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Graphing, Calculating, and Interpreting Rate of Improvement Caitlin S. Flinn, Ed.S., N.C.S.P. Andrew E. McCrea, M.S., N.C.S.P. NASP Convention March 3,

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Presentation on theme: "Graphing, Calculating, and Interpreting Rate of Improvement Caitlin S. Flinn, Ed.S., N.C.S.P. Andrew E. McCrea, M.S., N.C.S.P. NASP Convention March 3,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Graphing, Calculating, and Interpreting Rate of Improvement Caitlin S. Flinn, Ed.S., N.C.S.P. Andrew E. McCrea, M.S., N.C.S.P. NASP Convention March 3, 2010

2 Objectives There needs to be a standardized procedure for calculating RoI There needs to be a standardized procedure for calculating RoI Were proposing a method using Simple Linear Regression Were proposing a method using Simple Linear Regression

3 Overview Importance of RoI Importance of RoI RoI Research RoI Research A Need for Consistency A Need for Consistency Calculating RoI Calculating RoI Individual Student Graphs Individual Student Graphs Programming Excel Programming Excel Decision Making Decision Making Grounding the Data Grounding the Data Interpreting Growth Interpreting Growth Individual Student Student Groups Considerations Considerations Resources Resources

4 Importance of Graphs Vogel, Dickson, & Lehman, 1990 Vogel, Dickson, & Lehman, 1990 Speeches that included visuals, especially in color, improved: Speeches that included visuals, especially in color, improved: Immediate recall by 8.5% Immediate recall by 8.5% Delayed recall (3 days) by 10.1% Delayed recall (3 days) by 10.1%

5 Importance of Graphs Seeing is believing. Seeing is believing. Useful for communicating large amounts of information quickly Useful for communicating large amounts of information quickly A picture is worth a thousand words. A picture is worth a thousand words. Transcends language barriers (Karwowski, 2006) Transcends language barriers (Karwowski, 2006) Responsibility for accurate graphical representations of data Responsibility for accurate graphical representations of data

6 Skills Typically Graphed Reading Reading Oral Reading Fluency (ORF) Oral Reading Fluency (ORF) Word Use Fluency (WUF) Word Use Fluency (WUF) Reading Comprehension Reading Comprehension MAZE MAZE Retell Fluency Retell Fluency Early Literacy Skills Early Literacy Skills Initial Sound Fluency (ISF) Initial Sound Fluency (ISF) Letter Naming Fluency (LNF) Letter Naming Fluency (LNF) Letter Sound Fluency (LSF) Letter Sound Fluency (LSF) Phoneme Segmentation Fluency (PSF) Phoneme Segmentation Fluency (PSF) Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF) Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF) Spelling Spelling Written Expression Written Expression Behavior Behavior Math Math Math Computation Math Facts Early Numeracy Oral Counting Missing Number Number Identification Quantity Discrimination

7 Importance of RoI Multi-tiered model Multi-tiered model Progress monitoring Progress monitoring Data for decision-making Data for decision-making Goal setting (Shapiro, 2008) Goal setting (Shapiro, 2008)

8 Importance of RoI Visual inspection of slope Visual inspection of slope Multiple interpretations Multiple interpretations Instructional services Instructional services Need for explicit guidelines Need for explicit guidelines

9 RoI Research Deno, 1985 Deno, 1985 Curriculum-based measurement Curriculum-based measurement General outcome measures General outcome measures Short Short Standardized Standardized Repeatable Repeatable Sensitive to change Sensitive to change

10 RoI Research Fuchs & Fuchs, 1998 Fuchs & Fuchs, 1998 Hallmark components of Response to Intervention Hallmark components of Response to Intervention Ongoing formative assessment Ongoing formative assessment Identifying non-responding students Identifying non-responding students Treatment fidelity of instruction Treatment fidelity of instruction Dual discrepancy model Dual discrepancy model One standard deviation from typically performing peers in level and rate One standard deviation from typically performing peers in level and rate

11 RoI Research Ardoin & Christ, 2008 Ardoin & Christ, 2008 Slope for benchmarks (3x per year) Slope for benchmarks (3x per year) More growth from fall to winter than winter to spring More growth from fall to winter than winter to spring Might be helpful to use RoI for fall to winter Might be helpful to use RoI for fall to winter And a separate RoI for winter to spring And a separate RoI for winter to spring

12 RoI Research Fuchs, Fuchs, Walz, & Germann, 1993 Fuchs, Fuchs, Walz, & Germann, 1993 Typical weekly growth rates Typical weekly growth rates Needed growth Needed growth 1.5 to 2.0 times typical slope to close gap 1.5 to 2.0 times typical slope to close gap Example Example Bob is below benchmark on ORF Bob is below benchmark on ORF Typical slope is 1 wcpm per week growth Typical slope is 1 wcpm per week growth Bob would need slope of 1.5 to 2 to close gap in a reasonable amount of time Bob would need slope of 1.5 to 2 to close gap in a reasonable amount of time

13 RoI Research Deno, Fuchs, Marston, & Shin, 2001 Deno, Fuchs, Marston, & Shin, 2001 Slope of frequently non-responsive children approximated slope of children already identified as having a specific learning disability Slope of frequently non-responsive children approximated slope of children already identified as having a specific learning disability

14 RoI Research Algebraic term: Slope of a line Algebraic term: Slope of a line Vertical change over the horizontal change Vertical change over the horizontal change Rise over run Rise over run m = (y 2 - y 1 ) / (x 2 - x 1 ) m = (y 2 - y 1 ) / (x 2 - x 1 ) Describes the steepness of a line (Gall & Gall, 2007) Describes the steepness of a line (Gall & Gall, 2007)

15 RoI Research Finding a students RoI = finding the slope of a line Finding a students RoI = finding the slope of a line Using two data points on that line Using two data points on that line Finding the line itself Finding the line itself Linear regression Linear regression Ordinary Least Squares Ordinary Least Squares

16 RoI Research Gall & Gall, 2007 Gall & Gall, data points are a minimum requirement for a reliable trendline 10 data points are a minimum requirement for a reliable trendline How does that affect the frequency of administering progress monitoring probes? How does that affect the frequency of administering progress monitoring probes?

17 RoI Research Using RoI for instructional decisions is not a perfect process Using RoI for instructional decisions is not a perfect process Research is currently looking to address sources of error: Research is currently looking to address sources of error: Christ, 2006 – standard error of measurement for slope Christ, 2006 – standard error of measurement for slope Ardoin & Christ, 2009 – passage difficulty and variability Ardoin & Christ, 2009 – passage difficulty and variability Jenkin, Graff, & Miglioretti, 2009 – frequency of progress monitoring Jenkin, Graff, & Miglioretti, 2009 – frequency of progress monitoring

18 RoI Research Questions yet to be empirically answered Questions yet to be empirically answered What parameters of RoI indicate a lack of RtI? What parameters of RoI indicate a lack of RtI? How does standard error of measurement play into using RoI for instructional decision making? How does standard error of measurement play into using RoI for instructional decision making? How does RoI vary between standard protocol interventions? How does RoI vary between standard protocol interventions? How does this apply to non-English speaking populations? How does this apply to non-English speaking populations?

19 How is RoI Calculated? Which way is best?

20 Multiple Methods for Calculating Growth Eye ball Approach Eye ball Approach Last point minus First point Approach Last point minus First point Approach Split Middle Approach Split Middle Approach Linear Regression Approach Linear Regression Approach

21

22

23

24 1.1 Words Per Week

25 RoI Consistency? Eye Ball ??? Last minus First 0.75 Split Middle* 0.50 Linear Regression 1.10

26 RoI Consistency? If we are not all using the same model to compute RoI, we continue to have the same problems as past models, where under one approach a student meets SLD criteria, but under a different approach, the student does not. If we are not all using the same model to compute RoI, we continue to have the same problems as past models, where under one approach a student meets SLD criteria, but under a different approach, the student does not. Hypothetically, if the RoI cut-off was 0.65 or 0.95, different approaches would come to different conclusions on the same student. Hypothetically, if the RoI cut-off was 0.65 or 0.95, different approaches would come to different conclusions on the same student.

27 Technical Adequacy Without a consensus on how to compute RoI, we risk falling short of having technical adequacy within our model. Without a consensus on how to compute RoI, we risk falling short of having technical adequacy within our model.

28 So, Which RoI Method is Best?

29 Literature shows that Linear Regression is Best Practice Students daily test scores…were entered into a computer program…The data analysis program generated slopes of improvement for each level using and Ordinary-Least Squares procedure (Hayes, 1973) and the line of best fit. Students daily test scores…were entered into a computer program…The data analysis program generated slopes of improvement for each level using and Ordinary-Least Squares procedure (Hayes, 1973) and the line of best fit. This procedure has been demonstrated to represent CBM achievement data validly within individual treatment phases (Marston, 1988; Shinn, Good, & Stein, in press; Stein, 1987). This procedure has been demonstrated to represent CBM achievement data validly within individual treatment phases (Marston, 1988; Shinn, Good, & Stein, in press; Stein, 1987). Shinn, Gleason, & Tindal, 1989

30 Growth (RoI) Research using Linear Regression Christ, T. J. (2006). Short-term estimates of growth using curriculum based measurement of oral reading fluency: Estimating standard error of the slope to construct confidence intervals. School Psychology Review, 35, Christ, T. J. (2006). Short-term estimates of growth using curriculum based measurement of oral reading fluency: Estimating standard error of the slope to construct confidence intervals. School Psychology Review, 35, Deno, S. L., Fuchs, L. S., Marston, D., & Shin, J. (2001). Using curriculum based measurement to establish growth standards for students with learning disabilities. School Psychology Review, 30, Deno, S. L., Fuchs, L. S., Marston, D., & Shin, J. (2001). Using curriculum based measurement to establish growth standards for students with learning disabilities. School Psychology Review, 30, Good, R. H. (1990). Forecasting accuracy of slope estimates for reading curriculum based measurement: Empirical evidence. Behavioral Assessment, 12, Good, R. H. (1990). Forecasting accuracy of slope estimates for reading curriculum based measurement: Empirical evidence. Behavioral Assessment, 12, Fuchs, L. S., Fuchs, D., Hamlett, C. L., Walz, L. & Germann, G. (1993). Formative evaluation of academic progress: How much growth can we expect? School Psychology Review, 22, Fuchs, L. S., Fuchs, D., Hamlett, C. L., Walz, L. & Germann, G. (1993). Formative evaluation of academic progress: How much growth can we expect? School Psychology Review, 22,

31 Growth (RoI) Research using Linear Regression Jenkins, J. R., Graff, J. J., & Miglioretti, D.L. (2009). Estimating reading growth using intermittent CBM progress monitoring. Exceptional Children, 75, Jenkins, J. R., Graff, J. J., & Miglioretti, D.L. (2009). Estimating reading growth using intermittent CBM progress monitoring. Exceptional Children, 75, Shinn, M. R., Gleason, M. M., & Tindal, G. (1989). Varying the difficulty of testing materials: Implications for curriculum-based measurement. The Journal of Special Education, 23, Shinn, M. R., Gleason, M. M., & Tindal, G. (1989). Varying the difficulty of testing materials: Implications for curriculum-based measurement. The Journal of Special Education, 23, Shinn, M. R., Good, R. H., & Stein, S. (1989). Summarizing trend in student achievement: A comparison of methods. School Psychology Review, 18, Shinn, M. R., Good, R. H., & Stein, S. (1989). Summarizing trend in student achievement: A comparison of methods. School Psychology Review, 18,

32 So, Why Are There So Many Other RoI Models? Ease of application Ease of application How many of us want to calculate OLS Linear Regression formulas (or even remember how)? How many of us want to calculate OLS Linear Regression formulas (or even remember how)?

33 An Easy and Applicable Solution

34 Get Out Your Laptops! Or Kindly Look Over Your Neighbors Shoulder! I love ROI

35 Open Microsoft Excel Microsoft Office 2003 for PCs Microsoft Office 2003 for PCs Microsoft Office 2007 for PCs Microsoft Office 2007 for PCs Microsoft Office for Macs Microsoft Office for Macs

36 Graphing RoI For Individual Students

37 Setting Up Your Spreadsheet In cell B2, type School Week In cell B2, type School Week In cell C2, type Benchmark In cell C2, type Benchmark In cell D2, type WPM (or Student Scores) In cell D2, type WPM (or Student Scores)

38 Labeling School Weeks In cell B3, type 1 In cell B3, type 1 Continue entering numbers Continue entering numbers through 36 in column B Week 36 will be in cell B38 Week 36 will be in cell B38

39 Entering Benchmarks In cell C3, type the fall benchmark 77 In cell C3, type the fall benchmark 77 In cell C20, type the winter benchmark 92 In cell C20, type the winter benchmark 92 In cell C38, type the spring benchmark 110 In cell C38, type the spring benchmark 110

40 Entering Student Data Points Student data points are entered between cells D3 and D38. Student data points are entered between cells D3 and D38. Type the students score next to the corresponding week that it was administered. Type the students score next to the corresponding week that it was administered.

41 Entering Student Data Points Week 1 – 41 Week 1 – 41 Week 8 – 62 Week 8 – 62 Week 9 – 63 Week 9 – 63 Week 10 – 75 Week 10 – 75 Week 11 – 64 Week 11 – 64 Week 12 – 80 Week 12 – 80 Week 13 – 83 Week 13 – 83 Week Week

42 Entering Student Data Points Week 15 – 56 Week 15 – 56 Week 17 – 104 Week 17 – 104 Week 18 – 74 Week 18 – 74 Week 20 – 85 Week 20 – 85 Week 21 – 89 Week 21 – 89 Week 22 – 69 Week 22 – 69 Week 23 – 85 Week 23 – 85

43 Entering Student Data Points Week 24 – 96 Week 24 – 96 Week 25 – 90 Week 25 – 90 Week 26 – 84 Week 26 – 84 Week 27 – 106 Week 27 – 106 Week 28 – 94 Week 28 – 94 Week 32 – 100 Week 32 – 100

44 *CAUTION* If a student was not assessed during a certain week, leave that cell blank If a student was not assessed during a certain week, leave that cell blank Do not enter a score of Zero (0) it will be calculated into the trendline and interpreted as the student having read zero words correct per minute during that week. Do not enter a score of Zero (0) it will be calculated into the trendline and interpreted as the student having read zero words correct per minute during that week.

45 Creating a Graph Highlight the Highlight the data in Columns C and D Include cells Include cells C2 and D2 through cells C38 and D38 Include any Include any blank cells

46 Creating a Graph Excel 2003/Macs Excel 2003/Macs Click Insert Click Insert Click Chart Click Chart Excel 2007 Excel 2007 Click Insert Find the icon for Line Click the arrow below Line

47 Creating a Graph Excel 2003/Macs Excel 2003/Macs A Chart Wizard window will appear A Chart Wizard window will appear Excel 2007 Excel graphics appear

48 Creating a Graph Excel 2003/Macs Excel 2003/Macs Choose Line Choose Line Choose Line with markers Choose Line with markers Excel 2007 Excel 2007 Choose Line with markers

49 Creating a Graph Excel 2003/Macs Excel 2003/Macs Data Range tab Data Range tab Columns Columns Excel 2007 Excel 2007 Your graph appears

50 Creating a Graph Excel 2003/Macs Excel 2003/Macs Chart Title Chart Title School Week (X Axis) School Week (X Axis) WPM (Y Axis) WPM (Y Axis) Excel 2007 Excel 2007 Change your labels by clicking on the graph

51 Creating a Graph Excel 2003/Macs Excel 2003/Macs Choose where you want your graph Choose where you want your graph Excel 2007 Excel 2007 Your graph was automatically put into your data spreadsheet

52 Creating a Graph Excel 2003/Macs Excel 2003/Macs Excel 2007 Excel 2007

53 Adding a Trendline Excel 2003/Macs Excel 2003/Macs Right click on any of the student data points Right click on any of the student data points Excel 2007 Excel 2007

54 Adding a Trendline Excel 2003/Macs Excel 2003/Macs Choose Linear Choose Linear Excel 2007 Excel 2007

55 Adding a Trendline Excel 2003/Macs Excel 2003/Macs Choose Custom and check box next to Display equation on chart Choose Custom and check box next to Display equation on chart Excel 2007 Excel 2007

56 Adding a Trendline Clicking on the equation highlights a box around it Clicking on the equation highlights a box around it Clicking on the box allows you to move it to a place where you can see it better Clicking on the box allows you to move it to a place where you can see it better

57 Adding a Trendline You can repeat the same procedure to have a trendline for the benchmark data points You can repeat the same procedure to have a trendline for the benchmark data points Suggestion: label the trendline Expected ROI Suggestion: label the trendline Expected ROI Move this equation under the first Move this equation under the first

58 Individual Student Graph

59 The equation indicates the slope, or rate of improvement. The equation indicates the slope, or rate of improvement. The number, or coefficient, before "x" is the average improvement, which in this case is the average number of words per minute per week gained by the student. The number, or coefficient, before "x" is the average improvement, which in this case is the average number of words per minute per week gained by the student.

60 Individual Student Graph The rate of improvement, or trendline, is calculated using a linear regression, a simple equation of least squares. The rate of improvement, or trendline, is calculated using a linear regression, a simple equation of least squares. To add additional progress monitoring/benchmark scores once youve already created a graph, enter additional scores in Column D in the corresponding school week. To add additional progress monitoring/benchmark scores once youve already created a graph, enter additional scores in Column D in the corresponding school week.

61 Individual Student Graph Remember to leave cells blank for the weeks that no score was obtained. Remember to leave cells blank for the weeks that no score was obtained. The graph will incorporate that score into the set of data points and into the trendline. The graph will incorporate that score into the set of data points and into the trendline.

62 Individual Student Graph The slope can change depending on which week (where) you put the benchmark scores on your chart. The slope can change depending on which week (where) you put the benchmark scores on your chart. Enter benchmark scores based on when your school administers their benchmark assessments for the most accurate depiction of expected student progress. Enter benchmark scores based on when your school administers their benchmark assessments for the most accurate depiction of expected student progress.

63 Options for the Graph Resizing Resizing Coloring Coloring Data Labels Data Labels

64 Programming Excel To Calculate RoI A Formula

65 RoI Formula Type RoI in cell B39 below the last week of school Type RoI in cell B39 below the last week of school

66 Calculate Expected Slope Click on cell C39 Click on cell C39 Put your cursor at the top next to the fx Put your cursor at the top next to the fx Type =SLOPE(C3:C38,B3:B38) Type =SLOPE(C3:C38,B3:B38) Hit Enter/Return Hit Enter/Return

67 Calculate Actual Slope Click on cell D39 Click on cell D39 Put your cursor at the top next to the fx Put your cursor at the top next to the fx Type =SLOPE(D3:D38,B3:B38) Type =SLOPE(D3:D38,B3:B38) Hit Enter/Return Hit Enter/Return

68 ROI as a Decision Tool within a Problem-Solving Model

69 Steps 1. Gather the data 2. Ground the data 3. Interpret the data 4. Figure out how to fit Best Practice into Public Education

70 Step 1: Gather Data Universal Screening Progress Monitoring

71 Common Screenings in PA DIBELS DIBELS AIMSweb AIMSweb MBSP MBSP 4Sight 4Sight PSSA PSSA

72 Validated Progress Monitoring Tools DIBELS DIBELS AIMSweb AIMSweb MBSP MBSP

73 Step 2: Ground the Data To what will we compare our student growth data?

74 Multiple Ways to Look at Growth Needed Growth Needed Growth Expected Growth & Percent of Expected Growth Expected Growth & Percent of Expected Growth Fuchs et. al. (1993) Table of Realistic and Ambitious Growth Fuchs et. al. (1993) Table of Realistic and Ambitious Growth Growth Toward Individual Goal* Growth Toward Individual Goal* *Best Practices in Setting Progress Monitoring Goals for Academic Skill Improvement (Shapiro, 2008)

75 Needed Growth Difference between students BOY (or MOY) score and benchmark score at MOY (or EOY). Difference between students BOY (or MOY) score and benchmark score at MOY (or EOY). Example: MOY ORF = 10, EOY benchmark is 40, 18 weeks of instruction (40-10/18=1.67). Student must gain 1.67 wcpm per week to make EOY benchmark. Example: MOY ORF = 10, EOY benchmark is 40, 18 weeks of instruction (40-10/18=1.67). Student must gain 1.67 wcpm per week to make EOY benchmark.

76 Expected Growth Difference between two benchmarks. Difference between two benchmarks. Example: MOY benchmark is 20, EOY benchmark is 40, expected growth (40- 20)/18 weeks of instruction = 1.11 wcpm per week. Example: MOY benchmark is 20, EOY benchmark is 40, expected growth (40- 20)/18 weeks of instruction = 1.11 wcpm per week.

77 Tigard-Tualatin School District (www.ttsd.k12.or.us) Looking at Percent of Expected Growth Tier I Tier II Tier III Greater than 150% Between 110% & 150% Possible LD Between 95% & 110% Likely LD Between 80% & 95% May Need More Likely LD Below 80% Needs More Likely LD

78 Fuchs, Fuchs, Hamlett, Walz, & Germann (1993) Oral Reading Fluency Adequate Response Table Realistic Growth Ambitious Growth 1 st nd rd th th

79 Fuchs, Fuchs, Hamlett, Walz, & Germann (1993) Digit Fluency Adequate Response Table Realistic Growth Ambitious Growth 1 st nd rd th th

80 Making Decisions: Best Practice Research has yet to establish a blue print for grounding student RoI data. Research has yet to establish a blue print for grounding student RoI data. At this point, teams should consider multiple comparisons when planning and making decisions. At this point, teams should consider multiple comparisons when planning and making decisions.

81 Making Decisions: Lessons From the Field When tracking on grade level, consider an RoI that is 100% of expected growth as a minimum requirement, consider an RoI that is at or above the needed as optimal. When tracking on grade level, consider an RoI that is 100% of expected growth as a minimum requirement, consider an RoI that is at or above the needed as optimal. So, 100% of expected and on par with needed become the limits of the range within a student should be achieving. So, 100% of expected and on par with needed become the limits of the range within a student should be achieving.

82

83 Step 3: Interpreting Growth

84 What do we do when we do not get the growth we want? When to make a change in instruction and intervention? When to make a change in instruction and intervention? When to consider SLD? When to consider SLD?

85 When to make a change in instruction and intervention? Enough data points (6 to 10)? Enough data points (6 to 10)? Less than 100% of expected growth. Less than 100% of expected growth. Not on track to make benchmark (needed growth). Not on track to make benchmark (needed growth). Not on track to reach individual goal. Not on track to reach individual goal.

86 When to consider SLD? Continued inadequate response despite: Fidelity with Tier I instruction and Tier II/III intervention. Fidelity with Tier I instruction and Tier II/III intervention. Multiple attempts at intervention. Multiple attempts at intervention. Individualized Problem-Solving approach. Individualized Problem-Solving approach.

87 Three Levels of Examples Whole Class Whole Class Small Group Small Group Individual Student Individual Student - Academic Data - Behavior Data

88 Whole Class Example

89 3 rd Grade Math Whole Class Whos responding? Whos responding? Effective math instruction? Effective math instruction? Who needs more? Who needs more? N=19 N=19 4 > 100% growth 4 > 100% growth 15 < 100% growth 15 < 100% growth 9 w/ negative growth 9 w/ negative growth

90 Small Group Example

91 Intervention Group Intervention working for how many? Intervention working for how many? Can we assume fidelity of intervention based on results? Can we assume fidelity of intervention based on results? Who needs more? Who needs more?

92 Individual Kid Example

93 Individual Kid Making growth? Making growth? How much (65% of expected growth). How much (65% of expected growth). Atypical growth across the year (last 3 data points). Atypical growth across the year (last 3 data points). Continue? Make a change? Need more data? Continue? Make a change? Need more data?

94 RoI and Behavior?

95

96 Step 4: Figure out how to fit Best Practice into Public Education

97 Things to Consider Who is At-Risk and needs progress monitoring? Who is At-Risk and needs progress monitoring? Who will collect, score, enter the data? Who will collect, score, enter the data? Who will monitor student growth, when, and how often? Who will monitor student growth, when, and how often? What changes should be made to instruction & intervention? What changes should be made to instruction & intervention? What about monitoring off of grade level? What about monitoring off of grade level?

98 Who is At-Risk and needs progress monitoring? Below level on universal screening Below level on universal screening Entering 4 th Grade Example DORF (110) ISIP TRWM (55) 4Sight (1235) PSSA (1235) Student A Student B Student C

99 Who will collect, score, and enter the data? Using MBSP for math, teachers can administer probes to whole class. Using MBSP for math, teachers can administer probes to whole class. DORF probes must be administered one- on-one, and creativity pays off (train and use art, music, library, etc. specialists). DORF probes must be administered one- on-one, and creativity pays off (train and use art, music, library, etc. specialists). Schedule for progress monitoring math and reading every-other week. Schedule for progress monitoring math and reading every-other week.

100 Week 1 Week 2 ReadingMathReadingMath 1 st XX 2 nd XX 3 rd XX 4 th XX 5 th XX

101 Who will monitor student growth, when, and how often? Best Practices in Data-Analysis Teaming (Kovaleski & Pedersen, 2008) Best Practices in Data-Analysis Teaming (Kovaleski & Pedersen, 2008) Chambersburg Area School District Elementary Response to Intervention Manual (McCrea et. al., 2008) Chambersburg Area School District Elementary Response to Intervention Manual (McCrea et. al., 2008) Derry Township School District Response to Intervention Model (http://www.hershey.k12.pa.us/ /lib/ /_files/Microsoft_Word_- _Response_to_Intervention_Overview_of_Hershey_Elementary_Model.pdf) Derry Township School District Response to Intervention Model (http://www.hershey.k12.pa.us/ /lib/ /_files/Microsoft_Word_- _Response_to_Intervention_Overview_of_Hershey_Elementary_Model.pdf)

102 What changes should be made to instruction & intervention? Ensure treatment fidelity!!!!!!!! Ensure treatment fidelity!!!!!!!! Increase instructional time (active and engaged) Increase instructional time (active and engaged) Decrease group size Decrease group size Gather additional, diagnostic, information Gather additional, diagnostic, information Change the intervention Change the intervention

103 When Instructional Level is Not the Same as Grade Level Understand needed and expected RoI within broader context: Understand needed and expected RoI within broader context: Needed growth will only get student to next level by next benchmark (as opposed to on level). Needed growth will only get student to next level by next benchmark (as opposed to on level). 100% of expected growth may not be an acceptable minimum (not enough growth b/c level is so low). 100% of expected growth may not be an acceptable minimum (not enough growth b/c level is so low).

104 Grounding RoI When Monitoring Off of Grade Level: Two Options Best Practices in Setting Progress Monitoring Goals for Academic Skill Improvement (Shapiro, 2008). Best Practices in Setting Progress Monitoring Goals for Academic Skill Improvement (Shapiro, 2008). Tigard-Tualatin SD Chart: 150% instead of 100% as minimum RoI requirement??? Tigard-Tualatin SD Chart: 150% instead of 100% as minimum RoI requirement???

105 Questions? & Comments!

106 Resources

107 Resources Florida Center for Reading Research What Works Clearinghouse National Center on RtI

108 Flinn & McCreas RoI Web Site ment/ ment/ ment/ ment/ Download powerpoints, handouts, Excel graphs, charts, articles, etc. Download powerpoints, handouts, Excel graphs, charts, articles, etc. Caitlin Flinn Caitlin Flinn Andrew McCrea Andrew McCrea

109 References Ardoin, S. P., & Christ, T. J. (2009). Curriculum- based measurement of oral reading: Standard errors associated with progress monitoring outcomes from DIBELS, AIMSweb, and an experimental passage set. School Psychology Review, 38(2), Ardoin, S. P. & Christ, T. J. (2008). Evaluating curriculum-based measurement slope estimates using triannual universal screenings. School Psychology Review, 37(1),

110 References Christ, T. J. (2006). Short-term estimates of growth using curriculum-based measurement of oral reading fluency: Estimating standard error of the slope to construct confidence intervals. School Psychology Review, 35(1), Deno, S. L. (1985). Curriculum-based measurement: The emerging alternative. Exceptional Children, 52,

111 References Deno, S. L., Fuchs, L.S., Marston, D., & Shin, J. (2001). Using curriculum-based measurement to establish growth standards for students with learning disabilities. School Psychology Review, 30, Flinn, C. S. (2008). Graphing rate of improvement for individual students. InSight, 28(3),

112 References Fuchs, L. S., & Fuchs, D. (1998). Treatment validity: A unifying concept for reconceptualizing the identification of learning disabilities. Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 13, Fuchs, L. S., Fuchs, D., Hamlett, C. L., Walz, L., & Germann, G. (1993). Formative evaluation of academic progress: How much growth can we expect? School Psychology Review, 22,

113 References Gall, M.D., & Gall, J.P. (2007). Educational research: An introduction (8th ed.). New York: Pearson. Jenkins, J. R., Graff, J. J., & Miglioretti, D.L. (2009). Estimating reading growth using intermittent CBM progress monitoring. Exceptional Children, 75,

114 References Karwowski, W. (2006). International encyclopedia of ergonomics and human factors. Boca Raton, FL: Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Shapiro, E. S. (2008). Best practices in setting progress monitoring goals for academic skill improvement. In A. Thomas and J. Grimes (Eds.), Best practices in school psychology V (Vol. 2, pp ). Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists.

115 References Vogel, D. R., Dickson, G. W., & Lehman, J. A. (1990). Persuasion and the role of visual presentation support. The UM/3M study. In M. Antonoff (Ed.), Presentations that persuade. Personal Computing, 14.


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