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Feed-up, Feedback, and Feed-Forward PPT available at www.fisherandfrey.com www.fisherandfrey.com Click Resources Feed Up Back Forward Champaign Nancy Frey,

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Presentation on theme: "Feed-up, Feedback, and Feed-Forward PPT available at www.fisherandfrey.com www.fisherandfrey.com Click Resources Feed Up Back Forward Champaign Nancy Frey,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Feed-up, Feedback, and Feed-Forward PPT available at Click Resources Feed Up Back Forward Champaign Nancy Frey, PhD SDSU/HSHMC

2 TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson Guided Instruction I do it We do it You do it together Collaborative Independent You do it alone A Model for Success for All Students Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

3 The sudden release of responsibility TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson I do it Independent You do it alone Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

4 DIY School TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY (none) STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Independent You do it alone Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

5 Time for a Story January 2006

6 TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson Guided Instruction I do it We do it You do it together Collaborative Independent You do it alone A Model for Success for All Students Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Formative Assessment

7 am I going to teach? What are the students going to ? Shifts in Thinking What am I going to teach? What are the students going to do ?

8 What shifts have you witnessed in the profession regarding instruction and assessment? How have these shifts impacted your own practice?

9 Todays Purposes Consider a formative assessment system that feeds information up, back, and forward Link formative assessment to quality instruction and standards-based grading Examine leadership qualities necessary for this effort Discuss these concepts with professional colleagues

10 Comparing Formative and Summative Assessments

11 Why? …formative assessment practices greatly increased the achievement of low- performing students, in some cases to the point of approaching that of high- achieving students. Chappuis, 2009

12 How? Formative assessments create a learning path for students to reach summative assessments, and increase achievement in standards-based grading systems.

13 Formative Assessment : Where is your school? Were ready to teach someone else. Were working on it. What is it? We understand it and we believe in it. Were getting better at it.

14 Want to motivate students? Build their sense of competence.

15 Fisher & Frey, 2009, Hattie & Timperley, 2007 Feed up: establishing purpose Check for understanding: daily monitoring Feedback: providing information about success and needs Feed forward: using performance for next steps instruction and feeding this into an instructional model

16 Establishing Purpose: Why are we doing this anyway? Feed Up

17 A clear learning target establishes criteria for success

18 Two Components: Content Purpose Language Purpose

19 Student Accountability is Established Through Daily Purpose

20 What is the Student Accountability? English C: Describe how a character changes in a story. L: Cite text evidence in your literature circle of the characters change from the beginning of the story to this point.

21 What is the Student Accountability? Mathematics C: Determine reasonableness of a solution to a mathematical problem. L: Use mathematical terms to explain why your answer is reasonable.

22 What is the Student Accountability? Biology C: Identify the phases in animal cell meiosis I and II. L: Describe the similarities and differences between the two through illustration and words.

23 What is the Student Accountability? History C: Identify one contributing cause of the Revolutionary War. L: Explain the cause to a peer and then summarize the cause in writing.

24 Purpose = Expectations

25 Targets defined through competencies and standards-based grading The trend of personalized learning has caught on nationwide, but the entire state of Oregon has been using a similar methodproficiency-based instructionsince 2002 when it gave districts the option to award credit for proficiency. To earn credit, students demonstrate what they know based on clear learning targets defined by state standards. Students have intervention time built into their school day to work on concepts in which they arent yet proficient. Once they master a concept, they move on.

26 In one district, 17 percent more high school students met or exceeded standards on the math portion of the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills in than in , and 11 percent more met or exceeded standards on the reading and literature portion. District Administrator, May 2012, students-thrive-proficiency-based-instruction students-thrive-proficiency-based-instruction

27 Standards-based grading and competencies at HSHMC

28 th graders 62% free/reduced lunch 15% from military families 44% Latino/Hispanic 22% Black 16% Asian 18% White 70% EL students 8.5% Students with disabilities 4% with 504 plans Student Participants

29 We didnt start the fire… …Math did.

30 Standards-based grades derived only from competencies, not attendance, in-class assignments, or homework. Students must pass all competencies with 70% or better. < 70% = Incomplete; student has two weeks to clear it, before mandatory Academic Recovery. RtI 2 initiative, honors contracts now tied to this system.

31 Competencies for English 9/10 Semester 1 Content MeasuredAssessment Format Plagiarism, Citation, Referencing Exam (multiple choice/short answer) Summaries; literary response & analysis (9)Literacy letters Vocabulary development (9)Exam (multiple choice) Research Paper on Essential Question 1Paper & Creative Component Analyzing media, persuasive techniques Exam (multiple choice/short answer) Summaries; literary response & analysis (9)Literacy Letters Vocabulary development (9)Exam (multiple choice) Persuasive Paper on Essential Question 2Paper & Creative Component

32 Competencies for English 9/10 Semester 2 Content MeasuredAssessment Format Analyzing oral communication & speeches Exam (multiple choice/short answer) Summaries; literary response & analysis (9)Literacy letters Vocabulary development (9)Exam (multiple choice) Expository paper on EQ 3Paper & Creative Component Analysis of poetry Exam (multiple choice/short answer) Delivering oral communicationRetelling & dramatic monologue Summaries; literary response & analysis (9)Literacy Letters Vocabulary development (9)Exam (multiple choice) Autobiographical Paper on EQ 4Paper & Creative Component

33 Weekly Incomplete List

34 Everybody knows your business.

35 Academic Recovery

36 Outcomes: Schoolwide HSHMC outperformed state-identified similar schools by 11%. Student achievement increased 4% on state achievement measures. Independent auditor noted that, HSHMC outperforms all [local] schools in the percentage of students at or above proficiency in ELA and math. (Audit report, June 2009) HSHMC outperformed state-identified similar schools by 11%. Student achievement increased 4% on state achievement measures. Independent auditor noted that, HSHMC outperforms all [local] schools in the percentage of students at or above proficiency in ELA and math. (Audit report, June 2009)

37 GPAs increased from 2.89 to 3.36, (t=12.58, df=742, p<.001). The largest gains in GPA came from students living in poverty and students with disabilities. For students living in poverty, average GPA increased from 2.26 to 3.12 (t=16.84, df=414, p<.001). For students with disabilities, average GPA increased from 1.30 to 3.02 (t=7.26, df=61, p<.0001). Outcomes: Grade Point Averages

38 Outcomes: Attendance By the end of the two-year data collection period, attendance had increased from 90.4% to 95.6%.

39 What effects have you seen on student motivation and learning with standards-based grading? What ideas resonate with you?

40 Check for Understanding: What am I learning?

41 Everybody got that? Any questions? Does that make sense? OK? How often do you do this?

42 Oral language Questioning Written language Projects and performance Tests Common assessments and consensus scoring

43 Check for understanding during the process, not just after its completed.

44 Using Oral Language to Check for Understanding

45 Original price of a microphone: $ The tax is 7%. What is the total price you have to pay for this?

46 Wendy says… So, the problem is asking me how much I have to pay for this mic. The information I know is the price and how much tax they make you pay. I think it has to be more than $129, like maybe $150, because the tax is on top of the price. I have to add the tax to the price. But I have to find out how much the tax is. I think you multiply. So I did $ times 7, but that is $909 and that is too much for the microphone. The answer isnt reasonable. But I dont know why it didnt work.

47 What does Wendy know? What doesnt she know? What do you do next?

48 Using Questioning to Check for Understanding

49 Progression of Text-Dependent Questions Opinions, arguments, intertextual connections InferencesAuthors purposeVocab and text structureKey detailsGeneral understandings Part Sentence Paragraph Entire text Across texts Word Whole Segments Source: Frey, N., & Fisher, D. (in press). Common Core State Standards in Literacy (Grades 9-12). Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree.

50 Use effective questioning techniques with all types Wait time (I & II) Repeat their answers to solicit more information Rephrase when the student is confused Prepare key questions in advance LISTEN

51 In what ways does this teacher check for understanding?

52 Checking for Understanding with Clickers Video available at YouTubes FisherandFrey Channel

53 In what ways does this teacher check for understanding?

54 Using Writing to Check for Understanding

55 GIST Summary RAFT Writing Crystal Ball Writing Prompts Writing

56 What are Comon Grammar Errors English Learners Make? Given a word and conditions about the placement of the word, write a sentence Forces attention to grammar and word meaning Use student examples for editing Generative Sentences

57 Volcanoes in the 4th Position

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59 Try these... WordPositionLength cell3rd> 6

60 Try these... WordPositionLength cell3rd> 6 Because1st< 10

61 Try these... WordPositionLength cell3rd> 6 Because1st< 10 Constitutionlast= 10

62 Expanding a Generative Sentence

63 Using Projects and Performances to Check for Understanding Using Projects and Performances to Check for Understanding

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71 What methods do you find to be especially successful for checking for understanding?

72 Feedbac k How am I doing?

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74 Feedback should cause thinking. Wiliam, 2011, p. 127

75 Make feedback useful Timely Specific Understandabl e Actionable

76 Feedback about the task Most common type Corrective feedback Not useful without additional information Youre pointing to the right one. Youll want a transition between these two ideas in your paper. Reread Section 3 of the text because you have this one wrong.

77 Feedback about the processing of the task Did you use the FOIL method to solve that problem? It seems like a prediction might help here, right?

78 Feedback about self-regulation When you put your head down, you stopped listening to your group members. I think you achieved what you set out to achieve, right?

79 Feedback about the self as a person You have great stamina because I can see Youve been working on this for several minutes. I bet youre proud of yourself because you used that strategy Weve been talking about, and its working for you.

80 Reflection What do teachers need to know about feedback? How do your students receive feedback? How do they act upon it?

81 Feed forward Where to next?

82 Using what students know, and do not know, to determine what happens next. Feeding forward involves…

83 Work smarter not harder.

84 Know the difference between a mistake and an error..

85 Factual errorsFactual errors Procedural errorsProcedural errors Transformation errorsTransformation errors MisconceptionsMisconceptions

86 Identify and catalog errors.

87 Recognize when errors are global, and when they are targeted. Whole class Small group Individual

88 Algebra 2

89 English 10

90 World History

91 US History

92 Step 1: Develop pacing guides Step 2: Agree on instructional materials Step 3: Administer common assessment Step 4: Consensus scoring and item analysis Step 5: Revise pacing guides, review assessments, reteach, form intervention groups Step 1: Develop pacing guides Step 2: Agree on instructional materials Step 3: Administer common assessment Step 4: Consensus scoring and item analysis Step 5: Revise pacing guides, review assessments, reteach, form intervention groups A Protocol for Common Assessments

93 Item Analysis in Science a) It gets its food from the soil. Misconception Does not understand that nutrients are manufactured internally by the plant. b) It turns water and air into sugar. Oversimplification Understands that food is manufactured internally, but does not understand that water and the carbon dioxide (from the air) are used to make sugar and oxygen. c) It has chlorophyll to produce food. Overgeneralization Does not understand that some parasitic plants do not contain chlorophyll. d) It adds biomass through photosynthesis. Correct answer

94 The Takeaway

95 Teamwork

96 Taking Formative Assessment School-wide Everyone: Introduction (p. 64) Divide: Steps 1-4 (pp.64-66) Half read Genetics Knowledge Half read Pursuing Mastery in History Everyone: Fruits of Precision Teaching (pp ) How will you link this afternoons work with this process?

97 A Shift in Planning I do a lot of I think about teaching the but now…

98 Quality Teaching through GRR Feed-up, CfU, Feedback, Feed-forward Competencies and Standards-based Grading for Targeted Learning

99 Thank you! click on Resourceswww.fisherandfrey.com


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