Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Issues in Interpreting Correlations:. Correlation does not imply causality: X might cause Y. Y might cause X. Z (or a whole set of factors) might cause.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Issues in Interpreting Correlations:. Correlation does not imply causality: X might cause Y. Y might cause X. Z (or a whole set of factors) might cause."— Presentation transcript:

1 Issues in Interpreting Correlations:

2 Correlation does not imply causality: X might cause Y. Y might cause X. Z (or a whole set of factors) might cause both X and Y.

3 Factors affecting the size of a correlation coefficient: 1. Sample size and random variation: The larger the sample, the more stable the correlation coefficient. Correlations obtained with small samples are unreliable.

4 Conclusion: you need a large sample before you can be really sure that your sample r is an accurate reflection of the population r. Limits within which 80% of sample r's will fall, when the true (population) correlation is 0: Sample size:80% limits for r: to to to to to to +.09

5 2. Linearity of the relationship: Pearson’s r measures the strength of the linear relationship between two variables; r will be misleading if there is a strong but non-linear relationship. e.g.:

6 3. Range of talent (variability): The smaller the amount of variability in X and/or Y, the lower the apparent correlation. e.g.:

7 4. Homoscedasticity (equal variability): r describes the average strength of the relationship between X and Y. Hence scores should have a constant amount of variability at all points in their distribution. in this region: low variability of Y (small Y-Y' ) in this region: high variability of Y (large Y-Y' ) regression line

8 5. Effect of discontinuous distributions: A few outliers here distort things considerably. There is no real correlation between X and Y.

9 Deciding what is a "good" correlation: A moderate correlation could be due to either (a) sampling variation (and hence a "fluke"); or (b) a genuine association between the variables concerned. How can we tell which of these is correct?

10 Large negative correlations: unlikely to occur by chance Large positive correlations: unlikely to occur by chance r = 0 Small correlations: likely to occur by chance Distribution of r's obtained using samples drawn from two uncorrelated populations of scores:

11 r = -.44r = +.44 r = For an N of 20: 5 out of 100 random samples are likely to produce an r of.44 or larger, merely by chance (i.e., even though in the population, there was no correlation at all!).

12 Thus we arbitrarily decide that: (a) If our sample correlation is so large that it would occur by chance only 5 times in a hundred, we will assume that it reflects a genuine correlation in the population from which the sample came. (b) If a correlation like ours is likely to occur by chance more often than this, we assume it has arisen merely by chance, and that it is not evidence for a correlation in the parent population.

13 How do we know how likely it is to obtain a sample correlation as large as ours by chance? Tables (in the back of many statistics books and on my website) give this information for different sample sizes. An illustration of how to use these tables: Suppose we take a sample of 20 people, and measure their eye-separation and back hairiness. Our sample r is.75. Does this reflect a true correlation between eye-separation and hairiness in the parent population, or has our r arisen merely by chance (i.e. because we have a freaky sample)?

14 Step 1: Calculate the "degrees of freedom" (df = the number of pairs of scores, minus 2). Here, we have 20 pairs of scores, so df = 18. Step 2: Find a table of "critical values for Pearson's r".

15 Part of a table of "critical values for Pearson's r": Level of significance (two-tailed) df With 18 df, a correlation of.4438 or larger will occur by chance with a probability of.05: i.e., if we took 100 samples of 20 people, about 5 of those samples are likely to produce an r of.4438 or larger (even though there is actually no correlation in the population!).

16 Part of a table of "critical values for Pearson's r": Level of significance (two-tailed) df With 18 df, a correlation of.5614 or larger will occur by chance with a probability of.01: i.e., if we took 100 samples of 20 people, about 1 of those 100 samples is likely to give an r of.5614 or larger (again, even though there is actually no correlation in the population!).

17 Part of a table of "critical values for Pearson's r": Level of significance (two-tailed) df With 18 df, a correlation of.6787 or larger will occur by chance with a probability of.001: i.e., if we took 1000 samples of 20 people, about 1 of those 1000 samples is likely to give an r of.6787 or larger (again, even though there is actually no correlation in the population!).

18 The table shows that an r of.6787 is likely to occur by chance only once in a thousand times. Our obtained r is.75. This is larger than Hence our obtained r of.75 is likely to occur by chance less than one time in a thousand (p<.001). Conclusion: Any sample correlation could in principle occur due to chance or because it reflects a true relationship in the population from which the sample was taken. Because our r of.75 is so unlikely to occur by chance, we can safely assume that there really is a relationship between eye-separation and back-hairiness.

19 Important point: Do not confuse statistical significance with practical importance. We have just assessed "statistical significance" - the likelihood that our obtained correlation has arisen merely by chance. Our r of.75 is "highly significant" (i.e., highly unlikely to have arisen by chance). However, a weak correlation can be statistically significant, if the sample size is large enough...

20 e.g. with 100 df, an r of.1946 is "significant" in the sense that it is unlikely to have arisen by chance (r's bigger than this will occur by chance only 5 in a 100 times). The coefficient of determination (r 2 ) shows that this is not a strong relationship in a practical sense; knowledge of one of the variables would account for only 3.79% of the variance in the other - completely useless for predictive purposes!


Download ppt "Issues in Interpreting Correlations:. Correlation does not imply causality: X might cause Y. Y might cause X. Z (or a whole set of factors) might cause."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google