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Focusing Your Oracle Database Tuning Efforts For PeopleSoft Applications Bobby Durrett U. S. Foodservice, Inc.

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Presentation on theme: "Focusing Your Oracle Database Tuning Efforts For PeopleSoft Applications Bobby Durrett U. S. Foodservice, Inc."— Presentation transcript:

1 Focusing Your Oracle Database Tuning Efforts For PeopleSoft Applications Bobby Durrett U. S. Foodservice, Inc.

2 Introduction PeopleSoft is a complicated application There are many things that can be tuned – hardware, operating system, Oracle and the application There are many books, articles, etc. on Oracle tuning Need a way to focus your efforts on the one area that will help the most

3 Oracle Server Processes Each PeopleSoft program connects to an Oracle server process If a PeopleSoft program that you care about is slow you need to see where its Oracle process is spending its time If you can find out where the server process is spending the majority of its time you can focus your tuning efforts on reducing that time

4 Oracle Server Processes - continued A reduction in the Oracle server processs time will result in an equal reduction in the PeopleSoft programs time An Oracle server process is a window on all the other pieces of the database - it is where the PeopleSoft application touches everything else on the database server

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6 Performance Profile Oracle supplies CPU time and wait time for a server process You can produce a Performance Profile of the server process or session CPU time Wait time Elapsed time – end time minus start time CPU time plus wait time should equal elapsed time – but doesnt always

7 Example Of A Performance Profile TIMESOURCE ELAPSED_SECONDS REALELAPSED 25 db file scattered read CPU 8.87 db file sequential read SQL*Net message from client log file sync direct path write SQL*Net message to client

8 Where We Are Going From Here Simple way to get a profile Four different categories time can fall under How to find the correct Oracle session A more accurate way to get a profile A tool that gives you a profile of SQL that has occurred in the past Conclusion and references

9 How To Get A Performance Profile Using V$ Tables – Before Script Run script to start monitoring an Oracle session Get waits from V$SESSION_EVENT Get CPU from V$SESSTAT Get current time Store these in a table

10 DROP TABLE BEFOREOTHERSESSION; CREATE TABLE BEFOREOTHERSESSION AS SELECT SID,EVENT TIMESOURCE,(TIME_WAITED/100) SECONDS FROM V$SESSION_EVENT WHERE SID=&&MONITORED_SID; INSERT INTO BEFOREOTHERSESSION SELECT SID,'CPU' TIMESOURCE,(VALUE/100) SECONDS FROM V$SESSTAT WHERE SID=&&MONITORED_SID AND STATISTIC#=(SELECT STATISTIC# FROM V$STATNAME WHERE NAME='CPU used by this session'); COMMIT;

11 INSERT INTO BEFOREOTHERSESSION SELECT SID,'REALELAPSED' TIMESOURCE, (SYSDATE-TO_DATE('01/01/1900','MM/DD/YYYY'))*24*60*60 SECONDS FROM V$SESSION WHERE SID=&&MONITORED_SID; COMMIT;

12 How To Get A Performance Profile Using V$ Tables – After Script Run script to stop monitoring a session and to get a performance profile report Union together times for waits, CPU and current time Subtract the times stored by the before script Output the difference in order of most time to least

13 SELECT AFTER.TIMESOURCE, AFTER.SECONDS-BEFORE.SECONDS ELAPSED_SECONDS FROM (SELECT SID,EVENT TIMESOURCE,(TIME_WAITED/100) SECONDS FROM V$SESSION_EVENT WHERE SID=&&MONITORED_SID UNION SELECT SID,'CPU' TIMESOURCE,(VALUE/100) SECONDS FROM V$SESSTAT WHERE SID=&&MONITORED_SID AND STATISTIC#=(SELECT STATISTIC# FROM V$STATNAME WHERE NAME='CPU used by this session')

14 UNION SELECT SID,'REALELAPSED' TIMESOURCE, (SYSDATE-TO_DATE('01/01/1900','MM/DD/YYYY'))*24*60*60 SECONDS FROM V$SESSION WHERE SID=&&MONITORED_SID) AFTER, BEFOREOTHERSESSION BEFORE WHERE BEFORE.SID=AFTER.SID AND AFTER.TIMESOURCE=BEFORE.TIMESOURCE ORDER BY ELAPSED_SECONDS DESC; DROP TABLE BEFOREOTHERSESSION;

15 Four Types of Time – Main Point of the Presentation Non-Idle waits - waits within the database Idle waits – waits outside the database CPU Unaccounted-for time – real time minus sum of waits and CPU

16 Non-idle Waits Ones that you hear most about Lots of documentation about what these mean Oracle documentation Metalink Books Articles Can usually reduce these by changing something in the database

17 Common Non-Idle Waits buffer busy waits db file scattered read db file sequential read enqueue latch free log file sync

18 Non-Idle Wait Example TIMESOURCE ELAPSED_SECONDS REALELAPSED 32 enqueue 30.8 CPU 0

19 Non-Idle Wait Example Enqueue wait comprises almost all of the time Indicates that the session is hung on a lock Just find the session that is holding the lock and kill it

20 Idle Waits Typically recommended that you ignore these Not as frequently discussed Many begin with SQL*Net Cant fix by changing something in the database

21 Idle Wait Example TIMESOURCE ELAPSED_SECONDS REALELAPSED 37 SQL*Net message from dblink SQL*Net message from client 1.19 CPU.48 log file sync.02

22 Idle Wait Example Almost all of the time spent waiting for SQL*Net message from dblink This means that the time is spent on a remote database Need to go to the remote database and find the session there and tune it

23 CPU Server processs CPU time Means that the database blocks being accessed are in memory

24 CPU Example TIMESOURCE ELAPSED_SECONDS REALELAPSED 39 CPU 35.7 db file sequential read 3.18 SQL*Net message from client 1.2 control file parallel write.01 log file sync.01

25 CPU Example Almost all of the time is spent using the CPU Tune SQL to reduce number of memory accesses No need to look at I/O systems performance

26 Unaccounted-For Time Least-documented concept in this talk Difference between real time that elapsed and the sum of all the waits and the CPU It is time that Oracles measurements do not account for Best examples are CPU queue wait time and time spent waiting on paging

27 Unaccounted-For Time Example TIMESOURCE ELAPSED_SECONDS REALELAPSED 144 CPU SQL*Net message from client.57 db file sequential read.17 db file scattered read.08 log file sync.03

28 Unaccounted-For Time Example The majority of the time (2/3) is not accounted for by the CPU time or waits Three CPU-intensive SQLs running on my single- processor laptop Unaccounted-for time is time spent on the CPU queue Fixed by reducing contention for the CPU

29 Determining Your Oracle Session To get a profile you have to figure out which session corresponds to the PeopleSoft program that is slow This is complicated by the fact that all PeopleSoft programs login as the same Oracle user Also, some Oracle sessions are shared by multiple PeopleSoft users

30 Many PeopleSoft Programs Connect To One Oracle Session Or Server Process Batch Sqr Cobol Crystal Nvision Application Engine Two-tier Windows client

31 Some PeopleSoft programs share Oracle sessions PeopleSofts application server has several connections to the Oracle database PeopleSoft programs that use the app server share the app servers Oracle sessions Web connections Three-tier Windows Client

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33 How To Find Your Oracle Session Using V$ Tables Can use V$SESSION and V$SQLAREA to find the active PeopleSoft SQL statements Oracle user SYSADM Can use CLIENT_INFO column of V$SESSION to determine PeopleSoft userid and other information Need to set parameter EnableDBMonitoring=1 in app server config file to get CLIENT_INFO populated

34 Query To Find Oracle Session Id SELECT A.SID, A.SERIAL#, TO_CHAR(A.LOGON_TIME,'MM-DD-YYYY HH24:MI:SS') "Logon Time", A.CLIENT_INFO, C.SQL_TEXT FROM V$SESSION A,V$SQLAREA C WHERE A.SQL_ADDRESS=C.ADDRESS (+) AND A.SQL_HASH_VALUE=C.HASH_VALUE (+) AND A.USERNAME = 'SYSADM' AND A.STATUS='ACTIVE' ORDER BY A.STATUS,A.SID,A.SERIAL#;

35 App Server CLIENT_INFO Example SMITH,, ,PROD,PSAPPSRV, PeopleSoft userid Users IP address Database name Program name

36 SQR CLIENT_INFO Example JONES,12904 PeopleSoft user id SQR Unix process id

37 Using Extended SQL Trace And TKPROF To Get A Profile Term comes from Cary Millsap and Jeff Holts book – read it for tons more good information about this Get Oracle trace with waits – Extended SQL Trace Use TKPROF to produce report with waits Piece together a profile from the TKPROF output More accurate than V$ tables – contains wait details Only works in 9i or higher (TKPROF waits=yes)

38 Trace And TKPROF Commands Commands to start and stop trace work from sqlplus First two arguments are session id and serial number TKPROF arguments indicate use of waits Orders SQL by total elapsed time so you see the longest running SQLs first

39 Using Extended Trace and TKPROF To start trace: execute sys.dbms_system.set_ev(12,23,10046,8,); To end trace: execute sys.dbms_system.set_ev(12,23,10046,0,); TKPROF command: tkprof tracefile.txt tkprofout.txt waits=yes "sort=(PRSELA,EXEELA,FCHELA)" SYS=NO

40 Example TKPROF Output I highlight the numbers that will go on a performance profile in red Elapsed and CPU time come from the first part of the report The wait times come from the second part

41 Sample TKPROF Output With Waits select count(*) from dba_segments call count cpu elapsed disk query current rows Parse Execute Fetch total

42 Sample TKPROF Output With Waits Elapsed times include waiting on following events: Event waited on Times Max. Wait Total Waited Waited SQL*Net message to client db file scattered read db file sequential read SQL*Net message from client ***************************************************************

43 TKPROF Output As A Performance Profile TIMESOURCE ELAPSED_SECONDS REALELAPSED db file scattered read CPU 8.12 db file sequential read 5.25 SQL*Net message from client 0.01

44 Using I3 To Get A Profile Of Something In The Past I3 is a tool from Veritas Formerly known as Precise Stores information you need to get a profile of a SQL statement that occurred in the past Have to piece together profile from two places

45 In Oracle Display What I3 calls In Oracle time corresponds to what I call: Non-idle waits – I/O Wait CPU – Using CPU Unaccounted-for time – CPU wait or Memory wait

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47 Overall Activity Display What I3 calls Overall Activity time corresponds to what I call: Idle waits – Request Wait Everything else – bundled together under In Oracle

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49 Conclusion Get a profile of the session that corresponds to the PeopleSoft program that is slow Include all of the information Oracle gives you in the profile and compare it to the real time that elapses Use that profile to direct your tuning efforts so you dont waste time trying everything to improve it

50 References Direct Contention Identification Using Oracle's Session Wait Event Views - Craig Shallahamer Microstate Response-time Performance Profiling - Danisment Gazi Unal Optimizing Oracle Performance – Cary Millsap and Jeff Holt


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