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10. a) Explain, and if possible demonstrate, how to shelter if you are in difficulty when out walking. AND b) Explain how to deal with and avoid hypothermia.

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Presentation on theme: "10. a) Explain, and if possible demonstrate, how to shelter if you are in difficulty when out walking. AND b) Explain how to deal with and avoid hypothermia."— Presentation transcript:

1 10. a) Explain, and if possible demonstrate, how to shelter if you are in difficulty when out walking. AND b) Explain how to deal with and avoid hypothermia and heat exhaustion.

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3 Hypothermia Hypothermia develops when the body temperature falls below 35°C (95°F) Severe hypothermia - when the core body temperature falls below 30°C (86°F) – is often, but not always fatal. Shivering and pale, cold, dry skin. Disorientation, apathy or irrational behaviour; occasionally belligerence. Impaired consciousness or lethargy. Slow and shallow breathing. Slow and weakening pulse. In extreme cases the heart may stop.

4 Hypothermia Treatment replace wet clothing with warm, dry garments. The casualty can be rewarmed by bathing if they are fit, young and able to climb into a bath unaided. The water should be warm but not too hot – about 40°C (104°F). Put the casualty in a bed and ensure that they are well covered. Give them warm drinks or high energy foods such as chocolate to help rewarm them.

5 Heat Exhaustion Heat exhaustion is caused by a loss of salt and water from the body, usually through excessive sweating. develops gradually and it usually happens to people who are not acclimatised to hot humid conditions or people that are unwell, especially those with illnesses that cause vomiting and diarrhoea. common cause of heat exhaustion is the excessively high body temperature and other physical changes that result from certain drugs taken for pleasure, such as ecstasy. Can cause death.

6 Heat Exhaustion Symptoms Headache. Dizziness and confusion. Loss of appetite. Nausea. Sweating with pale clammy skin. Cramps in the arms, legs and the abdominal wall. Rapid, weakening pulse. Rapid, shallow breathing.

7 Heat Exhaustion Treatment Replace body fluids and salt; to cool the casualty down Help the casualty to a cool place. Get them to lie down with their legs raised. Give them plenty of water. Follow if possible with a weak salt solution - 1 teaspoon of salt per litre of water, assist the casualty to drink it. Even if the casualty recovers quickly, ensure that they see a doctor. If the casualtys responses deteriorate place them into the recovery position and dial 999 or 112 for an ambulance. Monitor and record any vital signs – the level of response, the pulse and breathing rate. Be prepared to give rescue breaths and chest compressions if necessary.

8 9. a) Discuss what preparations you would make for going on an outing. b) Explain what you would do if you got lost when walking in a wood, in fog or in a town.

9 9. a) Know how and where to turn off the gas, electricity and water. b) Explain when you might need to do this and what you would do next.

10 How to Turn off Gas Why would we need to turn off the gas? Do you know where to turn it off in your house? (Often it may be in the kitchen, or the garage if you have one?) If the gas is ON, the handle usually points the same way as the pipe, like an arrow showing the gas is flowing. When it is OFF the handle crosses it like a gate or a dam.

11 Turning off Water & Electricity


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