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CAP 112: All About Advocacy. Objectives Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to: Identify the steps in the advocacy process Distinguish.

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Presentation on theme: "CAP 112: All About Advocacy. Objectives Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to: Identify the steps in the advocacy process Distinguish."— Presentation transcript:

1 CAP 112: All About Advocacy

2 Objectives Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to: Identify the steps in the advocacy process Distinguish advocacy from related concepts such as information, education, social marketing, etc. Set an advocacy objective for an advocacy campaign Undertake a situation analysis by mapping power dynamics and relationships Identify a target audience and analyze their interest in an advocacy issue Tailor a message according to the interests of a target audience

3 Agenda Welcome and Introductions Overview of Advocacy Identifying the steps in the advocacy process Distinguishing advocacy from related concepts Setting an advocacy objective Undertaking a situation analysis Identifying a target audience Tailoring a message according to the interests of a target audience Summary, Reflection and Evaluation

4 What is Advocacy? Brainstorm words associated with advocacy: *

5 Sample Definitions of Advocacy Advocacy is the act or process of supporting a cause or issue. An advocacy campaign is a set of targeted actions in support of a cause or issue. We advocate a cause or issue because we want to: build support for that cause or issue; influence others to support it; or try to influence or change legislation that affects it. From International Planned Parenthood Federation: IPPF Advocacy Guide 1995

6 Advocacy is, at its most basic, a process for changing the status quo the way things are and the way things are done and it is based on protecting the rights of individuals (Bateman, 1995). The Action Through Advocacy Guidebook: The How-tos of Advocating for Cancer Control Sample Definitions of Advocacy Contd …..

7 Advocacy is a planned, deliberate, sustained effort to raise awareness of an issue. It's an ongoing process in which support and understanding are built incrementally over an extended period of time and using a wide variety of marketing and public relations tools. Advocacy is about saying to decision-makers, potential partners, funders, any stakeholder, "Your agenda will be greatly assisted by what we have to offer. Canadian Association of Public Libraries Sample Definitions of Advocacy Contd …..

8 Advocacy groups give a voice to their constituents and clients. Advocacy is about representing an organization to other organizations, and using the instruments of marketing and public relations to shape a broader debate about policy problems and solutions. Sample Definitions of Advocacy Contd …..

9 What is Policy? A policy, a course of action or inaction chosen by public authorities to address a given problem or interrelated set of problems. (Leslie Pal) Two Other Definitions: Policy: anything a government chooses to do or not do (Thomas Dye) Policy Development is the process of transforming information and ideas into advice and a course of action consistent with the governments priorities (The Ontario Cabinet Decision-Making System: Procedures Guide)

10 Government often thinks of the entire process, from beginning to end, as policy development, and the non-government people who do it as practicing "government relations. policy developmentadvocacy Voluntary organizations often split the activity into two parts: policy development and advocacy (moving the policy or interest forward). Difference Between Policy and Advocacy

11 Lobbying is a specific form of advocacy Lobbying always involves advocacy but advocacy does not always involve lobbying. To lobby means to communicate with decision- makers at any level of government in order to influence the introduction or enactment of legislation. It also includes all the activities designed to get constituents to put pressure on decision-makers. Lobbying

12 The objective of lobbying is to have the legislation you support passed or the legislation you oppose defeated or modified. Lobbying requires knowledge about the legislative process, elected representatives themselves as well as key influencers, and principles of effective persuasion. Lobbying

13 Advocacy can become confrontational, but it is better if you assume that politics make strange bed fellows and look at everyone you encounter as a possible ally rather than an opponent The most effective advocacy often occurs when you can get decision-makers involved in strategy building with you. They then understand the issue and will likely become your advocate at the government level. Is Advocacy Always Adversarial?

14 KNOWLEDGENOISEPOLICYPOLITICAL KNOWLEDGE + NOISE = POLICY & POLITICAL CHANGE InformationOrganization Facts Alliances AnalysisStrategies/tactics Engaged constituencies Positions Arguments/Demands Alternatives Messages

15 1.Issue 2.Goal and Objectives 3.Target Audience 4.Message development 5.Channel of communication 6.Building Support 7.Fundraising 8.Implementation 9.Ongoing data collection 10.Ongoing monitoring and evaluation Steps in the Advocacy Process

16 1.Identify a situation in which advocacy was involved 2.Working alone or with a partner, review the list of steps in the advocacy process (page 9 in the workbook) 3.For each item on the list, provide a definition, and an example from your own experience where this step was used 4.Share your list of definitions and experiences with your small group. 5.Be prepared to share key themes from your groups discussion at ___ oclock. Exercise 1: Steps in the Advocacy Process

17 Key Definitions Issue:an important question that is in dispute and must be settled (from wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn, accessed June 16, 2008)wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn Goal:An advocacy goal is a long-term (5-10 year) vision for change Objective:An advocacy objective is a specific, short-term, action-oriented target. Target audience: the term usually used to describe groups in the community selected as being the most appropriate eg; primary purchasers, users or influencers... (from newsmedianet.com.au/home/Glossary.jsp, accessed June 16, 2008) newsmedianet.com.au/home/Glossary.jsp

18 Key Definitions Contd …. Message development: A message is a concise statement whose purpose is to prompt your audiences (the people you want to reach) to act in a way that supports the goals of your organization or its campaign…Usually one to four sentences long, a message captures the essence of your work and why it is relevant and worthy of attention and support. (from The Communications Network: Strengthening The Voice Of Philanthropy at http://www.comnetwork.org/verizon_resourcecenter/message_ch1.htm accessed June 16, 2007 Channels of communication: the media used to covey information from a sender (or transmitter) to a receiver (From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_(communications) accessed June 16, 2008) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_(communications Building support: increasing momentum for the change Fundraising:raising revenues required for the campaign

19 ApproachActors /Organizers Target Audience ObjectiveStrategiesMeasuring Success Information, Education, Social Marketing Public Relations Community Mobilization Advocacy Advocacy and Related Concepts

20 More Definitions… Social Marketing: Social Marketing: Social marketing is the systematic application of marketing along with other concepts and techniques to achieve specific behavioral goals for a social good. (accessed from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_marketing, June 16, 2008) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_marketing Public Relations: Public Relations: a form of communication primarily directed toward gaining public understanding and acceptance. Public relations usually deals with issues rather than products or services, and is used to build goodwill with the public or employees.(from http://www.learnthat.com/define/view.asp?id=52, accessed June 16, 2008) http://www.learnthat.com/define/view.asp?id=52 Community Mobilization: Community Mobilization: a process through which action is stimulated by a community itself, or by others, that is planned, carried out, and evaluated by a community's individuals, groups, and organizations on a participatory and sustained basis to improve the issue or problem in question (adapted from LUMS-McGill Social Development Center http://sedc.org.pk/portal/general/theme_desc.php?themeid=44, accessed June 16, 2008 http://sedc.org.pk/portal/general/theme_desc.php?themeid=44

21 goal objective An advocacy goal is a long-term (5-10 year) vision for change. An advocacy objective is a specific, short- term, action-oriented target. Setting an Advocacy Objective

22 Characteristics of SMART objectives: S specific M measurable A achievable R realistic T time-bound

23 3 Every advocacy objective must contain the 3 following elements: Policy actor or decision-maker + Policy action or decision + Timeline and degree of change Elements of an Advocacy Objective

24 1.Identify the policy actor or decision-maker who has the power to convert the advocacy objective into a reality (i.e., Minister of Health, Chair of a Parliamentary Subcommittee, etc.). 2.Identify the specific policy action or response required to fulfill the objective (i.e., adopt a certain policy or allocate funds to support an initiative). 3.Stipulate the time-frame and degree of change desired. Advocacy objectives usually focus on a 1-2 year period. Can the policy be formulated and adopted in a 1-2 year period? Also, some advocacy objectivesbut not allindicate a quantitative measure of change. Elements of an Advocacy Objective Contd

25 You are an organization committed to improving the conditions in the educational system for children with special needs. Currently your school board only provides a full time attendant to those children who exhibit extreme behavioral problems. Children with physical difficulties are not provided with any attendant care by the school board. Some are eligible for provincial government funding, while others are dependent on their families or go without any assistance and ask teachers and other children help. Your organization has decided to develop an advocacy campaign to rectify this inequity. Task: Develop an advocacy objective for this organizations campaign. Case Study:

26 CRITERIAOBJECTIVE: What would you change? Do qualitative or quantitative data exist to show that the objective will improve the situation? Is the objective achievable? Even with opposition? Will the objective gain the support of many people? Do people care about the objective deeply enough to take action? Will you be able to raise money or other resources to support your work on the objective? Can you clearly identify the target decision- makers? What are their names or positions? Is the objective easy to understand? Checklist for Selecting an Advocacy Objective

27 CRITERIAOBJECTIVE: What would you change? Does the advocacy objective have a clear time frame that is realistic? Do you have the necessary alliances with key individuals or organizations to reach your advocacy objective? How will the objective help build alliances with other non profit organizations, leaders, or stakeholders? Will working on the advocacy objective provide people with opportunities to learn about and become involved with the decision-making process? Checklist for Selecting an Advocacy Objective

28 Target Audience: Advocacy Issue: Evaluate the target audiences: (1 = low; 5 = high) Level of familiarity with your network/organization 1 2 3 4 5 Level of knowledge about your advocacy issue 1 2 3 4 5 Level of agreement with your position on the issue 1 2 3 4 5 Level of previous, demonstrated support for your issue 1 2 3 4 5 Audience Analysis Form

29 Exercise 2: Developing a Power Map List the following information to develop a power map for your advocacy campaign: Advocacy objective Key policy makers (titles only) Key actorsinstitutions or individuals who have an interest on the advocacy issue Symbols to depict each actors stance on the issue – positive, negative or neutral

30 Exercise 2: Developing a Power Map Contd Now draw a map showing the location of power sources as well as: 1.Additional allies that belong on the map 2.Interconnection between the actors

31 Primary: Those with potential interests/benefits related to the issue Influential: Secondary audiences who can exert influence over your target audience Identify your Target Audiences

32 Develop your messages (advertisements, speeches, scenarios for interpersonal exchanges, and so on) for each of your target audiences. Every message must involve some form of tangible action to answer the inevitable question: "Now what?" Remember to consider possible barriers to adopting action immediately. Solve the problem or show people how to overcome barriers! Develop a Message Framework

33 Be sure that your messages answer the other question that a number of people in your target audience will be sure to ask: "So what?" Your answer will be crucial for showing the target audience that your message is relevant. Go beyond slogans. You may want to get "creative" minds (volunteers or suppliers) involved. Develop a Message Framework Contd

34 Another approach would be to have members of the target audience participate in the message development process. Try not to involve people who know too much about your program or the issue. Find people who know the audience. The idea is not to please your committee members, but to reach an audience on its own terms. Develop a Message Framework Contd

35 After you have developed your messages, ask typical members of the target audience (who don't know you personally) to provide you with feedback. Ask the following questions about your positioning statement: Is it attention-getting? Is it clear? Is it relevant? Is it persuasive? Is it credible? Is it generating the desired behaviour/action? Adapted from Health Canadas social marketing tutorial http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hppb/marketingsocial/guide_service.html Develop a Message Framework Contd

36 1.What is our objective? 2.Who is our listener? 3.What is our approach? 4.What am I talking about? 5.Who is involved? 6.Where is it? 7.When is it? 8.Why is it? 9.How do I do it? 10.What is our Hook to attract attention? Develop your Subject

37 Do they reinforce/and or explain my objective? Do they relate to my listener? Do they correspond to my approach? What do I want from my listener? Check Answers Against the Following

38 Who will be our messenger? Time and place of delivery? The Message:

39 Thinks and plans systemically Knows how to use and access necessary resources Understands the environment of the decision-maker Knows how to contact key decision-makers Gets the information to the right decision-maker An Effective Advocate

40 Knows who can get to the key decision-makers Understands the importance of timing Acts always with a group -- never as a lone wolf Says thank you often and always keeps the lines of communication open -even with the opposition An Effective Advocate Contd

41 Advocacy and Related Concepts ApproachActors /Organizers Target AudienceObjectiveStrategiesMeasuring Success Information, Education, Social Marketing Health promoters Service providers Individuals Segments of a community Raise awareness and change behavior Sort by audience Mass media campaigns CommunityOutreach Traditional media Measuring knowledge/skills acquired and behavior change Process indicators Focus groups Service delivery statistics Public RelationsCommercial institutions ConsumersImprove the company s image and increase ales Large scale advertising (radio, TV, print, media) *Public events Improved public perception Increased sales Increased market share Community Mobilization Community members and organizations Community members and leaders Build a community s capacity to prioritize needs and take action *Door to door visits *Town hall meetings *Action research Issue specific process and outcome indicators AdvocacyNon-profits Advocacy organizations Professional Associations Research institutions All levels of government Policy makers at all decision making levels Change polices, programs, allocations of funding Focus on policy makers with the power to affect advocacy objective One on one lobbying meetings Public events(press conferences, protests) Policy change Process Indicators Media scans Key informant interviews Focus groups Opinion surveys

42 Objectives Having completed this workshop, you should now be able to: Identify the steps in the advocacy process Distinguish advocacy from related concepts such as information, education, social marketing, etc. Set an advocacy objective for an advocacy campaign Undertake a situation analysis by mapping power dynamics and relationships Identify a target audience and analyze their interest in an advocacy issue Tailor a message according to the interests of a target audience

43 COURSE EVALUATIONS AND ……..

44 CAP 112: All About Advocacy


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