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DIABETES AWARENESS PROGRAMME ROTARY DISTRICT 3220 / DASL PRESENTED BY RTN PP PHF RANJAN ALLES.

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Presentation on theme: "DIABETES AWARENESS PROGRAMME ROTARY DISTRICT 3220 / DASL PRESENTED BY RTN PP PHF RANJAN ALLES."— Presentation transcript:

1 DIABETES AWARENESS PROGRAMME ROTARY DISTRICT 3220 / DASL PRESENTED BY RTN PP PHF RANJAN ALLES

2 THE PISS MANNEQUIN IN BRUSSELS

3 DIABETES WAS DISCOVERED IN ANCIENT EGYPT IN THE 16 TH CENTURY BC. IT IS DERIVED FROM THE GREEK WORD DIABEINEIN WHICH MEANS TO PASS THROUGH OR SIPHON. MELLITUS MEANS SWEET AS HONEY IN LATIN. ANCIENT HINDUS USED TO REFER TO IT AS MADHU MEHA WHICH MEANS SWEET WATER. HISTORY OF DIABETES

4 WHAT IS IS A CONDITION WHERE YOUR BLOOD SUGAR LEVEL IS TOO HIGH AND IS CAUSED BY THE LACK OF OR INSUFFICENT PRODUCTION OF INSULIN. THIS CONDITION IS DETRIMENTAL TO HEALTH AND IF LEFT UNTREATED CAN LEAD TO MANY COMPLICATIONS INVOLVING THE KIDNEYS, LIVER, EYES, HEART, NERVES, GUMS ETC AND EVEN DEATH. (A fasting blood sugar level of mg/dl is considered normal)

5 Diagnosis

6 Main Types of Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes (T1DM) Type 1 Diabetes (T1DM) Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM) Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM) Gestational Diabetes (GDM) Gestational Diabetes (GDM)

7 HOW WOULD YOU GET HIGH BLOOD SUGAR? The food you eat provides the cells with the sugar necessary to Generate the energy required by you. The body converts most of the food you eat into sugar and the blood carries this sugar to the cells. Sugar needs the insulin( a hormone) produced by the Islets of Langerhann which is in the pancreas to be absorbed by the cells. If your body does not produce any or enough insulin or if the Insulin you produce does not work right the sugar cannot get absorbed into the cells. At this point the sugar remains in the blood and causes an elevation of the sugar level causing DIABETES.

8 Complications Heart disease & stroke Heart disease & stroke 50% diabetics die of heart disease Kidney failure Kidney failure 20% diabetics die of kidney failure Blindness Blindness 2.5 million diabetics go blind annually Amputation Amputation 1 million amputations annually

9 Global Prevalence - >20yrs Population 7.0 b 8.3 b DM366 m (8.3%)552 m (9.9%) IGT( I MPAIRED GLUCOSE ) 280 m (6.4%)398 m (7.1%) 50% undiagnosed Diabetes Atlas – 5 th Edition – Nov 2011

10 Prevalence - Sri Lankan >20yrs UrbanRural % 2% % 7% % 8.7% Katulanda et.al. Diabetes % - 2 million Pre-diabetes % million

11 Prevalence of Risk Factors in 22,507 – Diabrisk-SL

12 WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF DIABETES? HIGH THIRST FREQUENT URINATION WEIGHT LOSS FOR NO APPARENT REASON FEELING VERY HUNGRY/ TIRED OFTEN SLOW HEALING WOUNDS BLURRY VISION LOSS OF SENSATION OR TINGLING IN THE FEET

13 Causes of T2 Diabetes Interaction of Genetics Genetics Foetal Origins Foetal Origins Lifestyles-Obesity Lifestyles-Obesity Stress Stress

14 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1989 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10. Body mass index Weight in KGS- - Height in metre squared Normal Overweight Obese Severely Obese 40 - < Morbidly Obese

15 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

16 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

17 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

18 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1993 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

19 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1994 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

20 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

21 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1996 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

22 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

23 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1998 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

24 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

25 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

26 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

27 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2002 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

28 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2003 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10. Montana Colorado Arizona

29 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2004 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

30 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2005 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.

31 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2006 Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10. colorado

32 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%-24% 25% Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC Obesity* Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2007 (*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs overweight for 54 person)

33 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%-24% 25% Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC Obesity* Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2008 (*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs overweight for 54 person) Kansas Montana Texas

34 Sri Lanka –Obesity in Urban School Children 7 schools in Colombo 7 schools in Colombo 8-12 years old 8-12 years old 50 students in each Yr 4 -7 (1224) 50 students in each Yr 4 -7 (1224) Obesity 4.3% boys, 3.1% girls Obesity 4.3% boys, 3.1% girls 66% obese from high income 66% obese from high income Wickramasinghe VP, Lamabadusuriya SP, Atapattu N, Sathyadas G, Kurunarathne P. Nutritional status of schoolchildren in an urban area of Sri Lanka. Ceylon Med J Dec;49(4):114-8.

35 How do you Prevent Diabetes 1.Identification of risk factors a. Physical - early Increased BMI Increased waist Low physical activity Family history b. Biochemical - late FBC/ IGT/DM

36 How do you prevent Diabetes 2. Lifestyle Modification Correct Nutrition Adequate exercise Stress Control

37 Correct Nutrition Correct Nutrition What is good for a diabetic is good for all What is good for a diabetic is good for all Golden rule: Quality, Quantity & Timing Golden rule: Quality, Quantity & Timing Quality - Healthy, balanced diet - high fiber natural foods - low in calorie Quality - Healthy, balanced diet - high fiber natural foods - low in calorie Quantity – To ensure ideal body weight Quantity – To ensure ideal body weight Timing - Do not delay or skip meals – 4 small Timing - Do not delay or skip meals – 4 small meals recommended for school kids meals recommended for school kids

38 What is Adequate Exerci se Exercise is essential for all persons of all ages on a regular basis Exercise is essential for all persons of all ages on a regular basis Golden rule: It should be continuous and regular and of your choice Golden rule: It should be continuous and regular and of your choice Try to exercise with family and friends to minimizes boredom Try to exercise with family and friends to minimizes boredom Sedentary activities (e.g. sleeping, reading, playing computer games, watching TV) should be minimized Sedentary activities (e.g. sleeping, reading, playing computer games, watching TV) should be minimized

39 30 min x 5 times a week or more – Good 30 min x 5 times a week or more – Good 30 min x 3 times a week – minimum required 30 min x 3 times a week – minimum required <30 min and/or <3 times a week – Inadequate <30 min and/or <3 times a week – Inadequate Children should play daily at least for 1 hour Children should play daily at least for 1 hour To burn fat - continuous exercise min 3-5 times a week essential To burn fat - continuous exercise min 3-5 times a week essential Exercise Regimes

40 How do you reduce stress? Stress is common in modern lifestyle Stress is common in modern lifestyle Be calm and positive – avoid negative thoughts Be calm and positive – avoid negative thoughts Avoid extreme responses – middle path Avoid extreme responses – middle path Meditation – Yoga Meditation – Yoga Set realistic goals / expectations Set realistic goals / expectations Adapt to changing situations Adapt to changing situations Do not fear to fail – Success is always round the corner Do not fear to fail – Success is always round the corner

41 ROTARY CLUB OF MEMPHIS CENTRAL TYPE ONE DIABETES INITIATIVE Dream Factory-wish for Skylar Bolton- 9 years with diabetes sniffing Black labrador Denali - Rotarian magazine aug 2009

42 Lets save our children

43 CHECK LIST CHECK LIST Seeni Meanie Campaign Check list for Rotarians Seeni Meanie Campaign Check list for Rotarians Appoint a Seeni Meanie (SM) co-ordinator and inform the contact details i.e name, address and mobile number to secretariat by or (contact persons: Laksha / Dhanya) Immediately Appoint a Seeni Meanie (SM) co-ordinator and inform the contact details i.e name, address and mobile number to secretariat by or (contact persons: Laksha / Dhanya) Read the details in the file given on the day of the briefing or the file sent to you. The big SM sticker in the Presidents file is for you to fix same on your Rotary flag! Confirm acceptance of the 2 Action Kits to the SM secretariat – Immediately Read the details in the file given on the day of the briefing or the file sent to you. The big SM sticker in the Presidents file is for you to fix same on your Rotary flag! Confirm acceptance of the 2 Action Kits to the SM secretariat – Immediately Identify 2 (two) foster schools – Inform the secretariat of the names and addresses of the school – Immediately Identify 2 (two) foster schools – Inform the secretariat of the names and addresses of the school – Immediately

44 CHECK LIST CONTINUED Once the Secretariat has registered the schools, you are advised to contact the Medical Officer of Health as well as the Zonal Educational Director of the respective area (Please take a copy of the Education Ministry letter from the Director Nutrition) and inform them of the Diabetes Awareness and Prevention Campaign you hope to conduct in the respective schools- Before 31 st July Meet with the Principal to obtain his or her support. Hand over the letter in the chosen language along with the Education Ministry letter and request the Principal to appoint the SM team (up to 12) including the team leader – Before 3 rd August 2012

45 CHECK LIST CONTINUED If your foster school has an Interact club, they can spearhead the campaign. If your club is supervising an Interact club, they may assist you in the implementation of the project. Rotary club to get the SM team to conduct pre evaluation by photocopying 50 questionnaires (in the preferred language) and return the completed forms to the Secretariat – Before 14 th August 2012 Rotary club to get the SM team to formulate Campaign Ideas and submit the proposal to the Secretariat in the preferred language. This should be done as per the prescribed format in action kits. - Before 14 th August 2012 Rotary club will receive the screened proposal with the approval and recommendations from the Secretariat – 15 th to 31 st August 2012

46 CHECK LIST CONTINUED Implementation of Seeni Meanie Campaign – 1 st September 2012 – 28 th February 2013 Rotary club to get the SM team to conduct post evaluation questionnaire and return same to the Secretariat – 14 th -28 th February 2013 Assistant Governors to evaluate and judge regional cluster campaigns and choose regional winners – 1 st March 2013 – 14 th March 2013 Final evaluation and judging of the Regional winners to choose the National winner and the 1 st and the 2 nd runner up – 15 th March 2012 – 31 st March Awards Nights – Date, Time and Venue to be informed.

47 THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION


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