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Rose Gundersen, E.J.D. Co-founder and Executive Director

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1 Rose Gundersen, E.J.D. Co-founder and Executive Director
Apply the Collective Impact Model to create Sustainable and Strategic Partnerships I am Rose Gundersen. Thank you to Greg Vicars for inviting me to present the Collective Impact model and how it builds sustainable and strategic partnerships to solve complex social problems. Rose Gundersen, E.J.D. Co-founder and Executive Director

2 Network of anti-slavery activists & safe houses = Freedom Railroad
Harriet Tubman (1822 –1913) Network of anti-slavery activists & safe houses = Freedom Railroad Since my experience has been on fighting human trafficking, I will often refer to how WAE has applied it. To tell you that a small size woman like has been fighting human trafficking which is the fastest growing crime in the world, you may wonder how that is possible. I view Harriet Tubman’s success as a model – network + safehouses = Freedom Railroad. Today, I’ll share why I am committed and what collective impact’s potential could be to solve complex social problems, human trafficking for example.

3 American Dream I live the Dream
I grew up in the 3rd world and my parents did everything possible to send their children to American for education. I am living the Am dream!

4 Shattered Dream Modern-day Slavery
Threats of violence on victims & family overseas Debt bondage with visas withheld Today, however, many who come to the US to pursue the American dream find themselves living as modern-day slaves because there are criminals who take advantage of their vulnerability. They forced, threaten and exploit the dream seekers as commodities to “work” in places we see as normal workers. Worldwide, the number of slaves worldwide exceeds 27 million people - that's 43 TIMES the population of Seattle! Human trafficking is the fastest growing Modern-day Slavery

5 Underage WA teen rescued in Portland
Our Daughters College and Career 80% of human trafficking victims are women and children At least 100,000 domestic minors are exploited as sex trafficking victims Brutality & Hunger Underage WA teen rescued in Portland Study estimates that 90% of prostituted people (regardless of age) are trafficked by pimps Even more shocking is the fact that slavery exists in OUR nation! As a mother with a daughter in college, I cannot rest knowing that at least 100,000 mothers have underage daughters living in hell, trapped by force, fraud or coercion, and are sold over and over again into commercial sex every night. The average age of entering prostitution (sex trafficking) is years old. And King County is one of the nation's hot spots. Picture Safeco Field packed out. Now picture every seat filled by a girl 17 or younger. That's only HALF the number of kids - AMERICAN kids! - enslaved in the commercial sex industry in our nation! These are the reasons I am passionate to eradicate HT. Human trafficking is the fastest growing

6 WA State is awarded 1st in law of all 50 states
Our Work: LONG-TERM goals: Comprehensive Law Comprehensive Prevention WAE’s vision is to eradicate HT through building a UNIFIED EFFORT to accomplish two goals Comprehensive law Comprehensive prevention strategy To accomplish the first goal, we empowered a very supportive body of law makers in our Legislature by providing specific recommendations because the research work I conducted during law school, we networked with advocates to build a UNIFIED EFFORT through organizing three years of Anti-trafficking Engagement Day. We supported the passage of 20 pieces of legislation. This year, national policy organization Polaris Project awarded WA State the highest rating of all 50 states for enacting comprehensive law to combat human trafficking.

7 Are we still carrying our own puzzle piece
Are we still carrying our own puzzle piece? Are we having difficulty fitting with one another? On other fronts of combating human trafficking, however, the work still feels like this – a scattered puzzle. That’s why I studied collaboration models and came across Collective Impact

8 Collective Impact’s Five Conditions to Solve Complex Social Issues
A Common Agenda A Shared Measurement System Mutually Reinforcing Activities Continuous Communication Backbone Support Organizations The article discusses 5 crucial factors that must be incorporated into a successful collective impact project. Common Agenda- The organizations must come together to create a common goal and a plan to reach that goal collectively so that every group feels fully included and committed to the collaboration effort. Shared Measurement- The way in which progress is measured must be agreed upon and established ahead of time so that progress can be measured effectively and every can agree when progress is made or not. Mutually Reinforcing Activities- Although different groups will be working in different sectors, there must be support and collaboration demonstrated between the different sectors. The work of one sector should help reinforce other sectors in addition to working on their own. Continuous Communication- in order to track progress, adjust programs as necessary, and make sure every is accountable for their portion of the project communication regularly is key! Backbone Support Organizations- Having an organization whose sole responsibility is organizing and managing the various actors in various sectors is especially crucial in complex social issues because of the diversity and large number of components that need to all be working together.

9 Shape-Up Somerville, MA
Campaign’s Vision: to greatly reduce childhood obesity in Somerville, MA Scope: 1st -3rd Graders Before, During, and After school combined approach. Created two primary goals for all different facets to work toward: Increase exercise by 125kcal/day A sustainable program to change lifestyle 3 Phases / 3-year plan Community-wide program with many sectors involved Shape-Up Somerville was a project coordinated by a research group from Tufts University. They were researching an effective way to combat childhood obesity. Their target population was 1st-3rd graders, however to truly affect sustainable change they realized it would need to be a community-wide effort. Not only would 1st-3rd grade classrooms need to be involved but parents, before and after school programs, doctors, teachers, lunch-room staff, community leaders, and business owners would all need to be involved. Their two goals were: an increase in exercise of each child by 125kcal/day (Share measurement and a common goal for every sector to contribute to) A sustainable program that would continue to foster healthy and active lifestyles. They had a three year plan. Recruit a community that would allow researchers to implement the program, train staff, establish baseline data Implement intervention, monitor progress, make changes as necessary Change some programs based on data taken during the second year, continue to monitor and adapt programs. Throughout the community many different sectors were involved. - 90 Teachers were trained and provided more opportunity for nutrition education and physical activity in the classroom - 21 restaurants provided “Shape-Up Approved” meals for families to incorporate healthier eating at home and in the community - 100 different community events to promote healthier lives.

10 Program Targeted Every sector of the child’s daily life
-At home targeted through community outreach, newsletters, community events - School staff provided with new tools, training, and supplies -Teachers given different schedule, and more lesson time -Medical professionals trained and brought together to further understand -Government leaders included to implement policy change for sustainability Each separate sector had a specific goal of kcal/day increases that were used to support and work towards the common agenda of 125kcal/day

11 List of Community Partners
Tufts University Somerville Public Schools Somerville Youth Network MA Dept. of Health Cambridge Health Alliance Institute for Community Health Groundwork Somerville Active Living by Design Many different partners including Tufts University, Governmental Organizations, Community Groups, other NGO’s all working together.

12 What made Somerville work?
Willingness to embrace changes at all levels Continuous communication, education, & training Modeling and Reinforcement of Governmental and Community Policies Collaborations and partnerships with schools, community leaders, parents and community groups. Continuous reinvestment in program facilities, equipment and infrastructure. Grant Funding: Shape Up Somerville, PEP, Growing Health Planning and a positive, proactive approach to problem solving Always keeping the kids (or those you are serving) first -Somerville was asked what factors made this project so successful and as we can see, a lot of the factors they describe are evident and supportive of the 5 conditions the collective impact article discussed.

13 How do their conditions match with our the Five Conditions?
Common Agenda- All groups worked towards common goal of increased physical activity create sustainable infrastructure encouraging activity and healthy eating Always keeping the kids (or those you are serving) first Shared Measurement: Agreed upon measure to determine effectiveness: Kcal/day used to measure increase in activity Mutually Reinforcing Activities Before/During/Afterschool all reinforced common ideals cumulatively combating obesity. Modeling and Reinforcement of Governmental and Community Policies Continuous Communication Scheduled “check-ins” and meetings to assess success and adjust plans Continuous communication, education, & training Backbone Support Organizations Researchers and Students did not implement programs but were responsible for organizing and coordinating a variety of efforts to stimulate programs. Collaborations and partnerships with schools, community leaders, parents and community groups. Wrap-up/Summary of 5 conditions and how the Somerville program incorporates each one.

14 The Elizabeth River Project
Collective impact approach to restore a river in Portsmouth, VA Industries, Businesses, Schools, Municipalities, Federal Government, and Non-profits Uses demographic-specific programs to target multi-sectors River Stars and River Stars Schools, River Otter Society, The Learning Barge, Adult Education Guiding Principals: Build strong partnerships through a collaborative approach. Incorporate public education into every action. Plan proactively to reduce the impacts of rising sea levels. Monitor progress in each action area, using "indicators" tracked against a baseline. Promote environmental justice for all stakeholders. The Elizabeth River Project is a collective aimed at environmental river restoration in Portsmouth, VA for one of the most polluted river systems in the nation This collective includes Industries, Businesses, Schools, Municipalities, Federal Government, and non-profits that came together to address the issue of river pollution both out of an environmental concern but also a social one To achieve their goals of pollution reduction and awareness ERP uses demographic-specific programs Some of which include the River Stars and River Stars Schools Program which identifies businesses and schools to become committed to the river project (it’s more used as a social identifier), River Otter and Mummichog Society (a donation and membership based support societies), The Learning Barge (which is a floating wetland classroom), and through Adult Education programs ERP acts as the overarching support and organizing staff to all subsidiary programs with the Guiding Principals of: Building strong partnerships through a collaborative approach. Incorporating public education into every action. Planning proactively to reduce the impacts of rising sea levels. Monitoring progress in each action area, using "indicators" tracked against a baseline. Promoting environmental justice for all stakeholders. and Watershed Report 2008

15 Steps Towards Progress
Year-by-year “Road Map” and step-by-step achievable action plan in place: Seven Steps including: Sediment clean up, restoring wetlands, oysters, and forests, increase oxygen levels, reduce harmful bacteria, environmental responsibility for business and development, integrate policies and regulations, create a call to action with roles for all. Details specific challenge, deadline goals (2014 & 2020), and possible solutions and actions to achieve desired results. And so by doing these things, ERP has created a year-by-year “Road Map” that effectively acts as a step-by-step achievable action plan which is comprised of Seven Steps including: Sediment clean up, restoring wetlands, oysters, and forests, increasing oxygen levels, reducing harmful bacteria, environmental responsibility for business and development, integrating policies and regulations, and creating a call to action with roles for all. This outline details the specific challenges, deadline goals (2014 & 2020), and possible solutions and actions to achieve desired results. Watershed Report 2008

16 KnowledgeWorks – an initiative to transform education in the US
Vision: Students are prepared for tomorrow’s challenges with the ability to create, adapt and solve problems Goals: To effect meaningful policy and structural change (to support the reform) at local and state levels, and To ensure change can survive across time and political shifts (sustainability). Emphasis: Not just to change an isolated school, but the structure within which education operates Moving onto our next example, KnowledgeWorks is an initiative to transform education in the United States, which began with the group’s desire to provide quality education and access to all students – particularly recognizing the needs of low-income students and families as well. They have three parts to this initiative that include having a vision to prepare students for tomorrow’s challenges with the ability to create, adapt and solve problems. Their goals are to effect meaningful policy and structural change (and most critically, to support the reform) at local and state levels (which includes challenging assumptions about what schools look like and how they operate), and to ensure that this change can survive across time and political shifts (or to make sure that their efforts are sustainable through nurturing partnerships and building systems across education and social systems in 26 states). Finally KW recognizes and emphasizes that we cannot solely change an isolated school or target a specific grade level only, but that the structure of education needs to be changed to promote success.

17 The Strive Model - Cincinnati, OH (a subsidiary of KnowledgeWorks)
Education Coalition: Connects leaders at all levels and across all sectors in a community (“Cradle to Career”) Over 300 groups: philanthropies, colleges, public agencies, non-profits, and businesses) United around a common vision for education and a set of student outcomes (goals, measurements and results) In order for KW to achieve its overarching goals of education reform and student success, they have branched out into several subsidiary groups. To mention briefly, they have three that include EdWorks, New Tech Network, and Strive. To give some background, the city of Cincinnati and its schools deal daily with the problems that arise from poverty which greatly affect both teaching and learning within the city. More than 70 percent of the city’s children live in low-income households and until recently, less than half of the entering kindergartners were deemed ready to start school. Nearly three in 10 students were dropping out of high school, and most of those who graduated were not prepared if and when they enrolled in college. However, in the past five years the city began seeing marked increases across many academic indicators and the city made the greatest gains of any urban school district in Ohio. Many leaders attribute this success to the coalition of over 300 groups (including philanthropies, colleges, public agencies, non-profits and businesses), which collectively are called the Strive Partnership of Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky. The group’s “cradle-to-career” approach attempts to coordinate every service and support that children and adolescents need, and at every stage of their education and development. Offerings include mentoring, tutoring, health care, arts programs, preschool, and financial aid for college and does this by connecting various leaders of these areas together to provide more holistic support for students and their families. All of these groups are united around a common vision for education and have agreed upon sets of goals, measurements, and results to help monitor progress and Strive as an agency organizes and manages all of these collective efforts.

18 Student Road Map a shared agenda developed together
This Road Map visual is one that was created to demonstrate the scope of what steps (and at what junctures) students needed to be passing certain success markers (that were determined by the Strive coalition and its partners). This also combines academic benchmarks with support that needs to be had in family and student life. We feel that this road map is a highly effective visual tool in laying out progress and allowing all stakeholders to know collective goals and benchmarks, and we’d like you to take inspiration from this visual to apply to our efforts of creating a similar roadmap for human trafficking in our area and maybe what that would look like.

19 The Strive Model Public policy and school support reform: Advocacy:
Improves systems and services by promoting collaboration and data-driven decision making Implements action plans of high impact strategies effectively and efficiently Advocacy: Advocates for public and private resources to support what works for children The Strive Model aims at providing public policy and school support reform, which parallels and supports the aim of its parent organization KW. Through this they aim at improving systems and services by promoting collaboration across sectors and making data-driven decisions to provide the most accurate measures of student success and analysis. These data-driven indicators include graduation rates, reading comprehension levels, ACT scores, etc. They also recognize that they needed to target as many students as possible to make effective change, but that these strategies needed to be completed successfully and efficiently. Strive also performs advocacy works for public and private resources to support what works best for children and recognizing that the needs of families and children come first in all that they need to be doing

20 Strive Partnership in Cincinnati
Outcome1: Increased graduation and college enrollment rates Better kindergarten preparation (readiness) Student and family area support Impact – Strive Network (www.strivenetwork.org) It is working with university anchors in nine other cities to implement partnerships based on the Strive framework. What have the outcomes been for Strive? They’ve seen increased graduation and college enrollment rates, better kindergarten preparation, and more access for student and family support services. And their impact nationwide from their efforts in Cincinnati have been that currently Strive is working with university anchors in nine other cities to implement partnerships based on their model. 1:

21 The Strive Network Benefit: Enables members to share expertise, identify and adapt programs that work and develop effective tools and resources that can be brought to bear on specific challenges. (http://strivenetwork.org/strive-network)

22 Details of Strive Partnership’s Five Conditions
Common Agenda Increasing kindergarten readiness; supporting students inside and outside of school; providing academic help; encouraging students to graduate and enroll in college, and complete college well prepared to enter the workforce and succeed. Shared Measurements 54 data-based, shared measurements: e.g. High school graduation rates, college enrollment rates, test scores, pre-school readiness data, etc. that indicate progress at 5 major points for a student between kindergarten and workforce readiness. Mutually Reinforcing Activities Strive assigns specific tasks for individual partners in alignment with community-level indicators, identifies data needed to monitor progress, and sets annual program performance goals. Continuous Communication Interaction between Strive professional staff and partners Annual reporting to demonstrate partners’ progress and increase accountability Backbone Support Organizations KnowledgeWorks, support staff, guided by an executive committee that includes corporate CEOs, leaders of corporate and private foundations, the superintendents of five local school systems, presidents of local universities, and executive directors of the most influential education nonprofits and advocacy groups. functions as an intermediary and executes on those decisions. works with service providers to help them continuously improve their outcomes. It advocates for its policy agenda to align community giving around its priorities. To conclude how we see Strive using the model against the five conditions they have a: Common Agenda Increasing kindergarten readiness; supporting students inside and outside of school; providing academic help; encouraging students to graduate and enroll in college, and complete college well prepared to enter the workforce and succeed. Shared Measurements 54 data-based, shared measurements: e.g. High school graduation rates, college enrollment rates, test scores, pre-school readiness data, etc. that indicate progress at 5 major points for a student between kindergarten and workforce readiness. Mutually Reinforcing Activities Strive assigns specific tasks for individual partners in alignment with community-level indicators, identifies data needed to monitor progress, and sets annual program performance goals. Continuous Communication Interaction between Strive professional staff and partners Annual reporting to demonstrate partners’ progress and increase accountabilities Backbone Support Organizations KnowledgeWorks, support staff, guided by an executive committee that includes corporate CEOs, leaders of corporate and private foundations, the superintendents of five local school systems, presidents of local universities, and executive directors of the most influential education nonprofits and advocacy groups. Functions as an intermediary and executes on those decisions. Works with service providers to help them continuously improve their outcomes. It advocates for its policy agenda to align community giving around its priorities.

23 Mars Chocolate Company
Primary Goal: A Revitalized Cocoa Sector in Cote d’Ivoire Objectives: Build capacity of intermediary organizations to work with farmers in each community on the following: Set up Farmer Field Schools Improve communities’ financial management Adoption of sustainable land management Implement literacy programs Educate and Sensitize communities in health issues like HIV/AIDS, TB, Malaria etc. Identify and Implement measure to eliminate abusive labor practices Mars Chocolate realized that the current trajectory of the cocoa sector was not sustainable for their market needs and so they implemented a plan to revitalize the cocoa sector, specifically in the Ivory Coast and Ghana. They acknowledged that effective change would have to encompass every aspect of the community including education, healthcare, nutrition and agricultural development to truly revitalize not just the cocoa sector but the communities. -By 2020, all cocoa supply certified -Impact 150,000 farmers over 10 years -Raise yields to more than 1 metric ton per hectare of land -Focus on farmer practices: pruning, pesticide and fertilizer use - Develop, multiply and provide improved planting material - Integrate with community development -Work with partners among processors, branded manufacturers and other institutions to reach sector wide scale -Increase educational opportunities and healthcare to improve quality of life and increase ability to farm

24 Key Components Communities develop their own community action plan and set their own priorities for its implementation Deliver training, material, planning and management skills to build the respective constructions and capacities In all instances, iMPACT works through collaboration with relevant government institutions (the Ministries for Agriculture, Health and Education) Collaboration ensures capacity building not only in the communities but also in the public sector, and Concerted effort ensures the sustainability. Mars targeted 19 communities primarily in the Ivory Coast. -Each community needed slightly different programs to affect necessary changes in their community so each community’s needs were assessed and a personalized action plan incorporating the necessary elements of education, healthcare, and agriculture were developed. -Some needed more healthcare than others, some had education but really needed agricultural development, etc.

25 Partners: existing Intermediary Organizations
Mars Chocolate Partners International Cocoa Initiative (labor issue) IFESH (sustainable education) Sustainable Tree Crop Programme Rainforest Alliance (Certification of cocoa) Africare (Healthcare) German Technical Cooperation (bus mgmt of farm) Mars worked with these organizations that were already in existence working in the various sectors in Africa. By unifying these organizations into a common project, the needs and aid could be more effectively implemented and delivered. Mars is the central, backbone support organizations, helping to coordinate the various other actors involved. International Cocoa Initiative- Worked primarily on labor issues International Federation of Education and Self-Help- Educational development, but focused on sustainable educational development and helping the communities to create their own effective programs that will last. Sustainable Tree Crop Programme- Primarily agricultural development for farmers: from more effective planting and harvesting techniques to alternative crop rotation. Rainforest Alliance- Certification organizations: This group previously worked with Mars to certify the Galaxy Chocolate bar in the UK, now they help to ensure and track progress towards the certification of the entire cocoa sector. Certification is similar to fair trade dealing with labor standards, agricultural standards and a variety of other benchmarks for certification. Africare- Focuses primarily on healthcare needs. From HIV/AIDS education, clean water, nutrition. Not just about getting healthcare, but helping find access. Digging wells, creating roads to more easily access existing resources. German Technical Cooperation- Agricultural development, marketing and business management, some HIV/AIDS work as well. Holistically these programs come together, each focusing on their sub-section of the project to create a cohesive program that deals with the many different facets related to cocoa sector revitilization

26 Results after 3 years 40,000 People impacted
70% of farmers adopted sustainable agricultural practices Measured improvement in cocoa quality, productivity, and income Decreased child labor and improved education 75% follow recommendations for HIV/AIDS prevention After 3 years, Well on their way to meeting their goals of 150,000 in 10 years, agricultural practices are improving as seen by the increase in yield and quality of the cocoa being grown. Actual numbers were not found, but from my research it would seem that decrease in child labor is linked to an increase in children taking advantage of educational opportunities instead of farming which was made possible through advancement in agricultural abilities of farmers, and an increase in the teaching and cultural understanding of the role education can play in the lives of the children. HIV/AIDS prevention includes healthcare education and awareness efforts, malaria prevention through mosquito nets and other awareness efforts

27 How does their project align with the five conditions?
Common Agenda Mars Chocolate funded the programs implemented by the many different organizations and therefore maintained a cohesive campaign Shared Measurement Their studies used agreed upon measures, and having interim goals along the way helps to keep pace and assess progress being made 3. Mutually Reinforcing Activities Each sub-section worked to support and encourage the other programs and goals. 4. Continuous Communication Regular meetings, focus groups, adjustments 5. Backbone Support Organizations Mars chocolate established both a Mars chocolate position to oversee the project as well as government agents whose sole role was oversight and assessment of the program Overview of the way in which the mars chocolate model incorporates the various conditions outlines by the collective impact article

28 Inspiration and Intrigues?
What intrigues you about the examples shared? Are you inspired by these examples and how? Interested in developing a collective model for combating human trafficking? What will it look like?

29 Result: Impact Multiplication and Sustainability
WA Engage: the hub for CATs, the broker for tools & best practices, the connector to resources Operating Principles: Centralized support Accountability Communication Measurable goals Develop & Implement : assessment & prevention tools Result: Impact Multiplication and Sustainability WA Engage as the Hub, Broker, Connector Federal Way Thurston County Kittitas County Tri-Cities Yakima Other communities Here is our strategy if funding is obtained: WAE will function as the centralized structure develop and implement the comprehensive prevention strategy. We will train our community team leaders to apply these operating principles to ensure results and measurable success. In turn, each community team leader will function as the centralized coordinator to unify efforts and support local organizations to implement the prevention strategy at the community level. The collective result of building the unified effort is impact multiplication and sustainability.

30 Assessment Prevention Kit
Surveys will raise awareness and establish baselines: Qualify understanding Quantity awareness and training needs Collect anecdotal and quantifiable data Identify current and potential resources Prevention Kit Assess and broker tool and best practices for relevancy and delivery to communities Develop community based tools and support system Network and document and assess successes and challenges to improve and replicate As our first step, we plan to develop a set of Community Baseline Assessments and a Community Prevention Tool Kit. The Community Baseline Assessment will help establish baseline to ensure all action steps in that community can be targeted to needs identified and can be measured: Assess resources in various sectors like criminal justice, educators/youth organizations, social service providers, medical providers, businesses, etc. Establish a baseline for each community to determine needs and service gaps, set priorities, and set measurable goals Assessment objectives: Qualify community’s understanding of human trafficking Quantify level of awareness and training needs Collect anecdotal and quantifiable data on cases Identify current and potential community resources The Prevention Kit will accomplish those objectives.

31 Map out allies in Federal Way and South King County?
City Vision Other municipalities Law Enforcement Schools Boys and Girls Club Service groups Shelters Job training Protection Prevention Partner-ships Prosecution Can we map out and align potential resources available in Federal Way and South King County to implement assessment and the prevention tool kit to achieve the ultimate goal of prventing human trafficking?

32 website: www.WAEngage.com
Join the Movement Executive Director/Co-founder: Rose Gundersen, E.J.D Board President/Community Associate: Brenda Oliver website:


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