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E X P E R I E N C E Y O U R A M E R I C A Invasive Species Early Detection: A National Park Service Approach Jennifer Stingelin Keefer Matthew R. Marshall.

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Presentation on theme: "E X P E R I E N C E Y O U R A M E R I C A Invasive Species Early Detection: A National Park Service Approach Jennifer Stingelin Keefer Matthew R. Marshall."— Presentation transcript:

1 E X P E R I E N C E Y O U R A M E R I C A Invasive Species Early Detection: A National Park Service Approach Jennifer Stingelin Keefer Matthew R. Marshall Brian R. Mitchell Margot W. Kaye Weeds Across Borders Conference June National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Inventory and Monitoring Program Northeast Region Photo by: Jeff Shreiner

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4 Eastern Rivers and Mountains Network (ERMN)

5 Why Invasive Species Early Detection (ISED)? Photo by: Leslie J. Mehrhoff “ Damages associated with alien invasive species effects and their control amount to approximately $120 billion/year.” -- Pimental et al., 2005

6 “Early Detection of Invasive Species: Surveillance Monitoring and Rapid Response Protocol” Goals Assist park managers with identifying high priority invasive species Quickly disseminate new occurrence information to all interested parties (NPS, public, private, etc.) Assess the risk presented by incipient populations Assist with management of newly detected species

7 Primary Objective Detect incipient populations (i.e., small or localized) and new introductions of target invasive species through opportunistic observations before the species become established.

8 Protocol Components Develop and maintain a list of target species that occur in localized areas of parks, are extremely rare, or are not currently present within a park, but have the potential to cause major ecological, cultural, or economic problems if they were to become established; Develop, maintain, and distribute appropriate target species identification information to all ERMN and NETN field crews and other interested cooperators, resource managers, and volunteers; Develop and maintain an early detection reporting and tracking system that disseminates information on potential infestations in a timely and efficient manner.

9 Species Lists & Prioritization Lists by park 4-step prioritization process Compiled list of present species Eliminated common and well established species Consulted relevant data sources from nearby parks, towns, counties etc. Conducted research and consulted with Natural Resource Managers species per list Lists reviewed annually

10 Field Guide

11 Field Guide cont.

12 Ex. Berberis thunbergii DC. (Japanese barberry) New River Gorge National River, West Virginia Reporting & Tracking

13 Alert System System of Designated Park Contacts (DPC) Central Invasive Species Early Detection Coordinator (ISEDC) Outside agencies, private organizations, Cooperative Weed Management Areas, etc. Detector Outside Organizations DPCISEDC Reporting & Tracking System

14 Is the ISED Protocol Working? Photo by: Jennifer Stingelin Keefer

15 Yes! 2008/2009 Early Detections 20 new plant and pest occurrences at 5 parks 9 new invasive species Detectors included a park biologist, ERMN vegetation monitoring crew, a biological technician, and The Animal and Plant Health inspection service (APHIS). Of the 15 new plant occurrences, 10 were hand- pulled or chemically treated Photo by: Jennifer Stingelin Keefer

16 Conclusion Anyone can do ISED! Regardless of size and resources, it is possible to create and implement a simple ISED system. Recognize & identify organizational strengths Ask for outside assistance—Don’t re-invent the wheel!

17 Future Directions Public education NPS visitor centers Boat launches Train additional NPS employees (maintenance crews, interpreters etc.) Volunteers

18 Reports, Publications & On-line Resources

19 Acknowledgements Dr. Matthew R. Marshall, Program Manager, NPS ERMN Dr. Brian R. Mitchell, Program Manager, NPS NETN Dr. Margot W. Kaye, Asst. Professor Forest Ecology, The Pennsylvania State University Dr. Leslie J. Mehrhoff, Director, Invasive Plant Atlas of New England (IPANE) Wayne Millington, Integrative Pest Management Coordinator, NPS Northeast Region Dr. Cynthia D. Huebner, Research Botanist, USFS

20 Questions? Jennifer Stingelin Keefer Invasive Species Early Detection Coordinator Eastern Rivers and Mountains Network (ERMN)


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