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How to Write a Yearbook Feature There is no substitute for good writing. It flows. It glows. It lives. -Susan Duncan.

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Presentation on theme: "How to Write a Yearbook Feature There is no substitute for good writing. It flows. It glows. It lives. -Susan Duncan."— Presentation transcript:

1 How to Write a Yearbook Feature There is no substitute for good writing. It flows. It glows. It lives. -Susan Duncan

2 REMEMBER most yearbook copy should be features, not news.

3 Make your features interesting. If youre bored reading it, others will be also.

4 Find a central idea or angle for your story. How can I present this topic in a new way?

5 Capture true feeling and human interest in your story.

6 Use a clustering technique or brainstorming to get a list of ideas to possibly include in your feature.

7 Compose good questions to use in your interview. Avoid yes/no questions. Ask plenty of HOW and WHY questions. Use DESCRIBE questions. You are asking questions to get specifics for your copy.

8 INTERVIEW the subject. Do not let the wordsGive me a quote ever come out of your mouth.

9 Sit down and talk to the subject with your question sheet in hand, but dont be limited by your pre- interview questions. Ask follow- up questions. Write down everything the person says or use a recorder. This is the most important part of the process.

10 If a person you are interviewing says just make something up, tell them you are taking journalism, not creative writing. Give them more time or ask more questions to spur them into saying something actually worth putting down on paper.

11 Avoid I enjoyed, I was excited, It was interesting, hard work and determination, or any other cliché quotes.

12 Write the feature using interviews from three or more sources. Write while the interviews are fresh.

13 Write your lead, using a narrative, a shocking statement, an incredible quote, an anecdote, or specific information about the subject.

14 Use at least three good quotes per copy block tied together with transition or fact paragraphs.

15 Dont be stodgy or too formal. You are a student, not Confucius. Avoid Webster too. Hes also dead.

16 End the feature with a good quote, a scene, an anecdote, or a startling statement.

17 Make your feature complete a circle from the lead to the conclusion. The reader should sigh in admiration that the path you began in the lead has been brought full circle in the conclusion.


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