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INTEROPERABILITY BETWEEN THE PRIVATE & PUBLIC SECTORS 3 FACTORS TO IMPROVE EMERGENCY RESPONSE Toronto Police Emergency Management Symposium November 25-27,

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Presentation on theme: "INTEROPERABILITY BETWEEN THE PRIVATE & PUBLIC SECTORS 3 FACTORS TO IMPROVE EMERGENCY RESPONSE Toronto Police Emergency Management Symposium November 25-27,"— Presentation transcript:

1 INTEROPERABILITY BETWEEN THE PRIVATE & PUBLIC SECTORS 3 FACTORS TO IMPROVE EMERGENCY RESPONSE Toronto Police Emergency Management Symposium November 25-27, 2009

2 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES 1.Commercial Property Management (the backdrop) 2.Emergency Planning Gaps 3.Case Study & Learning City Core Interoperability - the common foundation 5.A shift is underway

3 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES (CONTD) 6.3 – factors that improve Emergency Response 7.Interoperability – Framework 8.Conclusion 9.QUESTIONS

4 INTEROPERABILITY – THE DAY IN THE LIFE OF………

5 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Some 24,000 business and professional service firms in Toronto Toronto is home to 9 of Canada's 10 largest law practices, 9 of the top 10 accounting firms, 7 of the 10 largest advertising and communications agencies and all 10 top human resources and benefits firms (Source: City of Toronto Business Clusters; 2001 data) The safety and security of the employees of these businesses rest with the leadership team of these businesses

6 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT (CONTD) Accountability for the safety and security shared More often than not, the landlord/owners assume more responsibility than is practical

7 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT (CONTD) Often a person/dept responsible to ensure the right level of safety and security practices are in place Highly trained and qualified staff

8 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT (CONTD) The property management teams of these office towers and buildings will: Conduct fire drills Provide in house safety & security training Established fire (evacuation) wardens/PRA (mobility impaired) programs

9 EMERGENCY PLANS Every building/tower will have some sort of an emergency plan Canada Labour Code & Ontario Occupational Health & Safety Act CLC; 124 & 125 OH&SA; Section 24 (2)(h) Section 25 (2) Often a team has been established, respond to and manage the emergency This team is often comprised of: Building operators (engineers) Security

10 EMERGENCY PLANS (CONTD) Regardless of the plan names, there are common objectives: Protect the safety and lives of the building occupants Mitigate the impact of a disaster and speed recovery, and Maintain the reputation of the landlord/owner and property

11 EMERGENCY PLAN GAPS There appears to be two (2) common gaps that exist: 1.What Plans do the tenants of these buildings/towers have? 2. What are the plans of the various emergency services (public agencies)? What do they require of us? How will what they do affect what we do/can we still carryout our response? How much in charge are the emergency services, does it depend on the agency? Will they tell us to evacuate our building?

12 CASE STUDY & LEARNING City Core 2005 Agencies comprised of: Toronto Police Service - Public Safety Unit, 52 Division, Joint CBRN Team, ETF; Toronto Fire Service - Joint CBRN Team, Heavy Haz, South Command, elements of HUSAR; Toronto EMS - Joint CBRN Team; Toronto Public Health; Shelter Support Housing and Administration; Toronto OEM - EOC activated with Toronto Emergency Management Program Committee; Toronto Transit Commission.

13 CASE STUDY & LEARNING (contd) City Core 2005 An explosion at the St. Andrews Subway Station in downtown Toronto A bomb threat & second explosion in a near by office Tower Discovery of undetonated improvised explosive devices Hydrogen cyanide gas release

14 CASE STUDY & LEARNING (contd) City Core 2005 Building Tenants volunteered their time ( role of evacuees and victims) A total of 200 responders (emergency services and private sector) participated At the time was the only exercise of its kind conducted jointly with the private sector (property management organization)

15 CITY CORE LEARNING (CONTD) After the exercise, a debrief hot wash occurred with the management team and property responders. Learnings included: The command team would need to evacuate the tower The building would be fully evacuated Resources required to manage evacuees would be stretched

16 CITY CORE LEARNING (CONTD) Learnings included: The property would be left to manage the incident/impact until the emergency services, CBRN, Toronto Fire… had setup and confirmed what they were dealing with The incident commander and or Sr. team leader maybe required to be a direct resource for the emergency agencies

17 INTEROPERABILITY - THE COMMON FOUNDATION NFPA 1600/ICS Fire Safety Plan Objective to protect life, reduce impact (protect the asset) and speed recovery

18 A SHIFT IS UNDERWAY Relationships have been and continue to be established between the two sectors BOMA TORONTO (Building Owners and Management Association) DRIE – GTIME (Disaster Recovery Information Exchange- Greater Toronto Incident Management Exchange) TAPPS (Toronto Association of Private Police and Security) - (2008 recipient of the Chief Michael Shanahan Award for Excellence in public/private cooperation)

19 A SHIFT IS UNDERWAY (CONTD) SAFE GROUP (South Area Facility Entertainment) BENS (Business Executives for National Security) SAFEGAURD IOWA- PARTNERSHIP

20 Public-Private Alliances to the Rescue Many companies are realizing that they can play a crucial role in helping communities recover from natural catastrophes by Rachael King Special Report - July 7, 2008

21 ARTICLE HIGHLIGHTS 1. Businesses increasingly use their technological expertise 2.If a community around an organization fails to stand backup, a company cant fully bounce back 3. The need for companies to get involved will rise 4.Businesses have the motivation, its their asset, their market place, their employees that are at risk

22 3 – FACTORS THAT CAN IMPROVE EMERGENCY RESPONSE Preparedness – the 4 Cs Post-Mortems Transparent Communication

23 3 – FACTORS THAT CAN EMERGENCY RESPONSE (CONTD) PREPAREDNESS- THE 4Cs Communication When will it occur (frequency)? What we will be shared? Whom will it be established with?

24 3 – FACTORS THAT CAN IMPROVE EMEREGNCY RESPONSE (CONTD) PREPAREDNESS- THE 4 Cs Command When will this happen? Where will this happen? Who is in command? (private or public)

25 3 – FACTORS THAT CAN IMPROVE EMERGENCY RESPONSE (CONTD) PREPAREDNESS- THE 4 Cs Control/Containment How will the impact be controlled & the spread be contained? What can we do to contribute? What resources are essential? What can be done before hand?

26 3 – FACTORS THAT CAN IMPROVE EMERGENCY RESPONSE (CONTD) PREPAREDNESS- THE 4 Cs Coordination Establishment of ICS? Between whom? From where?

27 3 – FACTORS THAT CAN IMPROVE EMERGENCY RESPONSE (CONTD) TRANSPARENT COMMUNICATION Based on trust Failure to communicate - increases assumptions Has to reach the responders Devalues the preparedness efforts

28 3 – FACTORS THAT CAN IMPROVE INTEROPERABILITY (CONTD ) POST-MORTEMS Validates what worked and what didnt Contributes to future preparedness efforts Takes the time to recognize the efforts of all responders (public and private) Improves trust Re-addresses the 4 Cs

29 INTEROPRABILITY – FRAMEWORK BENS & STATE OF CALFORNIA MOU HIGHLIGHTS Private sector will support emergency response and recovery consistent with the Standardized Emergency Management System and the National Incident Management System. Private sector facilities intended to provide a locally based function will integrate with emergency management at the city and county government levels, as appropriate

30 INTEROPRABILITY – FRAMEWORK (CONTD) MOU HIGHLIGHTS Notification: A standard and shared communication tool Development of a Business Operations Center ("BOC") within the State Operations Center

31 INTEROPRABILITY – FRAMEWORK (CONTD) MOU HIGHLIGHTS The partnerships will work with OES and other business entities to evaluate lessons learned after each proclaimed disaster Information essential to affect emergency response will be shared amongst business partners and OES consistent with applicable laws and the need to protect sensitive proprietary information

32 CONCLUSION Open transparent communication is essential (preparedness & post event) Secret or confidential information is not being sought Input from everyone is critical to improving and enhancing interoperability The information has to get to the planners & responders

33 QUESTIONS?


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