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Session Goals Defining communication, awareness raising and advocacy for libraries Learning to develop advocacy goal for solving your library’s problem.

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Presentation on theme: "Session Goals Defining communication, awareness raising and advocacy for libraries Learning to develop advocacy goal for solving your library’s problem."— Presentation transcript:

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3 Session Goals Defining communication, awareness raising and advocacy for libraries Learning to develop advocacy goal for solving your library’s problem / perception problem Learning to distinguish between target audiences and partnerships

4 What we mean by: Communication = skills of communication and presentation (interpersonal and public) Awareness Raising = content & techniques for general audiences Advocacy = content & techniques for decision maker audiences

5 Why Libraries? Libraries are potential engine for social and economic change Public libraries are trusted local organization with access to information, that can power economic opportunities and community development Libraries are important local assets that can provide access to information and technology to everyone, free of charge

6 Why all this? Why Libraries?

7 Kaspars Rūklis "Opinion Leaders: Process

8 Activities Outreach Awareness Raising Public Relations Media Relations

9 Example: Library Image

10 Activities Marketing Branding Advocacy

11 Example: Love Both Ways

12 What is Advocacy Goal? Advocacy Goal is the specific action a library wants people to take to help solve a problem the library faces.

13 Developing Advocacy Goal Problem / Challenge  Solution  Advocacy Goal

14 Example Problem  Libraries do not have computers for public use and slow internet connection speed Solution  Public internet access established as core service; funding for new computers, software and internet speed update is allocated Advocacy Goal  To have local municipality establish internet access in libraries as a core service and allocate continued funding for new hardware, software and internet speed updates X schillings per year

15 Exercise Develop advocacy goal for your project, based on your project outcomes Present the goal to the audience ARG presents their plan

16 What is Target Audience? Target Audience (for advocacy) refers to a person or group of people that can help bring about the changes to policies, funding, or partnerships that a public library needs to meets its advocacy goal.

17 Target Audience for Advocacy Decision makers, such as a mayor or member of the City Council and People, who can influence the decision makers

18 What is a Partnership? Library partnerships are relationships that provide mutual benefit for both the library and the partner. Image from Latvia Advocacy Training Presentation

19 Existing and New Partners Who are your existing partners? Who are the individuals and organizations you have never approached to discuss library partnership but who you think would be interesting partners?

20 Exercise Determining target audiences and partners Presenting them and dividing them up (well- poor informed, positive-not so positive attitude towards the library)

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22 Session Goals Determining the connection and ties between Impact Assessment Data and Advocacy Finding ways to use this data in real advocacy efforts

23 Steps Community needs Government policies ICT tools and resources Innovative service Social and economic change Partners Advocacy activities …. more funding for libraries Impact / outcome assessment Source: Monika Elbert, EIFL

24 Libraries and Communities From telling WHAT libraries provide, to proving HOW libraries change the lives of individuals and the community Source: Monika Elbert, EIFL

25 Inputs - something that is put in to achieve result e.g. number of staff, computers Inputs - something that is put in to achieve result e.g. number of staff, computers Activities – number of tasks which must be completed to achieve result e.g. training, events, services installed Activities – number of tasks which must be completed to achieve result e.g. training, events, services installed Outputs - immediate countable result of a activities e.g. number of sessions organized, number of people trained Outputs - immediate countable result of a activities e.g. number of sessions organized, number of people trained Impact, or changes resulting from the activity e.g. increased income, improved employment prospects, better health or crops.. Impact, or changes resulting from the activity e.g. increased income, improved employment prospects, better health or crops.. OUTCOME MAP What to Measure? Source: Monika Elbert, EIFL

26 Example - EIYE Inputs – 15 PCs, 3 printers, etc Inputs – 15 PCs, 3 printers, etc Activities – training courses, setting up a database Outputs – 300 youth trained as trainers; up to 700 trained Outputs – 300 youth trained as trainers; up to 700 trained Outcomes – ?? XX found jobs? x% reduction in loitering and drug taking? Outcomes – ?? XX found jobs? x% reduction in loitering and drug taking? Source: Monika Elbert, EIFL

27 Linking Impact and Advocacy Evidence of impact is more convincing to stakeholders than statistics alone Advocacy needs robust data and well documented stories in order to be credible and trustworthy Evidence of impact helps sustain momentum, funding, and political support, when well communicated (targeted advocacy) Source: Monika Elbert, EIFL

28 Example: Advocacy + Impact

29 Group Discussion How did you find out your community needs? What data (if any) was collected? What impact should be measured and for whom is this data intented?

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31 Session Goals Identify survey data to be used for library awareness raising, communication and advocacy Identify “soft” data, like success stories, to be used for library awareness raising, communication and advocacy Review the findings of EIFL’s Library Perception Study and think of potential uses of the data

32 Library Data By understanding what your target audience thinks and feels you can determine the best way to approach and connect with your target audiences to encourage their involvement for support of libraries

33 Data Quantitative data = numbers Qualitative data = stories

34 Data Statistics Surveys Interviews, focus groups Analysis of documents, reports, media stories Case studies – In the form of text, photos, film, audio, etc.

35 Example: Hans Rosling

36 Perception Study – Ghana Over 70% of people interviewed perceive public libraries as spaces for books and study rather than as dynamic institutions focused on community development needs.

37 Perception Study – Ghana There is agreement that two of the major challenges facing public libraries are lack of funding and technology. This agreement, coupled with positive feeling toward public libraries, presents fertile ground for advocacy for support to modernize public libraries, to expand and diversify public library services, and to secure their future sustainability.

38 Perception Study – Ghana A typical user is likely to be a young single male from a middle class background aged between 16 and 30.  72% of users are men.  95% are aged between 16 and 30.  80% are students.  Only 28% of library users are women.

39 Perception Study – Ghana Library technology services and librarians’ skills to provide them are limited. –  Only 10% of users are using computers or the Internet in public libraries in Ghana. –  Just under 60% of libraries have computers, but these are mainly for the operations of the library and not for – users. Only 24% of libraries surveyed have computers for users. – A significant number of librarians (37%) feel they do not have sufficient technology skills to offer ICT-related services and computer training.

40 Perception Study – Ghana Library technology services and librarians’ skills to provide them are limited. There is wide recognition that public libraries can provide services ranging from culture to community development. Libraries need more funding.

41 Example: Never Say Never

42 Exercise Choose one outcome from your project (outcome maps) Discuss with your project team what data can you use for communication and in advocacy Put one data piece on a separate small sheet of paper Afterwards present it to the whole group and determine target audiences for each

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44 Session Goals Identify the connections between library data and advocacy content Get tips for crafting messages and putting together library stories

45 What is Key Advocacy Message? Key Advocacy Message is a strong, effective message that can provide people outside of the library with a clear understanding of the library’s advocacy goal and a way to help the library reach that goal.

46 Message Message is a core statement that explains in a nutshell: Your problem Your goal Why your audience should care What your audience can do to help

47 Effective Messages Image from EIFL Message Toolkit

48 Exercise Work in small groups Discuss your target audience and three possible messages to be used in advocacy Present messages to the whole group

49 Library Stories Library factual story Library narrative story Images from Latvia Advocacy Training Presentation

50 Library Stories Library inspirational story Integrated library story Images from Latvia Advocacy Training Presentation

51 Example: Empowering Story

52 Exercise Work on including messages into stories Keep your target audience in mind

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54 Session Goals Working with different kinds of media: traditional, self-edited, social Determining which channels are best for what purposes

55 Traditional – Broadcast – Social Media

56 Traditional Media Radio Television Print Online

57 Social Media Social media describes the online tools that people use to share content, opinions, insights, experiences, and perspectives, and helps facilitate online conversations between groups of people.

58 Social Media Examples Facebook is a popular social networking tool with more than 600 million users worldwide. On Facebook, it is important to keep comment fresh, interesting, and engaging to attract and keep fans. Twitter is a “micro blog” that encourages posting frequent but brief (up to 140 characters) messages. Twitter is best used for sharing news and quick updates on our organization – you can shorten links to articles by using a site like bit.ly to more easily stay within the character limit. YouTube is a great way to share videos that relate to your organization. By setting up a page on YouTube you can post and tag videos that are relevant to your audience.

59 Example: Social Media Handbook

60 What to Use for What? Image from Pinnacle

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62 Session Goals Media today and in the future Media outreach Do’s and Dont’s

63 Media Today and Tomorrow TodayIn the Future Press and media relations: print media Online communication Press and media relations: online media Face to face communicationSocial media Press and media relations: online media Face to face communication Press and media relations: TV and radio Press and media relations: print media

64 Media Outreach Raise awareness of library programs and services Highlight accomplishments Tell your story your way and amplify your message Raise the profile of public libraries Build credibility for the library Build allies in the media

65 Do’s Do tell the truth – ALWAYS. Do be honest and accurate. Your credibility and reputation depend on it. Do admit it if you don’t know the answer to a question. Offer to get the answer, and do so as quickly as you can.

66 Do’s Do correct mistakes immediately. State that you didn’t give an adequate answer, and you would like to clear up the confusion. Do avoid using jargon. Speak in plain language. Do assume that everything you say is on the record.

67 Do’s Do be as open with the media as possible. Do call reporters if a story appears that is inaccurate. Politely point out what was wrong and substantiate it. Do keep a list of accomplishments. Update it frequently.

68 Do’s Do always return phone calls, or have someone return the calls, in time for reporters to meet deadlines. Do try to get the information reporters want even if it means an extra effort. Do have a sense of humor.

69 Media

70 Dont’s Don’t lie – EVER. Don’t say “ No Comment” – EVER. Don’t improvise, don’t speculate, and don’t guess. Good reporters check facts, if you are wrong, your credibility will be destroyed.

71 Dont’s Don’t try to put a comment “off the record” after you have said it. Don’t be unresponsive. Don’t make news until you have in hand the information to go with it.

72 Dont’s Don’t make an announcement and then later prepare a press release and fact sheets. If you have the material prepared for a press conference, you can spend your time after an announcement explaining it to the press. Don’t cover up. If you lie or cover up, you lose your credibility. Don’t avoid reporters’ phone calls.

73 Press Releases Be sure there is news Use facts, stories Use inverted pyramide style Write for your audience, do not use “bureaucratic” language

74 Inverted Pyramid CATCHY HEADLINE NEWEST INFORMATION What? Where? When? Why? How? SUPPORTING INFORMATION BACGROUND I N F O OTHER

75 Interviews Be sure you know your message/s Prepare for the interview Make interview yours

76 Exercise Using your messages and stories, please, adjust them for use: – In a TV interview – In a radio interview – In an interview for a print publication – In an interview for online publication – In social media

77 Example: Self-Edited Media

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79 Session Goals Tips on how to make your presentations a smashing success How to use your message in all kinds of presentations: in ones that are short and also in the ones that are, unfortunately, too long

80 Strong Presentation Preparation Introduction Content organization Conclusion Image: Everythingoncamera.com

81 Words, Body-Language BodyVoice PostureVolume Facial expressionsTone Eye contactClarity GesturesPace

82 Verbal and Nonverbal Communication

83 Example: Bergen Library

84 Twenty Powerful Words Now, Today, Immediately, Free, Save, Health, Safe, Proven, Discover, Learn, Know, Understand, You/Your, Protect, Create, Trust, Powerful, Help, Profit Source: Stratch INRA Hooper

85 The Rule of Thirds Image from:

86 Images and Stories Behind Them A picture is worth a thousand words Taking and selecting dynamic pictures that tell your story Staging a picture in advance or taking a moment snap-shot

87 Infographics

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89 Credentials Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Training Program “Global Libraries Advocacy Training” materials, 2011 Father’s Third Son (Latvia) Advocacy Curriculum for Latvia’s Public Libraries, 2011 American Library Association’s “Library Advocate’s Handbook”, 2008 Interactive Training Ltd material “Newsletters”, 2011 Marguerite Sullivan. “A Responsible Press Office: An Insider’s Guide”, 2008


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