specify the precise relationship cross-links (relationships between concepts in different domains of the concept map). specific examples of events or objects help clarify meaning of a given concept From “The Theory Underlying Concept Maps and How to Construct Them,” by Joseph D. Novak. Online version available at

2 Novak, J.D. & Gowin, D.B. (1984). Learning How to Learn. New York: Cambridge University Press. Concept Map Sample…

3 From Map by Paul Rutherford. Concept Map Sample…

4 Not a Concept Map Sample… Life-Cycle Analysis Flow Chart

5 Uses of Concept Mapping BRAINSTORMING SUPPORT: Provides format and direction for planning and generating new ideas. STUDY AID: Facilitates effective note taking, summarizes newly learned concepts, or lends some structure or activity to reflective thinking. INSTRUCTIONAL TOOL: Serves as visual aid or schematic summary, demonstrates complex relationships, or provides a means for assessment of understanding or isolation of misconceptions.

6 Focus: Pre- and post-lesson assessments Help students and educators recognize what students already know. Focus students on subject at hand, and help them frame their own learning. Allow educators to catch misconceptions early.

7 Learning as Conceptual Change Students have pre-existing ideas, mental models, vocabulary, etc. (correct or incorrect). Student must understand relationships between existing ideas and concepts and newly-presented meanings for internalization to occur. Second language acquisition example.

8 Examples from Science & Technology for the Environment Students were asked to: draw concept maps of key ideas in assigned readings. draw simple concept maps, then elaborate and refine based on new information. Atmospheric System Example draw two concept maps comparing and contrasting environmental issues. Tropospheric Ozone vs. Stratospheric Ozone Depletion Global Climate Change vs. Ozone Depletion examine complexities of environmental problems using concept maps. Causes of extinction of a frog species

9 Application Green Building Discussion -- “What is a Green Building?” What are the benefits of this sort of exercise for students? For teachers? What are some possible shortcomings or limitations of concept maps?

10 Discussion Questions? Comments? Concerns?

11 Links to Concept Mapping Websites General / How To: - Offers general background information, as well as useful discussion of different types of concept maps. - General information. - General information. - General information, useful discussion of how to create concept maps. - "Improving Note Taking with Concept Maps." Software: - Most commonly used concept-mapping software. Site also contains information about theory, and instruction on mapping methods (see, for example, - Alternate concept-mapping software. Theory: - "The Theory Underlying Concept Maps and How To Construct Them," by J. D. Novak. Examples / Uses: - Programmable concept map that demonstrates their potential complexity and possible application. - Map of cellular respiration. - Discusses practical application of concept map as a hypertext tool.

12 Additional Resources Ausubel, D. P. (1963). The Psychology of Meaningful Verbal Learning. New York: Grune and Stratton. Ausubel, D. P. (1968). Educational Psychology: A Cognitive View. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Bloom, B. S. (1956). Taxonomy of Educational Objectives--The Classification of Educational Goals. New York: David McKay. Hyerle, D. (1996). Visual Tools for Constructing Knowledge. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Novak, J.D. & Gowin, D.B. (1984). Learning How to Learn. New York: Cambridge University Press.


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