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Carbon Foot Printing for Textile Industries Windsor Suite Hotel, Bangkok 27 October 2010 Training on Reducing Carbon Foot Print in Textile Industries Dr.

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Presentation on theme: "Carbon Foot Printing for Textile Industries Windsor Suite Hotel, Bangkok 27 October 2010 Training on Reducing Carbon Foot Print in Textile Industries Dr."— Presentation transcript:

1 Carbon Foot Printing for Textile Industries Windsor Suite Hotel, Bangkok 27 October 2010 Training on Reducing Carbon Foot Print in Textile Industries Dr. Balasankari B.E., M.Engg., Ph.D Arul Joe Mathias B.E., M.Engg., MBA

2 WHAT IS CARBON FOOT PRINTING (CFP)? GHG emission caused directly or indirectly by an individual, event or product Measure of environmental impact Considers CO 2 and GHG emissions Unit: t CO 2e

3 Accounts energy inputs and emission outputs Limited to emissions effects on climate change Consider life cycle assessment APPROACHES…

4 Organisational carbon foot print – deals with entire activities Product carbon foot print (single product / activity / service) – deals with life of product All activities and products through the supply chain – Considers right from production to until end use TYPES OF CFP

5 GHG protocol Carbon trust standard ISO ISO PAS 2050 Legal sector alliance protocol STANDARDS FOR CFP

6 Scope 1 - direct emission Scope 2 - indirect emission due to the generation of purchased electricity Scope 3 - all other indirect emissions SCOPES

7 Decision on the method/procedure/standard to be followed Identification of organisational and operational boundaries Collection of data Application of the emissions factors Verification of the results Devising a strategy to reduce emission Verifying the actions to reduce emission STEPS TO BE FOLLOWED

8 Is based on GHG protocol corporate standards Includes – Required Information – Optional Information REPORTING

9 Carbon Foot Printing inTextile Industries

10 INTRODUCTION Textile industries are the biggest sources of GHGs Clothing industry accounts for 4% of global CFP >1 million tons of textiles are thrown away each year They do not decompose quickly Generate methane while decomposing (e.g. woolen garments)

11 SIGNIFICANCE Significant in entire processes from cotton growing to until delivery to retailers and final disposal Cotton cultivation practices – chemicals & machineries, Ginning – electricity Spinning – humidification & other electrical applications Wet processing – heat & chemicals Garment, carpet, woollen, jute - electricity & chemicals Logistics to retailer – transportation : fossil fuels Ultimate Result global warming

12 GLOBAL IMPACT For producing 60 billion kg of fabric every year 132 million metric tons of coal is burnt and 9 trillion litres of water is used In 2009, first carbon foot print for textile and related products were released in UK

13 CO 2 CONTRIBUTION FROM TEXTILE SECTORS 1 2 3

14 CFP REDUCTION OPTIONS Energy efficiency measures Use of renewable energy

15 Spinning – potential to reduce energy use by 10% Water treatment – potential to reduce about 20% emissions reduction Dyeing – Some of the new technologies and organic dyestuffs reduce emissions by about 20% Finishing – old machinery replacement and elimination of diesel generators reduce emission by 15% CFP REDUCTION POTENTIALS

16 EXAMPLE FOR CFP REDUCTION 25% savings in climate change impact for gentle power bleach

17 GENTLE POWER BLEACH Peroxide bleach preparation at mild conditions (at low temperature of 65 o C & neutral pH) – Enhanced quality No fiber damage Increased garment durability Enzyme technology – Saves in energy and water – Reduces cotton weight loss

18 Case Study 1 CFP of A T-shirt White colour Mens T-shirt Large size

19 CONTINENTAL CLOTHING COMPANY Products: Blank printable t-shirts, polo shirts and sweat shirts

20 PROCESSES INVOLVED Organic cotton farming Ginning Spinning Knitting Dyeing Cutting and sewing Transport to harbor Ship transport Transport to shops Usage by user Final disposal

21 CFP OF A T-SHIRT – NORMAL PROCESS CFP of one t-shirt adds – kg CO 2

22 CFP MEASURES Organic farming 100% certified organic cotton shirts Natural irrigation practice Cotton farms were located in such a way that monsoon rain could supply 95% of water Renewable energy use Production facility is powered by a nearby wind farm

23 Cotton waste generated used as organic fertiliser or used for other textile and upholstery products Dyes made in controlled environment wastewater is thoroughly treated Packaging using biodegradable or 100% recycled materials. CFP MEASURES …

24 CFP ASSESSMENT PROCESS

25 Actual CFP of a T-shirt with grid usage: 6.5 kg CO 2 e CFP after RE measure: 0.65kg CFP REDUCTION USING RENEWABLES

26 Case Study 2 CFP of a woolen sweater Merino wool Normal size

27 PROCESSES CONTRIBUTING TO CFP Starts from sheep breeding and ends in final disposal of the sweater by end user – Sheep breeding – Wool scouring/shearing – Sorting and grading – Dyeing – Spinning – Knitting – All packaging – Transportation to distribution centers and stores – Washing by user – Final disposal

28 CONSIDERATIONS FOR CFP Boundary for CFP calculation: Entire production chain Life Cycle Analysis methodology CFP was estimated by means of the leading textile company

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